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US approved thousands of child bride immigration requests

Fiction

Fanthropologist
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
1,747
#1
Keep in mind, these are immigration requests not the usual child bride issue America has.

https://www.apnews.com/19e43295c76d4d249aa51c9f643eb377

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of requests by men to bring in child and adolescent brides to live in the United States were approved over the past decade, according to government data obtained by The Associated Press. In one case, a 49-year-old man applied for admission for a 15-year-old girl.

The approvals are legal: The Immigration and Nationality Act does not set minimum age requirements. And in weighing petitions for spouses or fiancees, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services goes by whether the marriage is legal in the home country and then whether the marriage would be legal in the state where the petitioner lives.


But the data raises questions about whether the immigration system may be enabling forced marriage and about how U.S. laws may be compounding the problem despite efforts to limit child and forced marriage. Marriage between adults and minors is not uncommon in the United States, and most states allow children to marry with some restrictions.
Lots more at the link.
This is horrifying. What the fuck are we doing?
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,591
#3
Yikes! I found this on Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_marriage_in_the_United_States#In_the_50_states

The general age of marriage is 18 in every state, with the exception of Nebraska (19) and Mississippi (21).

However, every state except Delaware and New Jersey allows exceptions to their general age of marriage in one or more of the following cases:

  • Consent of a court clerk or judge (sometimes the consent of a superior court judge, rather than a local judge, is required)
  • Consent of the parents or legal guardians of the minor
  • If one of the parties is pregnant
  • If the minor has given birth to a child
  • If the minor is emancipated
So, given one or more of these exceptions, as of January 2019:

  • 17 states have no minimum age of marriage in some cases.
  • 2 states have a minimum age of 14.
  • 5 states have a minimum age of 15.
  • 19 states have a minimum age of 16.
  • 7 states have a minimum age of 17.
 
OP
OP
Fiction

Fiction

Fanthropologist
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
1,747
#6
Yikes! I found this on Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_marriage_in_the_United_States#In_the_50_states

The general age of marriage is 18 in every state, with the exception of Nebraska (19) and Mississippi (21).

However, every state except Delaware and New Jersey allows exceptions to their general age of marriage in one or more of the following cases:

  • Consent of a court clerk or judge (sometimes the consent of a superior court judge, rather than a local judge, is required)
  • Consent of the parents or legal guardians of the minor
  • If one of the parties is pregnant
  • If the minor has given birth to a child
  • If the minor is emancipated
So, given one or more of these exceptions, as of January 2019:

  • 17 states have no minimum age of marriage in some cases.
  • 2 states have a minimum age of 14.
  • 5 states have a minimum age of 15.
  • 19 states have a minimum age of 16.
  • 7 states have a minimum age of 17.
So according to this, some guy could go over seas, 'get' a child bride of 14, and legally be able to bring her back with him.

I'm going to be sick.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,591
#7
So according to this, some guy could go over seas, 'get' a child bride of 14, and legally be able to bring her back with him.

I'm going to be sick.
Yeah, those exceptions are so backwards. When setting a minimum age there's a reason. Making exceptions for it is not needed. It's like children being tried as adults. If you're going to do that why have a line of delineation in the first place?
 
Nov 2, 2017
1,211
Outside
#8
Independent.co.uk Kentucky: Child marriage ban delayed after opposition from conservative group, 5 March 2018

"Politicians in Kentucky are stepping up their fight to end child marriage in the state after a planned vote on the matter was postponed because of opposition from a conservative group.

Under current law, 16 and 17-year-olds can marry with their parents’ permission. Any age under 16 can also get wed, as long as they are pregnant and marrying the father of their child.

A new bill that would prohibit anyone aged 16 or under from marrying and prevent any 17-year old from tying the knot without the approval of a judge, who would have to be convinced that the minor is mature, self-sufficient and not being coerced into marriage.
Read more

A 17-year-old would also be prevented from marrying someone who is more than four years their senior.

Nationwide, more than 200,000 children under 18 – some as young as 10 – were married between 2000 and 2015. In most cases, the minor is a girl and her spouse is an older man."

The American Talibans are gross as hell.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,041
#10
So, given one or more of these exceptions, as of January 2019:

  • 17 states have no minimum age of marriage in some cases.
  • 2 states have a minimum age of 14.
  • 5 states have a minimum age of 15.
  • 19 states have a minimum age of 16.
  • 7 states have a minimum age of 17.
christ.
 
Nov 3, 2017
3,488
#13
Yikes! I found this on Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Child_marriage_in_the_United_States#In_the_50_states

The general age of marriage is 18 in every state, with the exception of Nebraska (19) and Mississippi (21).

However, every state except Delaware and New Jersey allows exceptions to their general age of marriage in one or more of the following cases:

  • Consent of a court clerk or judge (sometimes the consent of a superior court judge, rather than a local judge, is required)
  • Consent of the parents or legal guardians of the minor
  • If one of the parties is pregnant
  • If the minor has given birth to a child
  • If the minor is emancipated
So, given one or more of these exceptions, as of January 2019:

  • 17 states have no minimum age of marriage in some cases.
  • 2 states have a minimum age of 14.
  • 5 states have a minimum age of 15.
  • 19 states have a minimum age of 16.
  • 7 states have a minimum age of 17.
Wait, is there a minimum age requirement for the pregnant/birth of a child case? A 12 year old "could" marry an adult just because she is pregnant?
That's like the comic about prostitution and porn-movies (paying sex-workers is legal if they are doing a movie)

State: "you want to marry a 12-year-old? Are you out of your fucking mind? You should be behind bars"
Adult: "she is carrying my child."
State: "Oh, Ok."

State: "You raped this girl! You will rot in prison!"
Adult: "she is pregnant with my child"
State: "And?"
Adult: "I will marry her."
State: "Oh, Ok, sign here."
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,200
#20
I read the thread title and thought to myself, this is gonna be absolutely terrible.

Yup. We're the baddies :/.

Edit:
I'm Canadian though, not sure what the rules are here though.
 

Kappa

Banned
Member
Oct 27, 2017
332
#22
If you are wondering why there is no rush to shut down the concentration camps we have for the kids. This is part of it
 

Morrigan

Armoring
Moderator
Oct 24, 2017
9,642
#24
I am sadly not even surprised.
To be fair....who knew about this before hand? I had no idea
Republican lawmakers did:
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...te-girls-boys-13-years-old-girl-a7762776.html

Cassandra Levesque, 17, campaigned in her native New Hampshire to raise the minimum age for marriage to 18 — from 13 for girls and 14 for boys, with parental consent and a judge's permission.

But a bill to set the higher age in law was rejected in the state's legislature.
It comes as a woman in Florida claimed she was forced to marry her rapist aged just 11, and bore nine children before the union eventually collapsed.

Earlier this month, New Jersey governor Chris Christie vetoed a law that would have outlawed child marriage without exception.
"An exclusion without exceptions would violate the cultures and traditions of some communities in New Jersey based on religious traditions," Mr Christie said in a statement.
https://www.tennessean.com/story/ne...arriage-bill-gay-marriage-argument/404559002/
House Republicans effectively killed a bill Wednesday that would prohibit child marriages in Tennessee, citing an obscure legal theory that passing the bill could deter a conservative lawyer's case against gay marriage.
https://www.independent.co.uk/news/...e-group-opposition-lawmakers-us-a8240121.html
Politicians in Kentucky are stepping up their fight to end child marriage in the state after a planned vote on the matter was postponed because of opposition from a conservative group.
Under current law, 16 and 17-year-olds can marry with their parents’ permission. Any age under 16 can also get wed, as long as they are pregnant and marrying the father of their child.
https://www.riverfronttimes.com/newsblog/2018/02/20/child-marriage-is-a-ok-say-50-missouri-lawmakers
Last night, members of the Missouri House faced a vote on a bill that would bar marriage for state residents fourteen or younger. Fifty of them voted no.
Granted, the bill passed, 95-50, but the surge of opposition is noteworthy, since the bill is geared to reform a state law that's been criticized for making Missouri a haven for sex trafficking.
It's funny (and by funny I mean horrifying and depressing and not at all surprising) how Republicans would staunchly oppose young girls and women to make decisions about their own bodies, such as getting an abortion, but are totally fine with them getting married. It's all about controlling women's lives.
 
Oct 31, 2017
2,968
#25
The only positive is that they and their children and future children will absorb the culture of the USA and will start to shy away from this shit.
 
Nov 2, 2017
2,664
#26
As terrible as it is, it is probably better for these people to be in the USA than wherever they ceremony took place?
Nah...fuck that. You're going to start with this "shithole country" garbage? GTFO. They are better off not being ripped from their countries by American pedophiles. I really want to know why you think a country that allows this shit is a good place for these children to live?
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,760
#32
Nah...fuck that. You're going to start with this "shithole country" garbage? GTFO. They are better off not being ripped from their countries by American pedophiles. I really want to know why you think a country that allows this shit is a good place for these children to live?
Their home countries also allow it, no?
 
Oct 27, 2017
14,820
#34
As an immigration lawyer, I'm not going to pass judgment on such an "issue" until I've done more research. There is a BIG difference between having say a I-129(f) Fiance Petition approved and actually being able to succesfully adjust status via an I-485. I suspect this article is making a big deal out of nothing as I find it hard to believe a USCIS officer is marriage visas of children when its obvious the child has been coerced.
 
OP
OP
Fiction

Fiction

Fanthropologist
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
1,747
#35
As an immigration lawyer, I'm not going to pass judgment on such an "issue" until I've done more research. There is a BIG difference between having say a I-129(f) Fiance Petition approved and actually being able to succesfully adjust status via an I-485. I suspect this article is making a big deal out of nothing as I find it hard to believe a USCIS officer is marriage visas of children when its obvious the child has been coerced.
Coerced? Their kids man, the fact they are getting married at all is scary.
 
Oct 27, 2017
14,820
#36
Coerced? Their kids man, the fact they are getting married at all is scary.
Different countries have different cultures and International Law can only function on "comity." We in the U.S. may find the concept of arranged marriages, even amongst adults, distasteful. But, other countries may find marriage between homosexuals to be distasteful. The general policy of comity in international law is to accept legal marriages from foreign countries within reason. Here, in the U.S., marriage is a state level issue and the majority of states will adhere to the doctrine of comity so long as the marriage was valid and either isn't a) completely prohibited by statute regardless of where it took place (a rarity) and b) isn't "repugnant to public policy." This includes marriages that may actually be illegal to be performed in the state.

But, like I said, I'd have to research this particular issue more as the article is very confusing and seems to think a granted petition is some grant of legal status in the U.S.
 
OP
OP
Fiction

Fiction

Fanthropologist
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
1,747
#40
Different countries have different cultures and International Law can only function on "comity." We in the U.S. may find the concept of arranged marriages, even amongst adults, distasteful. But, other countries may find marriage between homosexuals to be distasteful. The general policy of comity in international law is to accept legal marriages from foreign countries within reason. Here, in the U.S., marriage is a state level issue and the majority of states will adhere to the doctrine of comity so long as the marriage was valid and either isn't a) completely prohibited by statute regardless of where it took place (a rarity) and b) isn't "repugnant to public policy." This includes marriages that may actually be illegal to be performed in the state.

But, like I said, I'd have to research this particular issue more as the article is very confusing and seems to think a granted petition is some grant of legal status in the U.S.
I know you are likely looking at it from a law standpoint, but comparing child marriage to gay marriage really doesn't sit right with me.
 
Oct 27, 2017
14,820
#41
I had some time to really read the article and its amazing how much it gets wrong about the Immigration process, nearly none of it it is correct.

AP said:
There is a two-step process for obtaining U.S. immigration visas and green cards. Petitions are first considered by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, or USCIS. If granted, they must be approved by the State Department. Overall, there were 3.5 million petitions received from budget years 2007 through 2017.
All of that is wrong except for the petition part being handled by USCIS.

You can't just bring someone over into the U.S. because you got married, the fact that their "petition" was approved is meaningless. You'll note the article doesn't mention what this petition is or what it means.

AP said:
Amin, now 29, said she was betrothed when she was just 8 and he was 21. The petition she submitted after her marriage was approved by immigration officials, but he never came to the country, in part because she ran away from home. She said the ordeal cost her a childhood. She was in and out of foster care and group homes, and it took a while to get her life on track.
Again, what petition? What are they talking about?

I believe I know what they are referring to and can explain it to everyone here. When you get married to a non-citizen and are seeking to allow them to gain lawful status through your citizenship you first have to file an I-130 Petition for Family Relative and/or Spouse. I-130's are pretty much always approved so long as you can show documents that you've legally married someone. An approved I-130 DOES NOT grant anyone any legal status, you cannot come into the U.S. with an approved I-130. All the document is saying is that you are married to a U.S. citizen. The next step is to then submit a DS-260 with the State Department and then wait a long time, likely a year, for it to be processed. You'll need to provide a bunch of supporting documents (birth certificates, marriage certificates, prison records, military records, letters of support, etc.). Then once all of that has been reviewed you'll be scheduled an interview at the U.S. Consulate in the foreign spouse's home country where they'll both attend and be interviewed by a Consular Officer to determine if the marriage is legitimate.

And, only after that long process will the foreign spouse be issued a Green Card and allowed to travel to the U.S. That process is different, however, if the foreign spouse you married already resides in the U.S. with some type of lawful status.

So, the fact that I-130 Petitions for child marriages are approved is not a real issue, whether those same marriages successfully made it through the DS-260 process and their spouses issued Green Cards is a WHOLE seperate issue that I doubt is happening in any large numbers.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,120
#44
Its religion. It's always religion.
If I was in control, I'd outlaw this shit pronto, then hunt down all the fucks hat submitted this shit for approval. I'm all for customs, traditions and religion, but when it comes to this, to those that hide behind customs/traditions and religions to commit bullshit sick shit, FUCK YOUR CUSTOMS, TRADITIONS AND RELIGIONS! Oh, what a glorious world it would be if I had that power, though! So far, I have yet to wake up with the Infinity Gauntlet or godlike abilities, though I keep hopin, maybe, one day...
 
Oct 28, 2017
6,871
#45
and then whether the marriage would be legal in the state where the petitioner lives.
We had a discussion about this a few months ago but it bears repeating this weird double standard about underage marriage being legal while underage sex is illegal in the same state needs to be sorted out.