UK coronavirus discussion. “Stay at home. Protect the NHS. Save lives.”

Blent

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,290
East Midlands, England, UK
I work in the NHS as a charity fundraiser.

This week, we launched a special fund to help provide frontline staff with non-critical supplies - food, snacks, tea and biscuits, stuff for their convenience and to help boost morale during the hardest challenge they'll ever face.

I'm glad to say we've had thousands of pounds worth of donations so far.

But what I've found very interesting is that at least 80% of the donations have come from the British-Asian community. At least, that's what I'm assuming from the names of the donors. A vast majority of donations from people whose names suggest they have Indian, Pakistani, Chinese heritage or have roots in other Asian nations.

Not that I'm surprised by this, but given the relentless demonisation of British-Asians over the decades from certain areas of our society, it just makes me want to tell the world how generous they're being during a great national crisis.
 

jem

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,182
So the government is overlooking medical manufacturers to award the contract to Dyson and JCB, two tory donors. Nothing dodgy going on there.

Can those medical manufacturers achieve the scale required in such a short timeframe though?

Dyson is also working with a medical company to design these ventilators.
 

Temascos

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,256
Went to the local shop this morning, and while I was able to get some things the lack of space between people gave me a massive anxiety attack and now I have to reset the clock from when I was last close to someone. I will know by April 9th if I have Covid-19 or not now. Massively frustrating.
 

Aldi

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,062
United Kingdom
I've never ordered food online in my life.

Gave Morrisons a go this morning and have no idea what i'm suppose to be doing. i got trough the queue, only to be met with another queue once i hit checkout.

My wife informed me today that they are installing perspex screens in my local Aldi to shield the people on check out. I'll try to get in later on in the week, but they now have stick policies on how many people can be in the store at one time and the queues are long.
 
Dec 2, 2017
7,796
I've never ordered food online in my life.

Gave Morrisons a go this morning and have no idea what i'm suppose to be doing. i got trough the queue, only to be met with another queue once i hit checkout.

My wife informed me today that they are installing perspex screens in my local Aldi to shield the people on check out. I'll try to get in later on in the week, but they now have stick policies on how many people can be in the store at one time and the queues are long.
Thats not normally how it works, but right now there is queues for the queues, unfortunately. You might also get substitutions for some items you ordered, depending on the availability of what you ordered.


I've submitted that volunteering form for NHS volunteers. They probably have all they need with 400,000 odd already, but I can drive and talk on a phone if they can make use of me.
 

Superimposer

Member
Nov 21, 2017
26
Just to add to what others have already said on the previous page regarding the lower number of deaths yesterday. There has been some optimism around the number, but it's frankly unfounded. The number of deaths yesterday would be a function of the number of new cases 10-14 days ago. We have seen how the daily cases have evolved since then. The number of daily deaths is definitely nowhere near peaking - in fact it is likely several times below the peak. The thing that we should be watching is new daily cases rather than deaths, and these have reached new highs the past two days. These themselves are reflecting infections that happened a week prior, so even if the lockdown were 100% effective the new daily cases would be increasing until next week.
 

coldsagging

Member
Oct 27, 2017
680
Article in The Times saying the NHS should actually cope now according to one expert, and he thinks the fatality figure will be way below 20,000.

Can't read it as it's behind a pay wall but fingers crossed.
 

Aldi

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,062
United Kingdom
I volunteered for a local animal sanctuary. Apparently a lot of the staff that work there are elderly and/or vulnerable so shouldn't be going in, so i'll be going in 3 times a week to feed and walk the dogs.
 
Last edited:

Jiminy

Avenger
Mar 29, 2018
4,799
Went to the local shop this morning, and while I was able to get some things the lack of space between people gave me a massive anxiety attack and now I have to reset the clock from when I was last close to someone. I will know by April 9th if I have Covid-19 or not now. Massively frustrating.
Sorry to hear it spiked your anxiety.

Local shops are honestly a minefield. You never know if it'll be quiet and fine or if it'll be humming with people.

For that reason I only go to larger supermarkets at the moment, as much as I prefer smaller shops.
- automated doors. No touching/pushing
- much more space, easier to avoid people
- self-service checkouts
- much more produce, less likely others have touched it
 

Fatoy

Member
Mar 13, 2019
2,138
Can those medical manufacturers achieve the scale required in such a short timeframe though?

Dyson is also working with a medical company to design these ventilators.
Yeah, specialist manufacturing tends to be slow because it's specialised and therefore high-speed, high-volume isn't usually required. Normally I'd be inclined to say that this is a sly government back-hander to Dyson, but in this case it's more likely to be that they could scale faster than the specialists could.
 

MrKlaw

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,823
I'm luckily not massively impacted by this. I've been wfh for almost three weeks now, and my wife started this week. My kids had their exams cancelled but overall it could be worse.

However, my work is really busy - work in video on demand services which are obviously increasing in use at the moment. So my (super first world) niggle is all the radio people and press talking about what to do with all your free time and how to keep busy. Vanessa on the radio telling me three times 'I've got plenty of time now to do X' - no I bloody haven't!
 

Temascos

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,256
Sorry to hear it spiked your anxiety.

Local shops are honestly a minefield. You never know if it'll be quiet and fine or if it'll be humming with people.

For that reason I only go to larger supermarkets at the moment, as much as I prefer smaller shops.
- automated doors. No touching/pushing
- much more space, easier to avoid people
- self-service checkouts
- much more produce, less likely others have touched it
Yeah, I wanted to go to the local store as it opens earlier than the big stores (At 7am) and I initially made a good choice to go when I did, but it suddenly filled up with people when I was at the back of the shop grabbing milk and there was literally no possible way I could get around them as I was boxed in. To be fair on everyone they weren't coughing, being pushy and were wearing gloves and masks so that helps.

I'll stick to the larger stores in the future, that's if I'm not dead or hospitalised by then.
 

MrKlaw

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,823
I've never ordered food online in my life.

Gave Morrisons a go this morning and have no idea what i'm suppose to be doing. i got trough the queue, only to be met with another queue once i hit checkout.

My wife informed me today that they are installing perspex screens in my local Aldi to shield the people on check out. I'll try to get in later on in the week, but they now have stick policies on how many people can be in the store at one time and the queues are long.
online is a mare. Tried ocado this morning - 1hr queue to get into the app, then there are no slots available. Surely there are only a few slots in my area anyway, so they could quickly know when those are taken and just tell me quickly and we'll go away? Thousands hanging on for no reason doesn't help us, and doesn't help the site's capacity issues either?

Feels like with Sainsbury going mostly to vulnerable/at need people, others will follow so the healthy/low risk groups will likelly need to go to physical supermarkets. I'd only been to one so far and people were just brushing past you with no distancing at all. Our house has pretty much been isolated for two weeks now (kids only off for a week so not perfect), so it freaked me out how little people seemed to care about that. I don't mind going to a physical shop but I want to keep my distance. Tesco does look like its putting mesures in place so hopefully that improves by next week when we need to go again
 

LewieP

Banned
Oct 26, 2017
10,841

jem

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,182
Yeah, specialist manufacturing tends to be slow because it's specialised and therefore high-speed, high-volume isn't usually required. Normally I'd be inclined to say that this is a sly government back-hander to Dyson, but in this case it's more likely to be that they could scale faster than the specialists could.
Exactly.

And to be fair to them, Dyson (the company) has a lot of expertise when it comes to things like airflow, power/control systems and manufacturing.
 

Aprikurt

Member
Oct 29, 2017
6,598
I'm meant to be monitoring the work the students are doing at home... problem is, a lot of them just aren't doing it.
 

Guppeth

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,662
Sheffield, UK
I went to Tesco yesterday and they had good measures in place, plenty of (most) products, and weren't too busy. I waited until after 10am, because 9-10am they prioritise vulnerable groups. I saw no reason to get there at opening time, because that's when a queue is most likely and I don't care if some products sell out by the time I get there.

Things I wanted but couldn't get: pasta and paracetamol. Yeah I party hard.
 

TheZjman

Member
Nov 22, 2018
782
Sorry to hear it spiked your anxiety.

Local shops are honestly a minefield. You never know if it'll be quiet and fine or if it'll be humming with people.

For that reason I only go to larger supermarkets at the moment, as much as I prefer smaller shops.
- automated doors. No touching/pushing
- much more space, easier to avoid people
- self-service checkouts
- much more produce, less likely others have touched it
That's a fair point - usually we shop at tesco but we've been going to our local co-op early in the morning and so far whilst we haven't been able to get everything we want and paying over the odds we were at least avoiding people, but the way you've explained it there also makes sense.
 

Redcrayon

Zoinks!
Moderator
Oct 27, 2017
7,137
Article in The Times saying the NHS should actually cope now according to one expert, and he thinks the fatality figure will be way below 20,000.

Can't read it as it's behind a pay wall but fingers crossed.
I saw that mentioned in Boris’s briefing yesterday, the papers leaped on it

(Guardian summary)
  • The coronavirus strain on the NHS is likely to peak in three weeks’ time, the Commons science committee heard. Prof Neil Ferguson said he was confident the NHS would be able to cope with the epidemic.
 

phisheep

Member
Oct 26, 2017
976
Not a priority they said...

And she wasn't.

We will have many more of these stories before this is all over, but we can't go handwringing over every one. The NHS is not blessed with foresight as to who will die, it is blessed only with statistics and the knowledge of local capacity to set what priorities it best can.

Yes it sucks, but this is the nature of the pandemic we are faced with.
 

Guppeth

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,662
Sheffield, UK
That's a fair point - usually we shop at tesco but we've been going to our local co-op early in the morning and so far whilst we haven't been able to get everything we want and paying over the odds we were at least avoiding people, but the way you've explained it there also makes sense.
I decided to go to Tesco instead of the small local shop I used last week. The small shop is really cramped, and while they're being careful it's not easy to give people enough space.

I feel bad for not sticking with the local shop though. They've gone above and beyond, rationing items (and sticking to it despite abusive customers), lowering prices, and doing home delivery for vulnerable people. Legends. But my priority is to avoid proximity to others.
 

Aprikurt

Member
Oct 29, 2017
6,598
And she wasn't.

We will have many more of these stories before this is all over, but we can't go handwringing over every one. The NHS is not blessed with foresight as to who will die, it is blessed only with statistics and the knowledge of local capacity to set what priorities it best can.

Yes it sucks, but this is the nature of the pandemic we are faced with.
This is all very pragmatic, but yeah, we absolutely can. This is a 36 year old woman.
 
Last edited:

Blent

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,290
East Midlands, England, UK
And she wasn't.

We will have many more of these stories before this is all over, but we can't go handwringing over every one. The NHS is not blessed with foresight as to who will die, it is blessed only with statistics and the knowledge of local capacity to set what priorities it best can.

Yes it sucks, but this is the nature of the pandemic we are faced with.
Also further emphasizes that we can't afford cavalier attitudes to the virus no matter who we are or what the status of our health is.
 

jem

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,182
Also further emphasizes that we can't afford cavalier attitudes to the virus no matter who we are or what the status of our health is.
Someone needs to contact that stupid bloody women who went to the beach and "popped in to visit her friend" and tell her this. I wonder what her response will be then...
 

Kyuuji

Member
Nov 8, 2017
10,303
The only aspect to keep in mind with this report as it's being spread like wildfire is that it's her Aunt who's saying that she had no underlying medical issues not medical staff. It's obviously virulent and dangerous to younger people but the media have run with this headline and made it seem more concrete than it might be.
Officials are yet to confirm the death and the circumstances surrounding it.
 

Aprikurt

Member
Oct 29, 2017
6,598
The only aspect to keep in mind with this report as it's being spread like wildfire is that it's her Aunt who's saying that she had no underlying medical issues not medical staff.

Ah I apologise, didn't see that. The BBC need to be more careful. Got to say, their reporting of this whole thing has been pretty lackluster.
 

Teddy

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,168
Article in The Times saying the NHS should actually cope now according to one expert, and he thinks the fatality figure will be way below 20,000.

Can't read it as it's behind a pay wall but fingers crossed.
It’s the Times, it’s basically a mouth piece for the Conservative party.

Unless the NHS gets more ICU or ventilators within a couple weeks I’d doubt that claim.
 

RedSparrows

Member
Feb 22, 2019
2,748
The only aspect to keep in mind with this report as it's being spread like wildfire is that it's her Aunt who's saying that she had no underlying medical issues not medical staff. It's obviously virulent and dangerous to younger people but the media have run with this headline and made it seem more concrete than it might be.

Aye, I mean, I am no medic, but what dictates how severely one gets this other than age and pre-existing conditions? Why would it apparantly randomly and rarely severely hit someone in a demographic that is otherwise largely safe from the worst outcomes?


It’s the Times, it’s basically a mouth piece for the Conservative party.

Unless the NHS gets more ICU or ventilators within a couple weeks I’d doubt that claim.
Do you have any reason to doubt the claim particularly beyond the newspaper it's reported in? I'm not saying I know anything, but essentially saying 'fake news' because the Times leans Tory isn't much of a reason.
 

Aprikurt

Member
Oct 29, 2017
6,598
A lot of people think this will be over after the Easter holidays by the way. Apparently the fact exams were cancelled and we were told things were off "for the forseeable future" isn't resonating with them.
 

Oregano

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,580
A lot of people think this will be over after the Easter holidays by the way. Apparently the fact exams were cancelled and we were told things were off "for the forseeable future" isn't resonating with them.
At work we're operating under the assumption that we won't return to "normal" operations until July.
 

Fatoy

Member
Mar 13, 2019
2,138
It’s the Times, it’s basically a mouth piece for the Conservative party.

Unless the NHS gets more ICU or ventilators within a couple weeks I’d doubt that claim.
They are opening temporary hospitals in conference centres across the country, and industry is currently gearing up to manufacture ventilators at scale.

I'm not saying I agree with the prediction that the death toll will fall beneath that 20k threshold (it probably won't) but both of the things you say need to happen are happening to some degree.
 

Fatoy

Member
Mar 13, 2019
2,138
A lot of people think this will be over after the Easter holidays by the way. Apparently the fact exams were cancelled and we were told things were off "for the forseeable future" isn't resonating with them.
My wife and I were having a discussion this morning, and we're both of the opinion that there's zero chance of schools going back this academic year. I do wonder if we might see schools re-opening in what would normally have been the summer holidays, though - i.e. July and August. Exams are obviously canned, but kids who aren't in exam years will still need the curriculum to be covered as far as possible.

I seem to remember you being a teacher or working in a school, so no doubt you know way more about this than my amateur guesswork.
 

limerobot

Member
Apr 26, 2019
946
There is no way schools, colleges or universities are opening for students before September.

all of our teaching/ assessments are now online, there is no reason for students to come in now.
 

Aprikurt

Member
Oct 29, 2017
6,598
My wife and I were having a discussion this morning, and we're both of the opinion that there's zero chance of schools going back this academic year. I do wonder if we might see schools re-opening in what would normally have been the summer holidays, though - i.e. July and August. Exams are obviously canned, but kids who aren't in exam years will still need the curriculum to be covered as far as possible.

I seem to remember you being a teacher or working in a school, so no doubt you know way more about this than my amateur guesswork.

Haven't got the foggiest mate. We've certainly been prepped as if September is the next time we'll be back to "normal", but who knows.

To be honest if the world is safe enough for kids to go back in July/August, they'd have a hell of an uproar from the unions if they tried to start school then, probably from parents who are trying to get a holiday in too. September is the safest bet.
 

Wilson

Member
Oct 27, 2017
473
My wife and I were having a discussion this morning, and we're both of the opinion that there's zero chance of schools going back this academic year. I do wonder if we might see schools re-opening in what would normally have been the summer holidays, though - i.e. July and August. Exams are obviously canned, but kids who aren't in exam years will still need the curriculum to be covered as far as possible.

I seem to remember you being a teacher or working in a school, so no doubt you know way more about this than my amateur guesswork.
Scottish perspective - There is literally 0 chance of kids coming in before the end of the summer holidays in August.

It would be a total organisational nightmare to try and cut the summer holidays, and the headache isn't worth the effort.