'The Lighthouse' - Spoiler Thread

Sweeney Swift

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
14,743
#IStandWithTaylor
Even if the trailers intrigue me? I think I'd enjoy the style of the film re: cinematography and acting/accents.
I think so too but
I know this movie goes a bit off the rails at the end with their decent into madness, but would you say the overall movie is Lynch like in that it's overall mostly incompressible and "weird for the sake of being weird"(I know it's not the best argument against his stuff, but still)?
the second half goes this route. I loved it and I love that general vibe, it makes me want to rewatch it, but it's not going to be for everyone, and if it's a thing that in the moment affects your enjoyment, I can see it retroactively affecting your overall opinion of the first half when it starts to fully descend

TL;DR if it's as much a turnoff as you make it sound like that type of stuff is for you, I don't think this is a film you'll end up liking
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,939
Can someone answer me a question without spoiling the movie?

My biggest concern with this is that it's going to be too David Lynchian, and I'm just not a fan of his work. I know this movie goes a bit off the rails at the end with their decent into madness, but would you say the overall movie is Lynch like in that it's overall mostly incompressible and "weird for the sake of being weird"(I know it's not the best argument against his stuff, but still)?
I think so too but


the second half goes this route. I loved it and I love that general vibe, it makes me want to rewatch it, but it's not going to be for everyone, and if it's a thing that in the moment affects your enjoyment, I can see it retroactively affecting your overall opinion of the first half when it starts to fully descend

TL;DR if it's as much a turnoff as you make it sound like that type of stuff is for you, I don't think this is a film you'll end up liking
I would disagree. While there’s a lot of room for interpretation and symbolism, the literal surface events are grounded in logical A-B-C chain of events, with rational understandable reasons for everything that happens.
 

SillyEskimo

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
3,217
Well, it took 2 weeks until it was available in a local theater, but I saw it on Sunday afternoon in a packed theater (which I absolutely was not expecting). I watched it with a handful of friends that had never heard of it before, they just went with me based on my recommendation. As the movie was playing, I kind of felt the pressure of my recommendation on my shoulders. When the movie was over, the entire theater burst into whispered conversations. It was really cool. Thankfully, my friends *loved it*. During the first 10 minutes, one of my friends was thinking "Oh shit, is this one of those arthouse movies where no one is going to talk?" and was gutted thinking she had to sit there for another 1.5ish hours. But in the end she was completely enthralled with the movie. She had never heard of the Witch, so I gave her some homework ;)

Great film. Lots going on and a lot to take in/dissect. It's a rare movie that you can see with 6 people and everyone walks out with their own interpretation and they're all correct.
 

CesareNorrez

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,594
Dafoe’s character is Old Nan in GoT.

Didn’t particularly like the movie. Dafoe is great, but the other Tom’s act felt like attention-grabbing/award-baiting. Didn’t really believe how he went insane, and even Dafoe’s character is all over the place even if his performance was good. Overall too much forced melodrama, and the seagulls eating at Tom’s innards topped that off even more.
The actor’s themselves talk about the harsh conditions they had to work in and how it added to their performances. Stylistically it’s hard not to go big, which was 100% the intention. So it’s hard for me to see it as forced when everyone at the location was saying the environment naturally heightened the acting. The madness is easy to believe when the real world, safe conditions, pushed them to the edge.

Still I found plenty of subtle moments in the film, earlier on, and clear character development that pulled some of the melodrama back. At least enough where it justified the bigness of where they ended up.
 

Ether_Snake

Member
Oct 29, 2017
5,601
The actor’s themselves talk about the harsh conditions they had to work in and how it added to their performances. Stylistically it’s hard not to go big, which was 100% the intention. So it’s hard for me to see it as forced when everyone at the location was saying the environment naturally heightened the acting. The madness is easy to believe when the real world, safe conditions, pushed them to the edge.

Still I found plenty of subtle moments in the film, earlier on, and clear character development that pulled some of the melodrama back. At least enough where it justified the bigness of where they ended up.
I would have preferred more talking about their pasts, flashbacks, Tom in the woods in Canada, stuff like that, and a slow buildup to something more concrete. Felt too random to me, and could have been 15-20mins shorter. Too often the tension rises only for nothing to really happen other than something random.
 

CesareNorrez

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,594
I would have preferred more talking about their pasts, flashbacks, Tom in the woods in Canada, stuff like that, and a slow buildup to something more concrete. Felt too random to me, and could have been 15-20mins shorter. Too often the tension rises only for nothing to really happen other than something random.
Now that sounds boring to me (and verging on a completely different film). I think they talked about their pasts enough, and all we needed were small flashes to Tom's past. I can imagine the tension being deflated by any extended flashbacks or too much time away from the island. The tension came in waves building to a giant crash (quite literally at one point). As for leading to something more concrete, Tom finally reaching the top of the lighthouse and gazing upon the light was the climax. I can't imagine anything more definitive than that. His fate was inline with being mad: becoming a prisoner, tortured eternally. It was reminiscent of Kubrick's The Shining in many respects.

Interestingly, Eggers wanted to make the film about 10 minutes shorter. It would have required altering scenes so heavily that new/alternate footage would be needed. But he shoots so little coverage that there was no way that was possible. I believe the first cut of the film was somewhere between 5-10 minutes longer than the final cut.
 

Ether_Snake

Member
Oct 29, 2017
5,601
Now that sounds boring to me (and verging on a completely different film). I think they talked about their pasts enough, and all we needed were small flashes to Tom's past. I can imagine the tension being deflated by any extended flashbacks or too much time away from the island. The tension came in waves building to a giant crash (quite literally at one point). As for leading to something more concrete, Tom finally reaching the top of the lighthouse and gazing upon the light was the climax. I can't imagine anything more definitive than that. His fate was inline with being mad: becoming a prisoner, tortured eternally. It was reminiscent of Kubrick's The Shining in many respects.

Interestingly, Eggers wanted to make the film about 10 minutes shorter. It would have required altering scenes so heavily that new/alternate footage would be needed. But he shoots so little coverage that there was no way that was possible. I believe the first cut of the film was somewhere between 5-10 minutes longer than the final cut.
I don’t know. I don’t get why Tom would care that much about the light. Don’t get why he would go nuts over four weeks, other than how he is being treated which on its own felt really inconsistent. I just feel the movie was too random, could have benefited from more focus on who these two characters are and why they end up where they do. Too many scenes of Tom getting angry/crazy felt repetitive. Yelling a lot does not equal great acting either, it was overplayed. The Witch was far more consistent in its direction and how the plot unfolded. This felt like a movie Eggers would have made years before The Witch, which I felt was executed better at pretty much all levels.
 

SillyEskimo

The Fallen
Oct 26, 2017
3,217
Here's my take:

Dafoe killed his previous assistant. When Pattison pulled his head up in the lobster trap, he was missing an eye. The gull was missing the same eye. I think the assistant was reincarnated as the gull and was trying to warn Pattison about Dafoe. When he killed the gull, the curse went in full swing.

Also, at the end I think there was a godlike entity in the lighthouse that Dafoe had formed a spiritual relationship with over time. When Pattison finally saw it, he was overwhelmed, but it rejected him because he killed Dafoe. Even as Pattison lay dying, the expression on his face seemed as though he was more devastated by the rejection than getting eaten alive by seagulls.

Just spitballing.
 
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mattiewheels

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,013
When Tom is staring into the lens at the end, that insane few seconds is the most David Lynch thing I’ve ever seen that’s not done by Lynch. It’s so intense.
 

bremon

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,405
I would have preferred more talking about their pasts, flashbacks, Tom in the woods in Canada, stuff like that, and a slow buildup to something more concrete. Felt too random to me, and could have been 15-20mins shorter. Too often the tension rises only for nothing to really happen other than something random.
Flashbacks would have given us a reprieve from the claustrophobic lighthouse setting though. I think that would have made a weaker film. Better to have been stuck in the same place as young Tom the entire time I think.
 

ThisOne

Member
Oct 27, 2017
953
What's in the little pouch? There's a scene where Pattinson's character grabs it as he ascends the lighthouse stairs and then it shows up again on the table right before Pattinson gives Defoe the pickaxe to the chest.
 

HotHamBoy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
13,621
Here's my take:

Dafoe killed his previous assistant. When Pattison pulled his head up in the lobster trap, he was missing an eye. The gull was missing the same eye. I think the assistant was reincarnated as the gull and was trying to warn Pattison about Dafoe. When he killed the gull, the curse went in full swing.

Also, at the end I think there was a godlike entity in the lighthouse that Dafoe had formed a spiritual relationship with over time. When Pattison finally saw it, he was overwhelmed, but it rejected him because he killed Dafoe. Even as Pattison lay dying, the expression on his face seemed as though he was more devastated by the rejection than getting eaten alive by seagulls.

Just spitballing.
My take:

The entire movie is a metaphore about living with addiction, specifically alcoholism. I don't think any of the film's events are literal.

These thoughts are a bit scatter-shot since i just saw the movie a couple hours ago:

Pattinson got sick of trees. Forests of brown bottles. The man who's identity he is carrying? That's the man he was before he was washed away by the logs. He stood there and did nothing while he watched himself drown.

I think Pattinson is trying to dry out. 2 weeks to detox. He's isolated himself with his addiction, represented by Dafoe's old sea dog who pines for the days he sailed free on the sea and harrasses and berates him all day long, barking at him and demanding respect. At night, his addiction cozies up and tries to be friendly, tries to tempt him. To act as a balm for the "long night ahead."

Only two weeks...

The one-eyed gull represents the spectre of Tom's former addiction, or maybe his fear of addiction. They host the souls of "dead sailors" drowned at sea. Sometimes sailors call the ocean "the drink." After he chooses to eliminate their warning he gives into the literal drink. The weather changes.

He missed the boat right at the end. Downward spiral. Storms blow in. Ocean gets aggressive.

"Recommends severence without pay" despite working so hard? = all the pain and suffering of detox just to slip up at the end

The Lighthouse's light is the ultimate high the addict is forever in chase of. Knowledge of the Gods.

The final scene of Pattinson getting eaten alive by gulls is a specific reference to Prometheus, who's liver was eaten by eagles, only to be regrown and consumed again each day. In this case, the booze is eating Tom's liver.

The reason it turns out Dafoe and Pattinson are both named Tom is because they are two sides of the same person. It's living with your addiction. Pattinson wants to be straight and sober and Dafoe wants to get drunk and worship the god (the high) in the lighthouse. At the end, he has his addiction on a leash and he thinks he has control of it, thinks he can bury it. But he can't and it attacks him and when it does he is basically on a damned path.

The duality of the mermaid, beautiful and monstrous siren of the treacherous ocean, plays into this too. I'm still not clear on the symbolism of jerking off to the mermaid totem but Tom think's he's free of Dafoe's control when the human half that lives on land splits from the fish half that lives in the ocean.

My thoughts are still evolving but this is where I'm at right now.

It's an exact recreation of this drawing by Sascha Schneider:
"Hypnos is the God of Sleep, which he induces with purest opium smoked through a horn. Potentially also the God of Hyppies. He could also be the god of comas and dangerous addictions, for he works with his deadly brother Thanatos, the God of Death, for Hades Underworld Operations Inc."


Was Tom stuck there in limbo/purgatory/whatever because he killed the man whom's name he stole?

I also assume every single seagull is in fact Tom and his soul, hence why the one he killed was missing an eye? Showing everytime he's failed in his hell.
Yep! I noticed the seagull messing with him only had one eye just like Tom’s old partner who also had one eye. Also, I’m wondering if Tommy having his eyes burned and falling down the stairs was not only a Prometheus ending, but also relatable to the falling of Icarus?
Both are relevant, and don’t forget Sisyphus who had to roll a Boulder up a hill, only to have roll down, and do it all over again for eternity. Much like Tom bringing the oil can up the stairs.

Interestingly, Sisyphus was known as a violator of the Greek code of hospitality because he killed travelers and guests (Killing of the gull/Winslow).

Sisyphus was also something of a trickster and chained Hades(or Thanatos depending on version) up, cheating death.
I don’t know. I don’t get why Tom would care that much about the light. Don’t get why he would go nuts over four weeks, other than how he is being treated which on its own felt really inconsistent. I just feel the movie was too random, could have benefited from more focus on who these two characters are and why they end up where they do. Too many scenes of Tom getting angry/crazy felt repetitive. Yelling a lot does not equal great acting either, it was overplayed. The Witch was far more consistent in its direction and how the plot unfolded. This felt like a movie Eggers would have made years before The Witch, which I felt was executed better at pretty much all levels.
Lemme know what you guys think of what I wrote in this post...

What's in the little pouch? There's a scene where Pattinson's character grabs it as he ascends the lighthouse stairs and then it shows up again on the table right before Pattinson gives Defoe the pickaxe to the chest.
Cigarettes, i believe
 
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lasthope106

Member
Oct 25, 2017
665
Iowa USA
ye fancy my lobster?!

This was a great movie. It was such a damn shame that these two assholes sitting next to me kept fucking with their phone instead of letting me watch the movie in peace.

I will to re-watch it for sure.
 

Ether_Snake

Member
Oct 29, 2017
5,601
My take:

The entire movie is a metaphore about living with addiction, specifically alcoholism. I don't think any of the film's events are literal.

These thoughts are a bit scatter-shot since i just saw the movie a couple hours ago:

Pattinson got sick of trees. Forests of brown bottles. The man who's identity he is carrying? That's the man he was before he was washed away by the logs. He stood there and did nothing while he watched himself drown.

I think Pattinson is trying to dry out. 2 weeks to detox. He's isolated himself with his addiction, represented by Dafoe's old sea dog who pines for the days he sailed free on the sea and harrasses and berates him all day long, barking at him and demanding respect. At night, his addiction cozies up and tries to be friendly, tries to tempt him. To act as a balm for the "long night ahead."

Only two weeks...

The one-eyed gull represents the spectre of Tom's former addiction, or maybe his fear of addiction. They host the souls of "dead sailors" drowned at sea. Sometimes sailors call the ocean "the drink." After he chooses to eliminate their warning he gives into the literal drink. The weather changes.

He missed the boat right at the end. Downward spiral. Storms blow in. Ocean gets aggressive.

"Recommends severence without pay" despite working so hard? = all the pain and suffering of detox just to slip up at the end

The Lighthouse's light is the ultimate high the addict is forever in chase of. Knowledge of the Gods.

The final scene of Pattinson getting eaten alive by gulls is a specific reference to Prometheus, who's liver was eaten by eagles, only to be regrown and consumed again each day. In this case, the booze is eating Tom's liver.

The reason it turns out Dafoe and Pattinson are both named Tom is because they are two sides of the same person. It's living with your addiction. Pattinson wants to be straight and sober and Dafoe wants to get drunk and worship the god (the high) in the lighthouse. At the end, he has his addiction on a leash and he thinks he has control of it, thinks he can bury it. But he can't and it attacks him and when it does he is basically on a damned path.

The duality of the mermaid, beautiful and monstrous siren of the treacherous ocean, plays into this too. I'm still not clear on the symbolism of jerking off to the mermaid totem but Tom think's he's free of Dafoe's control when the human half that lives on land splits from the fish half that lives in the ocean.

My thoughts are still evolving but this is where I'm at right now.


"Hypnos is the God of Sleep, which he induces with purest opium smoked through a horn. Potentially also the God of Hyppies. He could also be the god of comas and dangerous addictions, for he works with his deadly brother Thanatos, the God of Death, for Hades Underworld Operations Inc."







Lemme know what you guys think of what I wrote in this post...


Cigarettes, i believe
Very interesting. I think if I knew in advance this was the subject I would have enjoyed it more. Should have driven that a little clearer at the start I think.

The mermaid could be just another addiction trying to get to him. Or the desire to have a woman/life but he can’t because he’s a mess, so she is half-fish because that’s the world he is stuck in.
 

smisk

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,265
I must be stupid as shit because I have a hard time getting any metaphor from this movie. I'm sure there was some deeper message intended but it's certainly beyond me. Excellent filmmaking and performances though.
 

HotHamBoy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
13,621
Very interesting. I think if I knew in advance this was the subject I would have enjoyed it more. Should have driven that a little clearer at the start I think.

The mermaid could be just another addiction trying to get to him. Or the desire to have a woman/life but he can’t because he’s a mess, so she is half-fish because that’s the world he is stuck in.
I think there is way more in the movie to support the theory/theme but I'd have to see it again and take notes from the start to catch it all.

I suspect that watching the movie again with that framing will make the metaphore obvious, beyond Dafoe literally trying to coerce Pattinson to drink for the first act of the film.

I think, though, that the movie is definitely not literal and therefore trying to make literal sense of a lot of the events and imagery is coming at it from the wrong angle.
 
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fade

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
1,323
I highly recommend the game The Return of the Obra Dinn if you enjoyed some of the themes and symbolism in this movie.
 

abellwillring

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,127
Austin, TX
That scene of Dafoe cursing out Young Tom, talking about a trident in his gullet, is one of the most epic scenes in a movie I've seen in years. He deserves an Oscar for that alone.
This is a truly amazing scene. The way it's lit with the shadows on his face and eyes is really incredible. The scene with him in the grave was also amazing -- I figured that was just like some sort of baked good crumbled or something fun and edible. From an interview I read with Eggers.. I did not get that impression.

In general though, I did not like this movie. I wouldn't say that I disliked it.. but I can't conceivably recommend it to anyone. It's ambitious and technically impressive but the movie itself was simply not enjoyable at all. Interesting to read some people's thoughts in this thread though.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,354
Ontario
What's your father/son read?
I mean to me on one level the movie is about power dynamics. Old Tom is like a father/god type; imperious, demanding and unreceptive. Young Tom is like the son/human; lost, put upon and covetous of the role of the father.

I feel like this is reinforced through the love that clearly grows in the midst of their otherwise resentful relationship. I read it more as a familial thing as opposed to a homoerotic affection but I certainly think there's a conversation to be had on that front.

I don't really think the movie is about any one thing though. In the spirit of the great modernists (Nabokov comes to mind) The Lighthouse to me is really about everything that people read into it, stacking several thematic elements on top of each other without compromising the flow of the story.
 

HotHamBoy

Member
Oct 27, 2017
13,621
I mean to me on one level the movie is about power dynamics. Old Tom is like a father/god type; imperious, demanding and unreceptive. Young Tom is like the son/human; lost, put upon and covetous of the role of the father.

I feel like this is reinforced through the love that clearly grows in the midst of their otherwise resentful relationship. I read it more as a familial thing as opposed to a homoerotic affection but I certainly think there's a conversation to be had on that front.

I don't really think the movie is about any one thing though. In the spirit of the great modernists (Nabokov comes to mind) The Lighthouse to me is really about everything that people read into it, stacking several thematic elements on top of each other without compromising the flow of the story.
For sure.

Eggers said Tarkovsky is his biggest influence here (and that he thinks Tarkovsky would hate his movies lol)
 
Feb 16, 2018
1,191
Amazing film, the performances and atmosphere were top notch. Another top notch horror from Eggers, excited to see where he goes. That mermaid scream sent chills down my body holy shit.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,939
For sure.

Eggers said Tarkovsky is his biggest influence here (and that he thinks Tarkovsky would hate his movies lol)
I'm actually finally going to watch Stalker this weekend, so pretty excited to see if my appreciation of Eggers' style carries over to Tarkovsky

Also Metropolis too. I'm the mood for some stunning classic black-and-white
 

Zombine

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,258
You guys have no idea how happy it made me that Pattinson has that draw to pull young people into theaters to see these sort of art house experiences. When I went to my local indie theater to watch this, I was impressed with the amount of younger 20-somethings there to watch this, who left glowing about the film.
 

CesareNorrez

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,594
If we are recommending movies, I’ll add Last Year at Marienbad. It’s more dreamy and does not share the intensity, but I think they may make an interesting double feature.
 

More_Badass

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,939
You guys have no idea how happy it made me that Pattinson has that draw to pull young people into theaters to see these sort of art house experiences. When I went to my local indie theater to watch this, I was impressed with the amount of younger 20-somethings there to watch this, who left glowing about the film.
Where‘s your local theater? The IFC in Manhattan is like right around the corner from NYU, so it might be a location thing rather than the pull of the actor
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,025
My take:

The entire movie is a metaphore about living with addiction, specifically alcoholism. I don't think any of the film's events are literal.

These thoughts are a bit scatter-shot since i just saw the movie a couple hours ago:

Pattinson got sick of trees. Forests of brown bottles. The man who's identity he is carrying? That's the man he was before he was washed away by the logs. He stood there and did nothing while he watched himself drown.

I think Pattinson is trying to dry out. 2 weeks to detox. He's isolated himself with his addiction, represented by Dafoe's old sea dog who pines for the days he sailed free on the sea and harrasses and berates him all day long, barking at him and demanding respect. At night, his addiction cozies up and tries to be friendly, tries to tempt him. To act as a balm for the "long night ahead."

Only two weeks...

The one-eyed gull represents the spectre of Tom's former addiction, or maybe his fear of addiction. They host the souls of "dead sailors" drowned at sea. Sometimes sailors call the ocean "the drink." After he chooses to eliminate their warning he gives into the literal drink. The weather changes.

He missed the boat right at the end. Downward spiral. Storms blow in. Ocean gets aggressive.

"Recommends severence without pay" despite working so hard? = all the pain and suffering of detox just to slip up at the end

The Lighthouse's light is the ultimate high the addict is forever in chase of. Knowledge of the Gods.

The final scene of Pattinson getting eaten alive by gulls is a specific reference to Prometheus, who's liver was eaten by eagles, only to be regrown and consumed again each day. In this case, the booze is eating Tom's liver.

The reason it turns out Dafoe and Pattinson are both named Tom is because they are two sides of the same person. It's living with your addiction. Pattinson wants to be straight and sober and Dafoe wants to get drunk and worship the god (the high) in the lighthouse. At the end, he has his addiction on a leash and he thinks he has control of it, thinks he can bury it. But he can't and it attacks him and when it does he is basically on a damned path.

The duality of the mermaid, beautiful and monstrous siren of the treacherous ocean, plays into this too. I'm still not clear on the symbolism of jerking off to the mermaid totem but Tom think's he's free of Dafoe's control when the human half that lives on land splits from the fish half that lives in the ocean.

My thoughts are still evolving but this is where I'm at right now.
I just want to say, that is such an interesting take that makes a lot of sense!
 

Jedi2016

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,996
Just got back. Turned to the guy sitting next to me at the theater and said "Well, that was different." (which is exactly what I was expecting when I went in there, so that's perfectly fine)

Definitely some next-level shit going on, more than just a simple tale of two lighthouse keepers. Somebody smarter than me needs to put together a three-hour breakdown of all the themes and nuance going on.

Willem Dafoe's speech in the middle was a pleasure to behold, I was grinning ear to ear. And like someone else said, I lost track of what he was saying when he was getting buried, amazed that he was still going and Dafoe was still 110% in character.

Pattinson put in a good performance to be sure, and it's clear that both of them really believed in the story they were telling, but Dafoe's performance was fucking epic.

Well worth seeing. I think that might have been my theater's last showing, and there only about half a dozen people in there with me.
 

Bigwombat

Member
Nov 30, 2018
1,425
Just got back. Turned to the guy sitting next to me at the theater and said "Well, that was different." (which is exactly what I was expecting when I went in there, so that's perfectly fine)

Definitely some next-level shit going on, more than just a simple tale of two lighthouse keepers. Somebody smarter than me needs to put together a three-hour breakdown of all the themes and nuance going on.

Willem Dafoe's speech in the middle was a pleasure to behold, I was grinning ear to ear. And like someone else said, I lost track of what he was saying when he was getting buried, amazed that he was still going and Dafoe was still 110% in character.

Pattinson put in a good performance to be sure, and it's clear that both of them really believed in the story they were telling, but Dafoe's performance was fucking epic.

Well worth seeing. I think that might have been my theater's last showing, and there only about half a dozen people in there with me.
There was only 4 of us in the theater I saw it at today. I turned to the couple as we were walking out and said well that was a movie.
I'm not saying I didn't like it but I had laugh when there was another decapitated head in an A24 movie.
Plus that mermaid puss! Funny some of you wrote people walked out when Tom was masterbating. We've all fapped to worse things than little statues. Can't believe people are such prudes
 

supervga

Storyboard Artist - Netflix
Verified
Oct 27, 2017
900
Saw it last night and I was cracking up this morning remembering the "but you liked my lobster!" bit.
I was not ready how funny the film is and it took me a while to adjust. Could be giving Parasite a run for its money.

 

RustyNails

Banned
Oct 26, 2017
10,677
I saw the movie last night, and I've had a bit of time to reflect and gather thoughts.

Everyone is free to interpret movie as they fit and mine is no more valid than anyone else's. With that said, I think the movie was about guilt, and it's overarching, overbearing weight on your soul. Ephraim watched a logger die, and didn't help him. After he died, Ephraim did not feel anything and just lit up a cigarette. There is no such thing as "start a new life" when you are chased by your demons, and the idea is that you're not going to find any escape. No matter what you do, you cannot clean away guilt or someone's conscience, as portrayed by Ephraim's dutiful scrubbing and cleaning of the lighthouse. He expects the guilt to be washed away, and demands that it does from all his hardwork. It really doesn't work like that. The seagulls represent Ephraim's guilt and past and they constantly bother him to no end, and in the end, guilt literally eats him away.

The Lighthouse represents this opportunity to start new, make money, and retire. The Lighthouse itself is a character in the movie, foreboding, terrifying yet enigmatic.

The mermaid stuff, greek mythos and allegory is explained by better minds than me already. The sexual imagery, I dont even wanna touch lol. But if I can use one word, it's "delirium". Ephraim is an unreliable narrator so what do you really believe? Is anything you're watching really real? Dude's drinking water spiked with kerosene. In that sense the movie is spiritually similar to The VVitch, because you could make the argument that the puritan family is hallucinating serious shit because of the rot. I dont think Dafoe's Thomas is fake, or is older Ephraim, etc. I think he was real, and liked to be alone in that light tower for whatever reason, and Ephraim wanted to be in that tower too because he saw that as the end of his journey of redemption. It is not. There is no redemption. Just more misery.
 

Bronx-Man

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
14,963
We talk about Wake’s monologue calling upon Triton but holy shit at Howard’s calling out Wake and everything he hated about him. Phenomenal film.
 
Oct 26, 2017
9,434
Film of the year for me, absolutely beautiful
Walking out of the theater, The Lighthouse was just okay. It's stuck with me though, much like The Witch, and I can't stop thinking about it. Seeing you say it is your film of the year makes me realize that Hell......it might be mine too now. It just keeps growing on me the more I think about it, and I like it more and more.
 

Rassilon

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,178
UK
Walking out of the theater, The Lighthouse was just okay. It's stuck with me though, much like The Witch, and I can't stop thinking about it. Seeing you say it is your film of the year makes me realize that Hell......it might be mine too now. It just keeps growing on me the more I think about it, and I like it more and more.
i was grinning like an idiot all the way through, just ticked all my boxes

I was reminded also of the classic Doctor Who episode ‘The Horror of Fang Rock’, leading me to surmise a Rutan was responsible for all shenanigans.
 
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