VeganERA |OT| Eat your veggies

PinkSpider

Member
Oct 27, 2017
261
Ok I finally got to Iceland and bought one of everything lol. So far I've had the paella which was indeed very tasty, the green veggie balls (also good, kinda reminded me of christmas actually), tofu burger (pretty awesome, nice smoked flavour) and the chorizo slices and no chick strips. Fried the burger, chorizo and strips and they were great. I also grabbed one of the free from margherita pizzas from Tesco and then thres some fried chorizo and strips on that in the last few mins of cooking for a very tasty pizza.

Iceland knocking it out of the park with the vegan options! They had an entire freezer cabinet dedicated to the No Bull range, plus another cabinet or two full of the usual veggie options
I might have to pick up some of those strips today then, had the chorizo last night on pizza and whilst it wasn't the best chorizo I've had it was tasty enough. I've heard really good things about the strips though (and hoping my Tesco has that, or the Oumph pizza in today. Went last night and left disappointed, although did pick up a Wicked pizza).

And yeah who'd of thought Iceland would end up doing one of the tastiest Vegan ranges.
 

PinkSpider

Member
Oct 27, 2017
261
UK people; Tesco have two new pizzas out. One is gluten free (but okay still apparently) and Oumph have a cheeseless (I think) one which looks pretty lovely and is only £1.75! (On offer I think).
 
OP
OP
dude

dude

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,197
Tel Aviv

FliXFantatier

Master of the Reality Stone
Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
3,747
Los Angeles
I just had my first impossible burger.
In a not too distant future the excuse 'I just like the tase of meat' is not going to hold water...
 

Hypron

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,582
NZ
Oh nice a new Indian shop opened close to where I live. They sell Urad beans for NZ$2/kg. I don't think it's possible to beat $2 for 250g of protein haha

For comparison after my previous store of choice closed I had to buy beans online for $7/kg. I eat a lot of beans so literally cutting my bean budget by a factor of 3 is huge.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,580
Well, I started. I made this for dinner tonight.

https://www.connoisseurusveg.com/vegan-chicken-parmesan/

I used Daiya cheese, made the tomato sauce myself, and did the recipe in the article with the exception that I used bread crumbs instead of the cornmeal batter. Honestly, it's not bad at all. Doesn't taste like chicken parmesan, but it is good. When I make this again, I'll probably cut down on the cornmeal and add more almond milk because they are dry.
 

sgtnosboss

Member
Nov 9, 2017
2,805
IL
Well, I started. I made this for dinner tonight.

https://www.connoisseurusveg.com/vegan-chicken-parmesan/

I used Daiya cheese, made the tomato sauce myself, and did the recipe in the article with the exception that I used bread crumbs instead of the cornmeal batter. Honestly, it's not bad at all. Doesn't taste like chicken parmesan, but it is good. When I make this again, I'll probably cut down on the cornmeal and add more almond milk because they are dry.
Follow your Heart is pretty good, also Aldi's brand is my new favorite for cheese that melts

looks delicous!
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,580
(Sorry for maybe posting too much, but this is all new to me)

First time cooking with tofu tonight. Last night before bed I wrapped it in paper towels and pressed it with cans in the fridge and left it for what was maybe 18 hours before I put it in a marinade: https://www.thekitchn.com/easy-garlic-herb-marinade-257173

Put some corn starch on it, fried it, and it's not that great and I don't know exactly why.

The outside was perfectly crispy as I intended, but the innards was spongey and strange in texture. The marinade wasn't very good, too focused on lemon and the dijon overpowered a lot of it (also not garlic enough considering it's in the title of the marinade), but I'm not sure if I made things worse by how long I marinaded it. It ultimately sat in the marinade after the pressing for about 4 hours and considering I can really taste it, I assume I did a good job of pressing the tofu.

I guess, did I marinate it for too long or just pick a bad marinade? Is the texture of the inside of tofu always going to be like that, where it resembles scrambled eggs with the outside crisped very well?

For reference, it was extra firm tofu I started with, but I don't recall the brand.
 

sgtnosboss

Member
Nov 9, 2017
2,805
IL
Try freezing it. Also this YouTubers sounds good, I've never personally tried it though. I press mine about a day too. Deep frying it tastes better in my opinion, sometimes I bake it, sometimes I puff it (quick fry).

https://youtu.be/bhJHnXgS6TU
 

PinkSpider

Member
Oct 27, 2017
261
Everyone in the UK been to Asda? £2.30 for a 10" decent Vegan pizza; when I first went Vegan I in no way imagined I'd be able to get decent pizza dirt cheap from one of the biggest supermarkets.

 

Wren Wolfe

Member
Nov 10, 2017
253
(Sorry for maybe posting too much, but this is all new to me)

First time cooking with tofu tonight. Last night before bed I wrapped it in paper towels and pressed it with cans in the fridge and left it for what was maybe 18 hours before I put it in a marinade: https://www.thekitchn.com/easy-garlic-herb-marinade-257173

Put some corn starch on it, fried it, and it's not that great and I don't know exactly why.

The outside was perfectly crispy as I intended, but the innards was spongey and strange in texture. The marinade wasn't very good, too focused on lemon and the dijon overpowered a lot of it (also not garlic enough considering it's in the title of the marinade), but I'm not sure if I made things worse by how long I marinaded it. It ultimately sat in the marinade after the pressing for about 4 hours and considering I can really taste it, I assume I did a good job of pressing the tofu.

I guess, did I marinate it for too long or just pick a bad marinade? Is the texture of the inside of tofu always going to be like that, where it resembles scrambled eggs with the outside crisped very well?

For reference, it was extra firm tofu I started with, but I don't recall the brand.
Hey, man. Don't get discouraged after cooking tofu for the first time. The first time my fiance and I cooked with it, it was super spongey and unpleasant, and the next time it was too crispy/crunchy from overdoing it. Tofu, unless you dice it very small and fry it, will always be a little spongey, but you can cook it in different ways to change up the texture.

I recently bought an actual spring tofu press, but before I had that, I would wrap it in paper towels and press it with heavy books, and I would actually just leave it on the kitchen counter--even for 12+ hours. I don't know if it is better to leave it out or refrigerate it, but I feel like it works well.

Personally, my favorite way to cook tofu is to cut it in strips and pan fry it after rolling it in breadcrumbs. I hope you have better luck with tofu!!
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,580
Hey, man. Don't get discouraged after cooking tofu for the first time. The first time my fiance and I cooked with it, it was super spongey and unpleasant, and the next time it was too crispy/crunchy from overdoing it. Tofu, unless you dice it very small and fry it, will always be a little spongey, but you can cook it in different ways to change up the texture.

I recently bought an actual spring tofu press, but before I had that, I would wrap it in paper towels and press it with heavy books, and I would actually just leave it on the kitchen counter--even for 12+ hours. I don't know if it is better to leave it out or refrigerate it, but I feel like it works well.

Personally, my favorite way to cook tofu is to cut it in strips and pan fry it after rolling it in breadcrumbs. I hope you have better luck with tofu!!
Thanks for the words of encouragement!

The good news is that the flavors mellowed out the second night for leftovers, so that was a major plus. However, the tofu texture got more sponge-like.

I think I'm going to visit some vegan restaurants near me to try some professionally cooked vegan food made with tofu and stuff like that to get an idea of how it should be because when I made it, that was my first time eating tofu and I had no benchmark to compare it to like I would making other things.

I think next time I'll cube it since I did slices and pan fried them (slices were about a finger thick, for perspective).

Week one went well. Only 1 meal was a cheat and that's because it was dinner someone cooked for me. I had a craving for hamburgers so I bought some vegan frozen patties that were not very good and very dry, and I've been struggling a little on breakfasts/lunches, but dinners are great.

Groceries are more expensive, but I expected that going in on this. And, apparently a Walmart near me has a good selection of vegan products so I might drive the 20 minutes and check out that type of stuff.
 

PinkSpider

Member
Oct 27, 2017
261
Re tofu are we all aware Chinese supermarkets largely sell 'puffed' or fried tofu which is pretty much the same as all Chinese/Thai/Japanese restaurants sell. It just needs heating up and flavouring, already has a 'skin' and in the UK costs around £2.50. (Also great just heated up and dipped in soy/sauces).
 

sgtnosboss

Member
Nov 9, 2017
2,805
IL
Thanks for the words of encouragement!

The good news is that the flavors mellowed out the second night for leftovers, so that was a major plus. However, the tofu texture got more sponge-like.

I think I'm going to visit some vegan restaurants near me to try some professionally cooked vegan food made with tofu and stuff like that to get an idea of how it should be because when I made it, that was my first time eating tofu and I had no benchmark to compare it to like I would making other things.

I think next time I'll cube it since I did slices and pan fried them (slices were about a finger thick, for perspective).

Week one went well. Only 1 meal was a cheat and that's because it was dinner someone cooked for me. I had a craving for hamburgers so I bought some vegan frozen patties that were not very good and very dry, and I've been struggling a little on breakfasts/lunches, but dinners are great.

Groceries are more expensive, but I expected that going in on this. And, apparently a Walmart near me has a good selection of vegan products so I might drive the 20 minutes and check out that type of stuff.
What brand did you try? There are definitely some that are better than others for patties. I definitely suggest what you did when craving, thats what I did. We would either try to veganize a meal ourselves or purchase something to do so. A lot of the pre made meats can make it more expensive, but if you enjoy cooking it can be a lot cheaper to make things yourself or start moving away from prepackaged ones. TVP(textured vegetable protein) ground or chunks were great for me, super cheap and can bulk order online, also dried so it won't go bad. I am not super helpful on breakfast because I don't normally eat a lot in the morning, but on weekends if we do, we make scrambles with tofu or follow your heart egg and a ton of veggies. We also make other scrambles. Both are great for stuffing in a burrito and having breakfasts ready for a few days or freezing. The other day we tried to mimic Casey's breakfast pizza and it turned out amazing.
 

FliXFantatier

Master of the Reality Stone
Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
3,747
Los Angeles
Urgh

Why do restaurants still (?) insist on using chicken stock. Why not just use vegetable stock in everything and open up the menu for non carnivores...
 

sgtnosboss

Member
Nov 9, 2017
2,805
IL
Urgh

Why do restaurants still (?) insist on using chicken stock. Why not just use vegetable stock in everything and open up the menu for non carnivores...
Why not use "no chicken" or "no beef" stock if you want it those flavors.. I agree with you. Sometimes its so easy for them to make slight changes and accommodate such a wider group of people
 

MrT

Member
Oct 27, 2017
209
Re: meaty cravings, gonna copy a post I made in the climate change thread:

Look into seitan, it's really versatile and people are doing incredible things with it now. I've been making this basic recipe every week to do meal prep with - https://avocadosandales.com/2017/12/17/chickwheat-shreds/. It's incredibly versatile, can shred it and chuck chunks of it in a curry or stew, or thinly slice it and use it like sandwich meat, or even fry it up like bacon. Once you have the basic recipe down, you can start to play with the spices to change the flavour. Add poultry seasoning to make it more "chickeny" or pork seasoning to get a pork vibe etc. On it's own it probably won't fool anyone as the spices give a sort of hint of the meat you're aiming to replicate rather than being exactly like it, but in terms of texture it's pretty great. I've made curries where people have honestly though they were eating chicken.
If you buy a big bag of vital wheat gluten it will last you ages and you can make meat replacements that are way cheaper than the store bought ones. This week's lunch meal prep for me is salt and chilli seitan (using shreds from the above recipe), absolutely delicious and once it's fried up it has all the meaty texture you need!
 

Ashby

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,230
Can someone please link me to the thread here re: the study about how veganism is the best way to reduce ones impact on the environmental
 

mintzilla

Member
Nov 6, 2017
538
Canada
Wut? Lentils don't take two hours to cook. More like two minutes. Though it does depend on what kind you have. Red ones are ready super fast, green ones take a bit longer (maybe 15 minutes). Nowhere near two hours though.


Chickpeas you do have to cook for an hour to hour and a half. And you don't soak lentils for two days >_>; More like 2 hours and even that is excessive. Then wash them and throw them to soups or sauces when closer to the end of the process.


Peas and beans that take a longer time are best prepared in big batches since it does take a lot of energy and time. Just store any extra you won't eat in a few days in the freezer.
Sir you need to explain yourself because I tried it again and it was still hard as a rock. It’s a bag of mixed stuff that has green split peas barley yellow lentils and green lentils I think red ones too.
The barley is the only part that is soft. The rest will shatter your teeth.
 

Famassu

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,336
Sir you need to explain yourself because I tried it again and it was still hard as a rock. It’s a bag of mixed stuff that has green split peas barley yellow lentils and green lentils I think red ones too.
The barley is the only part that is soft. The rest will shatter your teeth.
I dunno what to say. I don't extensively soak lentils. I don't soak them for 12 hours before cooking them like I do with peas and beans of any kind. I start soaking them at the start of my food preparation process and thus they soak maybe 30 minutes if that before I wash them and add them to the dish I'm making at the appropriate time (red lentils quite late into the cooking, green ones a bit earlier).

I mean, if you don't trust my word, here's the instructions from the package of red lentils I use.



It's in Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian but notice the washing imagery in step 1 at the bottom (they don't even tell you to soak the red ones, just wash them) and then the "10 min" text on the pot-icon in step 2. Green lentils they recommend to soak for an hour or so to shorten the time you need to cook them but even without soaking it takes only 20 minutes according to them. With soaking it's 10-15.
 

Teacher

Member
Oct 27, 2017
129
Sir you need to explain yourself because I tried it again and it was still hard as a rock. It’s a bag of mixed stuff that has green split peas barley yellow lentils and green lentils I think red ones too.
The barley is the only part that is soft. The rest will shatter your teeth.
Is your lentil mix very old? That can affect cooking time. There could also be some kind of chemical reaction responsible. I know that beans tend to take longer to cook if you salt the water too much.
 

Famassu

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,336
What kind of space lentils are you cooking that need a soaking and a 1 hour cooking on top of that?
 

nelsonroyale

Member
Oct 28, 2017
2,644
Famassu: There are all sorts of lentil types in India, quite a few take a while to cook: https://www.thespruceeats.com/a-photo-gallery-of-indian-daals-and-beans-4121903

I see some people going for the cheapest vegan options in Tescos, Asdas, Iceland etc. I'm guessing a lot of the sourcing for this stuff ain't that good. I understand people eat vegan for all sorts of reasons, but sometimes I find peope seem to think that going vegan by itself makes the necessary difference in terms ethics / sustainability. Obviously quite a lot of non-meat products have pretty unsustainable sourcing. I am sure most people here know this, but there is obviously two sides to the coin: what the product is and how it is sourced / produced.
 

Famassu

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,336
Famassu: There are all sorts of lentil types in India, quite a few take a while to cook: https://www.thespruceeats.com/a-photo-gallery-of-indian-daals-and-beans-4121903

I see some people going for the cheapest vegan options in Tescos, Asdas, Iceland etc. I'm guessing a lot of the sourcing for this stuff ain't that good. I understand people eat vegan for all sorts of reasons, but sometimes I find peope seem to think that going vegan by itself makes the necessary difference in terms ethics / sustainability. Obviously quite a lot of non-meat products have pretty unsustainable sourcing. I am sure most people here know this, but there is obviously two sides to the coin: what the product is and how it is sourced / produced.
Sure, not every plant based food is super efficient to produce and there are some problematic stuff like palm oil and rice (both of which I try to avoid/use less of) but ultimately meat and dairy are generally 3-10x worse when it comes to the amount of water spent, land area needed and energy wasted on handling and storing than even the worst plant based alternatives (not to even mention how much more easily meat and most dairy products spoil in comparison to a lot of important plant based foods, so a lot of it goes to waste after an already wasteful production), so I generally don't think there's a need to be as manical about the sustainability of producing plant based foods.

I try to buy locally sourced food when it's best (i.e. buying local tomatoes in the winter when they are produced in energy wasting greenhouses isn't necessarily the best option ecologically) and generally try to choose the least ecologically damaging options otherwise, but ultimately I don't obsess about the absolute lowest impact alternatives.
 

nelsonroyale

Member
Oct 28, 2017
2,644
Sure, not every plant based food is super efficient to produce and there are some problematic stuff like palm oil and rice (both of which I try to avoid/use less of) but ultimately meat and dairy are generally 3-10x worse when it comes to the amount of water spent, land area needed and energy wasted on handling and storing than even the worst plant based alternatives (not to even mention how much more easily meat and most dairy products spoil in comparison to a lot of important plant based foods, so a lot of it goes to waste after an already wasteful production), so I generally don't think there's a need to be as manical about the sustainability of producing plant based foods.

I try to buy locally sourced food when it's best (i.e. buying local tomatoes in the winter when they are produced in energy wasting greenhouses isn't necessarily the best option ecologically) and generally try to choose the least ecologically damaging options otherwise, but ultimately I don't obsess about the absolute lowest impact alternatives.
it is step by step process i suppose for the general public. I was brought up on an organic farm and also am an ecologist, so I suppose I am not much of a fan of plant based monocultures either. It is not really being maniacal. Just aware and conscious. Personally, I don't think it is primarily a matter of consumer choice, because I think relying on individual consumers to make better decisions is a slow moving process. Major agricultural reform is needed effectively. If the consumer has to shoulder higher prices for certain products, then that may be necessary given a lot of stuff is artificially deflated in price because of exploitation of labour, lack of environmental accounability, lack of carbon accounting, etc.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,580
Starting to get into a groove with this. A couple of problems I knew I was going to have I am having, one I should have anticipated but didn't, and one that is becoming a bit of a bummer in its severity.

Tofu I got now. The first time turned out OK like I said, but was just a bit of a mess because the marinade wasn't good. Made some more (I don't remember the first brand I got, but this brand is called Nasoya and was fine). I ignored recipes and did a marinade that I would use on regular meat, except I added a little more acidic flavoring. I didn't freeze (do I do that after pressing it and do I freeze it back into a solid or just to make it very cold?) but I did the press like I did last time except in the morning after the overnight press I used another towel to get more liquid out. Turned out much better.

The thing I didn't appreciate is that I need to plan ahead better. Some of the dishes I'm making are more time and labor attentive than the meat counterparts I would make, so I just need to be more mindful of that. And, if I am hungry and don't have dinner ready, I can't just stop off at a fast food place and grab something quick and cheap. So, something I've done as well is looked in the freezer aisle to see what's there, and it's not much. There's a rice and vegetable stir fry by Amy's (just bought, haven't tried), various frozen faux chicken/hamburger patties (the hamburger ones are dry, so I just use more mustard and make sure to have tomatoes), faux chicken nuggets (tasted exactly like chicken nuggets to me), and eggplant patties (didn't buy). I looked on Amy's website, and I see some other vegan alternatives, but that's the only one my stores carry.

I forgot to look what brand of frozen hamburger patties I bought the first time, but I am trying Boco now. It's the only other brand they have. I'll let you know my thoughts on that one. But, I did get LightLife "smart" bacon and it was so dry and terrible. Might as well just skip eating bacon.

And, as someone who loves mushrooms, they aren't a meat substitute in the slightest for me and I'm starting to get burned out on them because I was trying to treat them as such, so no mushrooms for the next couple of weeks as I experiment more.

The biggest hurdle is the cheese. I've tried two, the only two that are available in the stores nearest to me that I can conveniently get to (more on this in a second). The first was Daiya, which doesn't melt well and has a bit of an aftertaste. If you use a lot of it, like in a pizza, the aftertaste gets worse. The second one was GoVeggie and was inedible. I should have tasted it before using it because I just scraped it off and threw it in the garbage. The aftertaste was terrible and it melts into something that, well, looks incredibly unappetizing to say the least.

I know someone mentioned Follow Your Heart, but it's not at my stores. I haven't looked yet to see if it's at a Whole Foods that delivers to me, or if I'm just maybe going to try and call some mom and pop smaller places and see if they carry it to try it. But, honestly, with the two alternatives I've tried, I'm either going to have to give up cheese completely, which will be very tough for me, or use the real stuff. I just love cheese, of all types, and these alternatives just aren't near close enough for me sadly. I'll try a homemade vegan cheese recipe for mozzarella before deciding. But, I'm leaning towards weening myself off by making less cheese dishes, but when I do need it, I'll use the real stuff, just in lesser and lesser dishes until I no longer do.

I've had a sweet tooth craving, but haven't tried making anything of my own and haven't looked in the store aisles for anything. If I remember correctly, Oreos are sort of vegan depending on the viewpoint of "bone char" for whitening, and if the specific supplier uses it, which can be inconsistent, right? (But the Newman-O's Oreo equivalent might actually vegan friendly because they have better sourcing? I forgot about the "sugar uses bone char for whitening" thing since last time I tried to really do this.)
 
Last edited:

Lirlond

Member
Oct 26, 2017
57
Honestly you're better off just giving up cheese, it'll be tough going through the withdrawal, but after you won't really want it.
 

bye

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
3,659
Phoenix, AZ
Starting to get into a groove with this. A couple of problems I knew I was going to have I am having, one I should have anticipated but didn't, and one that is becoming a bit of a bummer in its severity.

Tofu I got now. The first time turned out OK like I said, but was just a bit of a mess because the marinade wasn't good. Made some more (I don't remember the first brand I got, but this brand is called Nasoya and was fine). I ignored recipes and did a marinade that I would use on regular meat, except I added a little more acidic flavoring. I didn't freeze (do I do that after pressing it and do I freeze it back into a solid or just to make it very cold?) but I did the press like I did last time except in the morning after the overnight press I used another towel to get more liquid out. Turned out much better.

The thing I didn't appreciate is that I need to plan ahead better. Some of the dishes I'm making are more time and labor attentive than the meat counterparts I would make, so I just need to be more mindful of that. And, if I am hungry and don't have dinner ready, I can't just stop off at a fast food place and grab something quick and cheap. So, something I've done as well is looked in the freezer aisle to see what's there, and it's not much. There's a rice and vegetable stir fry by Amy's (just bought, haven't tried), various frozen faux chicken/hamburger patties (the hamburger ones are dry, so I just use more mustard and make sure to have tomatoes), faux chicken nuggets (tasted exactly like chicken nuggets to me), and eggplant patties (didn't buy). I looked on Amy's website, and I see some other vegan alternatives, but that's the only one my stores carry.

I forgot to look what brand of frozen hamburger patties I bought the first time, but I am trying Boco now. It's the only other brand they have. I'll let you know my thoughts on that one. But, I did get LightLife "smart" bacon and it was so dry and terrible. Might as well just skip eating bacon.

And, as someone who loves mushrooms, they aren't a meat substitute in the slightest for me and I'm starting to get burned out on them because I was trying to treat them as such, so no mushrooms for the next couple of weeks as I experiment more.

The biggest hurdle is the cheese. I've tried two, the only two that are available in the stores nearest to me that I can conveniently get to (more on this in a second). The first was Daiya, which doesn't melt well and has a bit of an aftertaste. If you use a lot of it, like in a pizza, the aftertaste gets worse. The second one was GoVeggie and was inedible. I should have tasted it before using it because I just scraped it off and threw it in the garbage. The aftertaste was terrible and it melts into something that, well, looks incredibly unappetizing to say the least.

I know someone mentioned Follow Your Heart, but it's not at my stores. I haven't looked yet to see if it's at a Whole Foods that delivers to me, or if I'm just maybe going to try and call some mom and pop smaller places and see if they carry it to try it. But, honestly, with the two alternatives I've tried, I'm either going to have to give up cheese completely, which will be very tough for me, or use the real stuff. I just love cheese, of all types, and these alternatives just aren't near close enough for me sadly. I'll try a homemade vegan cheese recipe for mozzarella before deciding. But, I'm leaning towards weening myself off by making less cheese dishes, but when I do need it, I'll use the real stuff, just in lesser and lesser dishes until I no longer do.

I've had a sweet tooth craving, but haven't tried making anything of my own and haven't looked in the store aisles for anything. If I remember correctly, Oreos are sort of vegan depending on the viewpoint of "bone char" for whitening, and if the specific supplier uses it, which can be inconsistent, right? (But the Newman-O's Oreo equivalent might actually vegan friendly because they have better sourcing? I forgot about the "sugar uses bone char for whitening" thing since last time I tried to really do this.)
When it’s comes to vegan cheeses the best are Miyoko, FYH, Chao, Treeline

I know Whole Foods carries most/all of those brands and they individually ship through their websites

Plus if you’re able to wait a couple more years Perfect Day’s lab grown dairy milk will be tranforming the industry and we will be able to get 1:1 cheese replicas that are vegan
 

FalconLunch

Member
Mar 12, 2018
90
Re: meaty cravings, gonna copy a post I made in the climate change thread:



If you buy a big bag of vital wheat gluten it will last you ages and you can make meat replacements that are way cheaper than the store bought ones. This week's lunch meal prep for me is salt and chilli seitan (using shreds from the above recipe), absolutely delicious and once it's fried up it has all the meaty texture you need!
I've wanted to try this recipe for forever but I don't have a blender and my food processor is really tiny and cheap :(

Sometimes I feel super limited by lack of a blender as far as recipes go.
 

Teacher

Member
Oct 27, 2017
129
So I'm going to Amsterdam next weekend. Anyone have any tips for restaurants and cafés or anything else I should hit up? The only thing I have planned so far is going to the Vegan Junk Food Bar.
 

PinkSpider

Member
Oct 27, 2017
261
So I'm going to Amsterdam next weekend. Anyone have any tips for restaurants and cafés or anything else I should hit up? The only thing I have planned so far is going to the Vegan Junk Food Bar.
Maoz falafel bars are on 5/6 (at least) street corners. 100% Veggie and 95% Vegan. All you can eat (decent) falafel in a wrap for around 4 Euros with all you can eat salad and sauces (I loved their hot sauces). Plus 1 Euro for a deep fried/battered aubergine (They also do chips but I just lived on the falafel). Great if you have the munchies.

Their's also a health food shop called the Meatless District I believe.

Annoyingly I've been 3 times now (Their's a ferry trip from my local city) but never been to the Vegan Junk Food Bar.
 

Teacher

Member
Oct 27, 2017
129
Maoz falafel bars are on 5/6 (at least) street corners. 100% Veggie and 95% Vegan. All you can eat (decent) falafel in a wrap for around 4 Euros with all you can eat salad and sauces (I loved their hot sauces). Plus 1 Euro for a deep fried/battered aubergine (They also do chips but I just lived on the falafel). Great if you have the munchies.

Their's also a health food shop called the Meatless District I believe.

Annoyingly I've been 3 times now (Their's a ferry trip from my local city) but never been to the Vegan Junk Food Bar.
Thanks for the tip! Can’t go wrong with falafel.
 

MrT

Member
Oct 27, 2017
209
I've wanted to try this recipe for forever but I don't have a blender and my food processor is really tiny and cheap :(

Sometimes I feel super limited by lack of a blender as far as recipes go.
My food processor is a really cheap Asda one and has held up amazingly well, I was worried about it overheating or burning out the motor but it just keeps going! Depending on just how small yours is you can always split the dough up and do it in batches if you want to give it a shot. I always split mine in two and then steam two loaves.
 

FalconLunch

Member
Mar 12, 2018
90
My food processor is a really cheap Asda one and has held up amazingly well, I was worried about it overheating or burning out the motor but it just keeps going! Depending on just how small yours is you can always split the dough up and do it in batches if you want to give it a shot. I always split mine in two and then steam two loaves.
I'd give it a go if I had a blender of sorts, but I don't think I can get the smooth consistency of that chickpea mixture with any equipment I have.

On the bright side I've got some tofu pressing now to throw in a Korean style gochujang sauce for dinner. So stoked!
 

Boddy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,001
Hi, I'm currently considering to go vegan, but probably not before next year when I have my own apartment.
I'm not against eating meat on principle but I'm against animal cruelty, which is present in even the "better" companies.
The environmental effects are also a big deal for me.

Not sure where to start and I might not go "cold turkey" (a phrase that gets a whole new meaning in this context) right away.
 

FliXFantatier

Master of the Reality Stone
Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
3,747
Los Angeles
Hi, I'm currently considering to go vegan, but probably not before next year when I have my own apartment.
I'm not against eating meat on principle but I'm against animal cruelty, which is present in even the "better" companies.
The environmental effects are also a big deal for me.

Not sure where to start and I might not go "cold turkey" (a phrase that gets a whole new meaning in this context) right away.
Why not ease into it now without chastising yourself and work toward full reduction by the time you move out.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,580
Hi, I'm currently considering to go vegan, but probably not before next year when I have my own apartment.
I'm not against eating meat on principle but I'm against animal cruelty, which is present in even the "better" companies.
The environmental effects are also a big deal for me.

Not sure where to start and I might not go "cold turkey" (a phrase that gets a whole new meaning in this context) right away.
So, I'm a month into my vegan journey, so I'll give some short experience/advice.

Meat/dairy substitute are usually bad. I've had had some good vegan sausages, but they don't taste exactly like meat; bacon substitute are garbage; hamburgers frozen are ok. Every cheese substitute has been terrible to rotten, so skip those. The vegan butter I'm using is actually pretty close, and probably completely fine for most people since most (that is not me) don't know the difference between European butters. If you want to buy frozen foods, it is going to cost you more money than not, and some, like the chick'n or whatever the gardein supplement is called, taste exactly the same. They taste fine, they are just expensive.

Don't think of meals as meat substitute. The chicken substitutes don't tase like chicken (mushrooms are not a substitute for beef not matter how much you read); they taste like something else, not like chicken, but good. Rarely will you get the flavor and texture of meat; I had a beyond burger and it tasted good.

I would recommend not tempting yourself by having meat at home. Go for broke, and adjust your meals. Try not to substitute meat substitute.

It is an adjustment, full stop. I don't miss meat. I do miss diary. You may differ. I failed my first time, but I'm still kicking a month later, and my major change from the first time to now is looking ahead and meal planning. Look at those foods you like. Can you get buy without cheese? Can you get by without milk? Meat? What substitutes can you do that will placate you?

I am very much still struggling with cheese. I want it. But I don't have it in my house, so I don't eat it. I would sort of suggest to go cold turkey, as you say, and don't bring it into the home.

But, people her are much longer vegans than me. In a month, I've been good except for two meals out of my control. I've rarely had my mind wonder, except cheese, and I'm probably an odd ball on that than most.

Everyone here has been super supportive for me and will answer suggestions and give advice.

Edit: You will fail at cooking tofu a couple of times, most likely. Learn to love potatoes and squash, I say, in the season of Fall.
 
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