Virgin Hyperloop Being Built in India - Looks Like a Tube of Death

yumms

Member
Oct 27, 2017
536

This thing must have the best damn safety features, if something wrong how do the emergency personnel even reach the people. Hopefully its beta tested to death before the public release.

the project will link central Pune to Mumbai in under 35 minutes, as opposed to the current 3.5+ hours by road.
There are approximately 75 million passenger journeys between Mumbai and Pune annually – expected to skyrocket to 130 million by 2026. Virgin Hyperloop One’s system can meet this growing demand by supporting as many as 200 million passengers annually, linking central Pune and Mumbai in less than 35 minutes. This ultra-high speed linkage not only opens up new economic and social opportunities, but also offers a sustainable form of mass transportation with zero direct emissions.









 

DrewFu

Member
Apr 19, 2018
5,502
Yeah those hyperloop designs always weird me out. What happens if they break down or something goes wrong - how do they get you out of there?
 

Mivey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,583
OK but how do they get the car to that point? And how do they get you down? And how do they recover you in the middle of nowhere? lol
I think you're overthinking it. Life's dangerous and we all have to die at some point, and with climate change on the horizon, rather sooner than later.
Might as well die trapped inside an overly futuristic gizmo that doesn't serve a function, at least none that's not better met with classical public transport.
 

bulbasort

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
106
With the recent news out of Quebec, I figured I’d instead talk about a transportation concept that doesn’t actually transport anybody at all: the Gadgetbahn.

The word is a portemanteau of the English “Gadget” and the German word “bahn”, which means rail or train. A gadgetbahn is a speculative transportation concept that proposes to solve planning and financial issues via some sort of magical techno-fix, likely some technology that doesn’t even exist yet.
[...]
The beauty of proposing a gadgetbahn is that since it doesn’t exist, proponents can make up all sorts of quasi-magical properties for their technology, which supposedly make it superior. Since there aren’t real-world examples, proponents can use the most optimistic theoretical scenarios they can come up with, and compare them with the actual performance of projects that have been built and which are bound to the constraints of the real world.
 

NyMartin90

Member
Oct 31, 2017
452
Imagine if you get stuck in that tube with no electricity during the summer in India. You'd be cooked alive.
 

Mik2121

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,223
Japan
I think you're overthinking it. Life's dangerous and we all have to die at some point, and with climate change on the horizon, rather sooner than later.
Might as well die trapped inside an overly futuristic gizmo that doesn't serve a function, at least none that's not better met with classical public transport.
Going from 3.5 hours to under 35 minutes, zero direct emissions. But yeah, better met with classical public transport.

If you were born at a different age, you would probably be saying that about horse drawn carriages.
 

CopperPuppy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,935
Yeah those hyperloop designs always weird me out. What happens if they break down or something goes wrong - how do they get you out of there?
They have to do maintenance, right? There are probably hatches or doors every certain number of sections, along with walkways or corridors within where workers can perform upkeep.
 

Teh_Lurv

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,151
OK but how do they get the car to that point? And how do they get you down? And how do they recover you in the middle of nowhere? lol
If the train had to come to an emergency stop and people needed to evacuate the train, you can see from the interior shot of the tunnel, there are walkways at either side to allow people to walk single-file down the tunnel. There probably will be an emergency exit and stairs positioned every quarter mile or so to allow people to get out.
 

DrewFu

Member
Apr 19, 2018
5,502
If the train had to come to an emergency stop and people needed to evacuate the train, you can see from the interior shot of the tunnel, there are walkways at either side to allow people to walk single-file down the tunnel. There probably will be an emergency exit and stairs positioned every quarter mile or so to allow people to get out.
That isn't a walkway. Those are the rails for the train.

And looking at the door for the train, unless it opens like a minivan door, I don't get how anyone is getting out of it while it's in the tunnel.
 

mute

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,185
OK but how do they get the car to that point? And how do they get you down? And how do they recover you in the middle of nowhere? lol
All the possible answers to these questions seem much more desirable than when the equivalent is asked of the next-fastest form of transportation.
 

bulbasort

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
106
Going from 3.5 hours to under 35 minutes, zero direct emissions. But yeah, better met with classical public transport.

If you were born at a different age, you would probably be saying that about horse drawn carriages.
The distance between Mumbai and Pune is roughly 150 kilometers. Taking 35 minutes to cover that distance, the average speed is 257mph. This is slightly faster than conventional trains, but not by much. The fastest conventional train in service runs at ~220mph, though the conventional speed record is 357.2 mph. This hyperloop would run at about the same speed as a maglev train (268 mph), which is at least more proven technology.
 

Tuppen

Member
Nov 28, 2017
612

MagicHobo

Member
Oct 27, 2017
779
OK but how do they get the car to that point? And how do they get you down? And how do they recover you in the middle of nowhere? lol
They'll have emergency oxygen reserves and oxygen masks, not unlike an airplane, and they will have little backup motors and deployable wheels that will drive them to the destination or a safe point should things go awry.
 

Psychotext

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,138
Is this the near vacuum version, or the "basically a tube above ground" version?

If it's a near vacuum version I'd love to know how they've got around some of the problems.
 

Allforce

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,695
I think you're overthinking it. Life's dangerous and we all have to die at some point, and with climate change on the horizon, rather sooner than later.
Might as well die trapped inside an overly futuristic gizmo that doesn't serve a function, at least none that's not better met with classical public transport.
Yeah it's much more dangerous than the current public transport in India




Weren't people clamoring for this shit in California when Elon Musk wanted to build one? Now it's actually getting done somewhere and it "doesn't serve a function"?
 

Pedrito

Member
Nov 4, 2017
1,087
Google tells me Pune is only 149 km from Mumbai. So a bullet train would get you there in about the same amount of time and it seems like it would be way cheaper than building two giant tubes (or does this go in a single direction at once?).
 

Pancho

Avenger
Nov 7, 2017
694
That looks like a big “no thanks”. Looking at the pictures alone makes my claustrophobia flare up.
 

Bramblebutt

Member
Jan 11, 2018
1,388
Supposing it has high throughput, high reliability, and manageable long-term costs, I see no issue with this. However, there have been too many failed high profile gadgetbahns for me to view this with anything more than cautious skepticism. I wholly expect this to be a waste of public resources producing an exclusive, expensive transport system for the upper class.
 

HStallion

Member
Oct 25, 2017
29,203
The issue to me is less how you get people out and more like how fast can you do it. Getting stuck in a small closed space inside a large metal tube in extreme heat seems like a great way to cook people alive.
 

_Karooo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,343
The Indian flag is a gorgeous thing. Surely they would have thought of all possible danger scenarios. Come on guys.
Google tells me Pune is only 149 km from Mumbai. So a bullet train would get you there in about the same amount of time and it seems like it would be way cheaper than building two giant tubes (or does this go in a single direction at once?).
Bullet train = cutting lots of trees.
 

Pomerlaw

Member
Feb 25, 2018
2,849

Is hyperloop safe?
Safety is our number-one priority and we’re designing hyperloop to be inherently safer and more reliable than maglev or high-speed rail. We have no at-grade crossings (by far the leading risk posed by trains), so there are no interactions with other forms of transport or wildlife. We are fully autonomous, so there is no driver related error. We are immune from most weather events. We will have multiple emergency braking techniques, triggering an immediate braking of the vehicle. Vehicles will have a full suite of life support systems, and we have the ability to re-pressurize the tube if needed. We strive to surpass the safety of all existing transport systems, and have a dedicated safety team to work with regulatory authorities to define and implement best practice safety protocols.

How is hyperloop going to get certified by safety agencies and regulators?
We realize that for this technology to be commercially viable it needs to be safe and reliable. Safety is our number-one priority and we are making sure to spend the necessary time to further develop and test our technology. While we work on our technology, we simultaneously work with governments around the world to ensure our technology is safe, regulated, and intermodal. More than two-thirds of the hyperloop systems fit under existing regulatory standards – across aerospace, rail, and automotive. But for the remaining third, we’ll need a new standard. We’ve already begun the early stages of the certification process and look forward to continuing our work with regulators to meet existing regulations where appropriate and create new ones where needed.

What happens if there's a sudden breach in the tube?
Our tubes are constructed out of thick, strong steel and are very difficult to puncture or buckle. We’re designing and constructing the tube and pods explicitly to handle down to 100 Pa of pressure or more (equivalent to air pressure at 200,000 feet above sea level), changes in air pressure, and to safely tolerate small leaks, holes, and even breaches without suffering from reduced structural integrity.
If there was a leak or breach in our tube in an operational system air would leak into the tube. The affected vehicles would slow down due to the additional air pressure, or require a power boost to get them to the next station. The pods will be built to withstand even sudden air pressure changes safely. We will also have the ability to section off parts of the route and re-pressurize sections in the case of a significant emergency. Every pod will have emergency exits if needed, but mostly pods will glide safely to the next portal (station) or egress point in the event of an emergency. Additionally, we are building sensors throughout the system to notify of any leaks or breaches and we would be able to identify and perform maintenance to resolve any leaks quickly.