Uber says drivers not core to its businesses to combat CA law

samoyed

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,887
I feel like ridesharing is here to stay so cities should just integrate it into their infrastructure rather than forcing cabs onto people.
 

samoyed

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,887
Even if the AI magic sauce is ready in 3-5 years, the amount of regulative hullaballoo it would take to get them on to the roads of places like LA, SF and NYC would take 10+ years. One fatality is all that needs to happen for every customer to immediately turn on Uber and tell them to bring back their "non-core" human drivers.
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,228
A core element is one that when removed the business either fails or can no longer function as they previously did. Remove the drivers, and Uber no longer functions at all.
 

finalflame

Product Management
Verified
Oct 27, 2017
2,563
Not so sure about "soon", also pissing off the systems that you're going to need approval from to be driverless seems pretty moronic.
It does, and yet, they have been doing it incessantly since their inception. Time will tell who that's invested into the self driving future will actually make it.
Time will tell if people will trust self driving tech to at the very least not kill them, but also figure out weird corner cases that happen with pickups/dropoffs.

Also is a self-driving car gonna walk the Uber Eats deliveries up those apartments and office buildings?
Generally speaking most food delivery companies have invested heavily into the paradigm that you're supposed to meet them outside/downstairs, although I think Uber Eats generally is one of the ones that doesn't. I don't actually use any of Uber's services. With Postmates, at least, they pretty heavily suggest meeting the driver outside.
More like 30-50 years. Driverless AI has a long, looooong way to go, and getting them legally on the road in significant numbers is even further out. And that's not even factoring in the morality and ethics questions of how the AIs are programmed to manage risk and fatalities. I will be mildly surprised if there are a significant number of driverless cars on the road regularly in my lifetime.
I think you’ll be surprised then. 30-50 years is off by an order of magnitude.
 

Rover

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,107
It does, and yet, they have been doing it incessantly since their inception. Time will tell who that's invested into the self driving future will actually make it.

Generally speaking most food delivery companies have invested heavily into the paradigm that you're supposed to meet them outside/downstairs, although I think Uber Eats generally is one of the ones that doesn't. I don't actually use any of Uber's services. With Postmates, at least, they pretty heavily suggest meeting the driver outside.
Where do you live? In NYC it really seems like the expectation is for them to come to the door / go upstairs with exception for more secure office locations.

Not saying it's how it should be, but an automated system seems like it'd require you to go outside and meet the robot at the curb and that's a huge shift in service.
 

samoyed

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,887
SV hasn't solved the last few steps problem of automated delivery yet and I doubt they'll solve it in the near future. More likely buildings will begin to hire dedicated porters to accept deliveries from robot cars and take them up to doors.
 

gcubed

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,150
I feel like ridesharing is here to stay so cities should just integrate it into their infrastructure rather than forcing cabs onto people.
It's here to stay because a company is losing billions of dollars a quarter by offering rides at a huge loss. They have the scum of the taxi business with extra exploitation of workers.

Taxis suck too, but competing against a company that offers a service for less than the service costs is.. difficult
 

samoyed

Member
Oct 26, 2017
9,887
It's here to stay because a company is losing billions of dollars a quarter by offering rides at a huge loss. They have the scum of the taxi business with extra exploitation of workers.

Taxis suck too, but competing against a company that offers a service for less than the service costs is.. difficult
Yes, I mean people want the convenience of the app and the drivers appreciate the gig even if the gig economy can go die in a fire. Convert the taxi industry into a municipal ridesharing industry and turn the drivers into de-facto federal workers, imo.