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US PoliERA 2018 |OT13| Very Legal & Very Cool (and very redacted)

Box of Kittens

Resettlement Advisor
Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,603
0
I know people like to pretend Sanders is only popular because he was the only alternative to Clinton, but there's a reason Sanders didn't go the way of O'Malley (or basically any other primary-losing candidate in general) and nobody expected Sanders to blow up like he did when he announced his run (not even him). What he did was quite impressive for what it was, whether you like him or not.

But now more than ever, I don't think any president can do much without major majorities in both chambers. The incentives for compromise are just not there anymore -- republicans don't care if they lose seats because they're confident they can smear dems enough to win them again later.
Since it came up earlier, and of course speaking only for myself, it's not that I think Sanders is only popular because he was the only alternative to Clinton, rather that because he was able to establish a solid base of support, he eventually emerged as the only real alternative to Clinton. This means that there was a part of his coalition that voted for him more based on opposition to Clinton than on support for him, which you can see for example in exit polls where he often fared well among conservative Democrats (the most extreme case being that a large portion of WV Sanders primary voters said they'd vote for Trump in the general even if Sanders won the nomination). Likewise in Democratic primaries in 2017-2018 where there was a clear left-right (left-center if you prefer) divide, the precinct level results often looked very different from the Sanders-Clinton results. That's not to say his message didn't resonate with a lot of people (again, the only reason he could even emerge as Not-Clinton was to first build a strong base of support), just that he probably can't count on starting with all or almost all his 2016 voters as his base support.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,457
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I'm not impressed by Brown's answers to these questions. He seems like he's not exactly sure what he's doing. He's a bit old, gruff, & stiff too.

I don't think he has it. (Also, he automatically would lose a Senate seat if he won).

Only candidates I'm impressed by so far are Beto & Bullock. Kamala / Kirsten / Booker may be okay but I'd need more time to evaluate them. Bernie, Warren, & Biden seem like flops to me.
 
He says trump hasn’t delivered on the wall, defunding planned parenthood and getting rid of the ACA. He loves what trump is selling, he just thinks he’s too stupid to get it done. This is hardly shocking.
I think that’s why I was taken aback. I didn’t think Tucker would confess that Trump isn’t capable of giving him the monstrous future he wants. I just assumed most on Fox had unwavering confidence in their #1 fan.
 
Dec 11, 2017
332
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Maybe it's just me but I like that he was just trying to wing his responses. That's how you get honest and sincere responses. Not responses prepared and carefully examined by a team of people.
I'm not a politician obviously - but a lot of that is experience not of policy, but of specific questions. If I'm on a media tour and I hear a new question, I answer it to the best of my ability - but I may be sort of diagraming information as I speak and talking around tricky aspects simply because I haven't had to elucidate them, rather than from not knowing the answer. By the end of a tour, I'll have the answer to that question down pat, and will start repeating it more succinctly and with better focus. Beto has moved into the national spotlight and so he's answering completely new questions about shit like foreign policy that a TX local rep would never have had to . So he's probably going through something similar.
I think both of these responses are fair, but it's hard because I'm a health care professional and Dems campaigned on healthcare. And many of these questions he felt like he was winging it on were related directly toward people's healthcare. It's obvious that everyone's healthcare experience is unique, but I just hope that he brushes up on how to answer these questions a little more directly for my tastes.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,019
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Bring back earmarks!
Unironically this. I think hyper-partisanship is a direct result of losing this. You need ways to peel off support from the other side to combat hyper-partisanship. Morally, I'd love it if all 100 senators and 435 Reps voted progressively, but realistically why would any Republican vote across the aisle for what I want if they don't want it? Gotta have some pork to bribe them, essentially.

Well sure, people don't like the truth when it makes them look bad :P

In general, I think "authenticity" in politics is usually more about how they talk about and express themselves + how consistent they are in their views (and if they change their views, how they walk that evolution) --- bonus points in authenticity for consistency in uncommon views: "he says it like it is" vs talking like a politician. And by talking like a politician, I mean being politically correct, but not just "not saying bigoted things" -- in a broader sense that can also include merely sticking with political orthodoxies (having "realistic" policy proposals and sounding like everything you say has been focus tested).

(Beto also had this sort of authenticity in his senate race)
I mostly agree with you, but the electorate does love its bullshit sometimes though. Remember Clinton's "we're going to put a lot of people out of work" comment? That was accurate, good policy, not politically correct (it wasn't focus-testy at all), and it went over like a lead balloon.

Again, in this discussion, I mostly agree with you, but I think there are exceptions where the electorate doesn't actually want honesty at all.
 

Stinkles

343 Industries
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
7,552
0

I am torn on this one.

Firstly, proper wages would end the conversation but absent that:


1. It's pretty normal - most business lounges I've been in don't have tip jars.
2. International guests find it confusing, uncomfortable and in some cases insulting.
3. No other employees have a tip jar.
4. Nobody is in the business lounge for fun.

Just pay them what you pay desk staff.
 
Nov 7, 2017
9,430
0
I am torn on this one.

Firstly, proper wages would end the conversation but absent that:


1. It's pretty normal - most business lounges I've been in don't have tip jars.
2. International guests find it confusing, uncomfortable and in some cases insulting.
3. No other employees have a tip jar.
4. Nobody is in the business lounge for fun.

Just pay them what you pay desk staff.
Sounds like communism to me
 
Oct 25, 2017
6,972
0
35
I am torn on this one.

Firstly, proper wages would end the conversation but absent that:


1. It's pretty normal - most business lounges I've been in don't have tip jars.
2. International guests find it confusing, uncomfortable and in some cases insulting.
3. No other employees have a tip jar.
4. Nobody is in the business lounge for fun.

Just pay them what you pay desk staff.
Yeah the problem is the employees are taking home less money. If you want to remove the jar, figure out the loss they are taking and compensate or raise prices.
 
Oct 31, 2017
412
0
Since it came up earlier, and of course speaking only for myself, it's not that I think Sanders is only popular because he was the only alternative to Clinton, rather that because he was able to establish a solid base of support, he eventually emerged as the only real alternative to Clinton. This means that there was a part of his coalition that voted for him more based on opposition to Clinton than on support for him, which you can see for example in exit polls where he often fared well among conservative Democrats (the most extreme case being that a large portion of WV Sanders primary voters said they'd vote for Trump in the general even if Sanders won the nomination). Likewise in Democratic primaries in 2017-2018 where there was a clear left-right (left-center if you prefer) divide, the precinct level results often looked very different from the Sanders-Clinton results. That's not to say his message didn't resonate with a lot of people (again, the only reason he could even emerge as Not-Clinton was to first build a strong base of support), just that he probably can't count on starting with all or almost all his 2016 voters as his base support.

Bingo - yes, Sanders had a large core of actual support, obviously.

But, at the same time, in many states, he won voters who wanted the next Democratic nominee to be more conservative than Obama.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,452
0
Canada
Remember Scott Pruitt?


Laura Litvan @LauraLitvan

NEW: A GOP donor helped pay former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's legal bills, a new financial disclosure shows | per @jendlouhyhc & @bill_allison https://www.bgov.com/core/news/#!/articles/PJC4X86JIJUU

Brady Dennis @brady_dennis

Wisconsin billionaire business woman Diane Hendricks gave $50,000 toward former EPA head Scott Pruitt's legal defense fund. Disclosure report says "EPA ethics officials did not know of this contribution -- believed to be in cash -- until they received the termination report."

Pepperidge Farm Remembers.
 
Oct 25, 2017
16,582
0
Bingo - yes, Sanders had a large core of actual support, obviously.

But, at the same time, in many states, he won voters who wanted the next Democratic nominee to be more conservative than Obama.
I'm gonna be posting this article more times than a switch port gets begged for ain't I. https://www.voterstudygroup.org/publications/2016-elections/political-divisions-in-2016-and-beyond

The areas where Bernie's support deviates significantly from Clinton/Obama are important.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,381
0
Survivor 18 (and the follow ups 20 and 34) should be required political viewing for the "charismatic bullshitter" vs "nerd with brain" dynamic.

Basically, it was so hard to fire someone that way-higher-than-normal unemployment was a result because businesses were taking on so much implied risk each time they'd bring someone on. France had the "security" part of "flexicurity" in place w/ social safety nets, but the labor laws were done in such a way where it was great if you could get a job.... but actually getting one was extraordinarily difficult.
Okay, that makes sense. Thank you. I need to do more reading about these reforms, basically.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,977
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I mostly agree with you, but the electorate does love its bullshit sometimes though. Remember Clinton's "we're going to put a lot of people out of work" comment? That was accurate, good policy, not politically correct (it wasn't focus-testy at all), and it went over like a lead balloon.

Again, in this discussion, I mostly agree with you, but I think there are exceptions where the electorate doesn't actually want honesty at all.
Yeah like the deplorables comment, I'd categorize that as "hard truth" and you're right -- the electorate doesn't like hard truths.
 

MarioW

PikPok
Verified
Nov 5, 2017
223
0
New Zealand
www.pikpok.com
I mean yeah but also. Why don't you get them to pay fair wages without relying on citizens to fund private salaries first
Exactly my first thought. Though tipping (and employer abuse of it) is so entrenched in the US culture and economy there is probably no easy or fast fix, especially given the resistance to minimum wage changes.


Probably one of those ironic assholes who walk around in punisher shirts.
As he is a law enforcement official, why stop at the tshirt, when you could have it on the hood of your patrol vehicle.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,452
0
Canada
Michael Del Moro @MikeDelMoro

Rep. Joaquin Castro says on MSNBC Roger Stone "certainly lied" to the House Intel Committee, says everyone in the room "had the sense" that Stone perjured himself


Edit:
Kyle Griffin @kylegriffin1

Joaquin Castro on @MSNBC: "Roger Stone, I'm almost certain, will be prosecuted for lying to the House Intelligence Committee."

Castro said Stone told Schiff and Swalwell at one point that he had no advanced knowledge of the 2016 emails dumps then, hours later, admitted he did.
 
Last edited:
Oct 26, 2017
3,452
0
Canada

Dan McCready for NC @McCreadyForNC

I didn’t serve overseas in the Marines to come home to NC and watch a criminal, bankrolled by my opponent, take away people’s very right to vote. Today I withdraw my concession and call on Mark Harris to end his silence and tell us exactly what he knew, and when.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,170
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Oct 25, 2017
2,677
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NC gonna get juicy. If blatent voter fraud occurred, they need to blast that shit all over TV, cause you know, ACTUAL VOTER FRAUD is the fucking GOP.
Just to be clear its ELECTION fraud, not voter fraud. No voter did anything wrong here. It seems nitpicky but I think its important to distinguish the two if we (us, the media, etc.) are going to be talking about this issue for a while.
 
Oct 25, 2017
9,727
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Just to be clear its ELECTION fraud, not voter fraud. No voter did anything wrong here. It seems nitpicky but I think its important to distinguish the two if we (us, the media, etc.) are going to be talking about this issue for a while.
I'll settle for REPUBLICANS CHEATED at the top of every article if they don't want to distinguish between the types of fraud.

But that's just me.