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Visual Novel Community Thread: No Auto Read Required

Oct 25, 2017
24
I'm still trying to decide if I want the Switch or PS4 version for Our World is Ended. I'm more inclined to play it on Swith, but I also prefer the touched up graphics on PS4 for stuff (especially for acton JRPGs), since Switch can still be a downgrade in that regard. Being a VN though, it's still hard to decide on... So still trying to decide (halp!)
I personally prefer reading visual novels on a handheld device because it feels like a book, so visual novels on switch are an easy decision. I don't think they're be too much of a difference graphically between the two, it just more comes down to how you would prefer to play.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,876
I personally prefer reading visual novels on a handheld device because it feels like a book, so visual novels on switch are an easy decision. I don't think they're be too much of a difference graphically between the two, it just more comes down to how you would prefer to play.
I got Utawarerumono for PS4, and it's also nice to enjoy the visuals on a big screen too, but at the same time, I don't play nearly as much with a game static. I often went PS4 > Vita for most of my choices, but PS4 and Switch bridges the gap...

Still leaning towards Switch, as I have a bit more time to think on it.
 
Mar 19, 2019
137
Thanks for the impression. I just put the game into wishlist. Always support mystery VN.
Remember, though, it's more of a traditional or classic British Golden Age-styled whodunnit mystery. If you enjoy more modern-styled or more hard-boiled crime stories, it may not be something you enjoy. Like the classic British crime novel, it focuses majorly on the mystery of the crime.

A whodunit or whodunnit (a colloquial elision of "Who [has] done it?" or "Who did it?") is a complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the puzzle regarding who committed the crime is the main focus.[1] The reader or viewer is provided with the clues from which the identity of the perpetrator may be deduced before the story provides the revelation itself at its climax. The investigation is usually conducted by an eccentric, amateur, or semi-professional detective.

If you like Danganronpa or Ace Attorney, though, it's right up your alley! :)
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,670
Remember, though, it's more of a traditional or classic British Golden Age-styled whodunnit mystery. If you enjoy more modern-styled or more hard-boiled crime stories, it may not be something you enjoy. Like the classic British crime novel, it focuses majorly on the mystery of the crime.

A whodunit or whodunnit (a colloquial elision of "Who [has] done it?" or "Who did it?") is a complex, plot-driven variety of the detective story in which the puzzle regarding who committed the crime is the main focus.[1] The reader or viewer is provided with the clues from which the identity of the perpetrator may be deduced before the story provides the revelation itself at its climax. The investigation is usually conducted by an eccentric, amateur, or semi-professional detective.

If you like Danganronpa or Ace Attorney, though, it's right up your alley! :)
Sold! Ace Attorney is one of my favorite gaming series, and I love reading detective fictions. Thanks for the extra info, as I am from Asia, I am more familiar with Japanese terms like 本格派 (Honkaku Ha). It is basically the same meaning of whodunit. There are also other sub-genres including 社会派 (Syakai Ha), referring to detective stories focus on how the murder / incident reflects society. Very interesting.
 
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Mar 19, 2019
137
Sold! Ace Attorney is one of my favorite gaming series, and I love reading detective fictions. Thanks for the extra info, as I am from Asia, I am more familiar with Japanese terms like 本格派 (Honkaku Ha). It is basically the same meaning of whodunit. There are also other sub-genres including 社会派 (Syakai Ha), referring to detective stories focus on how the murder / incident reflects society. Very interesting.
This is probably worth a DM or another thread, but I'd like to hear about what detective novels you read.
 
Oct 25, 2017
250
Houston
Not sure if I mentioned this here long ago, but if you have a Switch, and know JP, then the J.B. Harold games can be fun.

They're a little archaic, but there's some charm to them. One of them(at least) is translated into english, but it's not the smoothest translation out there if that's an issue for people.
 
Mar 19, 2019
137
Not sure if I mentioned this here long ago, but if you have a Switch, and know JP, then the J.B. Harold games can be fun.
As I remember it, J.B. Harol was more of an American-styled mystery and had the staple complexity of the British a bit toned down in favor of character drama, but I remember the murder mystery aspect still being really fun and satisfying.

On the subject of Switch VN's, Will ~ A Wonderful World is fantastic. It's a "novel-puzzle" game where you play the role of a God solving people's problems by rearranging sentences in letters they send to you.

For example, "I went into the living room, and the lights went out! I went back into the bedroom" makes it so that you returned to your bedroom because the lights went out.

"I went into the living room. I went back into the bedroom, and the lights went out!" makes it so that the lights only went out after you returned to your bedroom.

The game has a lot of puzzles built around this format

Its story is told over multiple perspectives, and there's something there for everyone. The game combines all the perspectives either directly, thematically or causally into a satisfying overarching whole, and the different perspectives' different stories are all varying to a great degree.

Some are more thrilling while some are more mysterious while some are more angsty while some are more humorous. Some are more fantastical, some are more grounded. Some are more meaningful or more tactful than others, but they all play into each other directly or otherwise. There's something for everyone in at least one of the different stories, and I feel like it's hard not to get into the overarching experience even if the core puzzle mechanics work only sometimes.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,670
Watching DiGination's livestream. Yo, Kusuhara Yui's voice is so good.
This is probably worth a DM or another thread, but I'd like to hear about what detective novels you read.
Haha, mostly Japanese stuff. For English works, I do have read the whole Sherlock Holmes series and a few pieces of Agatha Christie. If you are interested in Japanese works, I would recommend starting with works by Seishi Yokomizo (Kosuke Kindachi series). Yokomizo's works reflect Japanese traditions and ideologies really well, so they are very interesting to read if you want to know more about pre-war / post-war Japan.
 
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Mar 19, 2019
137
Watching DiGination's livestream. Yo, Kusuhara Yui's voice is so good.

Haha, mostly Japanese stuff. For English works, I do have read the whole Sherlock Holmes series and a few pieces of Agatha Christie. If you are interested in Japanese works, I would recommend starting with works by Seishi Yokomizo (Kosuke Kindachi series). Yokomizo's works reflect Japanese traditions and ideologies really well, so they are very interesting to read if you want to know more about pre-war / post-war Japan.

I can't read Japanese, but I would love to read Seishi Yokomizo if a translation exists (I can't find one). He seems to be a lot like John Dickson Carr, focusing on locked room mysteries. As far as Japanese whodunits/detective novels go, I've read Zaregoto, Gosick (more Sherlockian than whodunit) and Detective Conan. Not a lot, but it's hard to find any translated into English for my dumb American brain. :( If you have any recommendations or any translations for Japanese detective novels, I'd love to see how Japan handled the whodunit outside of Ace Attorney and Danganronpa. My brain is melting with all of the English mysteries I'm pumping into it.

I love Sherlock Holmes, but he predates the Golden Age so his stories aren't exactly "whodunnits". The puzzle aspect being missing was always a small detractor for me, but Doyle was always the master of context in his stories. Never a dull Holmes mystery or story. :)

Here are some non-spoilers (spoiled to keep the post small) and recommendations for other English whodunits if you wanted to see more of the genre.

Christie's great but starts off weak. Poirot is, of course, her best series but you kinda have to get through Styles and Links before they get really good with Murder of Roger Ackroyd (and Orient Express is overrated, sorry). If you don't want to read literally every Christie ever, the best are Lord Edgware Dies, Peril at the End House and Murder of Mesopotamia (my guilty pleasure is Death in the Clouds, though). In her Miss Marple series, 4.50 from Paddington, Mirror Crack'd From Side to Side and Body in the Library are the best imho.

Non-Christie Poirots are restricted to Sophie Hanna's New Hercule Poirot Mysteries, comprised of Monogram Murders, Closed Casket and Mystery of Three Quarters. All are made of great stuff, but the mystery in Monogram is just the best and even beat out a lot of Christie's own for me. Great sense of character and mystery. Closed Casket is the worst of the three, but a strong novel in its own right.


Other great authors who should be read include:
Michael Innes and his Detective Lord Appleby series. The prose is encumbered to the point of insanity and it's damned hard to read for a native English speaker even, so it's hard to get into, but once the books hook you, their puzzles and solutions are all worth the effort. Fantastic mysteries and a decent sleuth hidden behind inaccessible prose. Very, very traditional.

S. S. Van Dine was American, not British, and it shows, but in his Philo Vance novels (or, as the popular opinion goes, the first 7 of them) he exemplifies his mastery over the whodunit genre. He also is one of the people to have written the standards and rules the writers in the genre often heavily adhere to in crafting their mysteries. The sleuth is just an awful character, but the mysteries are fantastic and there for solving.

If you ever hear anyone talk about whdounit solutions being outlandish, they probably read a John Dickson Carr novel. John Dickson Carr needs nary an introduction as the proclaimed "king of the locked room mystery". Famous for the seemingly impossible crimes, and the crazy ways in which they happen, Carr is skilled at balancing the sometimes outlandishness of his solutions with the fairness and solvability of the whodunit. Maybe not the "best", but definitely one of the most fun. His most famous detective is Dr. Gideon Fell. I read of Seishi Yokomizo as being kinda a Japanese counterpart.

Anti-semitism ran amok in the time period, but none more blatantly than in Anthony Berkley's Roger Sheringham. Early on, it suffers from the same lack of focus and pacing issues as every detective series when they first begin, but as they go on, if you can handle the sometimes shameless racism (a product of it's time), Berkley wrote few but great classic British mysteries.

Patricia Wentworth's Miss Silver series is very similar to Marple. The first book is a bit out-there as far as whodunits go, but the series eventually settles into a traditional British spinster-sleuth series. Great mysteries.

I say just "whodunits" and not "authors" because unlike the Golden Age of detective fiction, nowadays authors of whodunits don't get the traction needed to produce huge franchises, and most of the better (and more whodunit) ones are limited to a small handful of novels, if not just one.

Lucy Foley's The Hunting Party is as traditional as traditional can be. A small group of college friends take to a secluded lodge in the Scottish Highlands to hunt, but find themselves snowlocked and a body pops up, murdered. Suspicions fly wild, and the book is very traditional. A whdodunit, which the clues there and very traditional in setting and style (despite taking place in 2019).

Anthony Horowitz is one of the two people on this list to have multiple novels. For a more traditional whodunit, Magpie Murder does so in a very nontraditional manner. The book intertwines two mysteries through two different universes -- one in the book's central setting and one buried in the book-inside-a-book written by in-universe detective author -- and has the reader come to one unified solution. Great, clued whodunit, untraditional but traditionally-structured.

However, Horowitz also has Sherlockian-school mysteries. In addition to his Holmes pastiches, Horowitz wrote two novels so far about modern-day Sherlock Holmes Daniel Hawthrone in which he himself, Horowitz, co-stars as the clueless Watson. I've read The Word is Murder wherein the victim is a woman who arranged her own funeral, and is a great classic-esque Holmisan mystery, but I've not yet gotten to the sequel, The Sentence is Murder.

Robert Galbraith is J.K. Rowling but shhhhhhh we're not supposed to know! J.K. Rowling is famous for Harry Potter, but as Robert Galbraith (s)he wrote the Detective Cormoran Strike series. A bit long for the style of mystery they're inspired by, but they're great examples of the classic British-styled mystery touched up with a contemporary focus. Great at walking the line between the two.

One of Us Is Lying is called "The Breakfast Club meets Agatha Christie". It's vaguely whodunit, but is also a teen drama. If you're interested in YA novels and wanted to see how a YA murder mystery would plan out there's really not much once you get past Danganronpa and SHINRAI, so One of Us Is Lying is the clear next stop. People are a bit divided on whether her portrayal of certain issues was acceptable or not, but it's overall a fairly decent read for someone looking for a different style of whodunit.

(Sorry to hijack the thread for this whodunit stuff, I'll get back to VN talk now. ;; )
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,822
Any word on when Fata Morgana is coming to PS4? All I can find is "Q1," but time is running out on that release window.
The Vita port is ready, but as they had to rush developing that one due to the physical production deadline, the PS4 port is a little late to the party and still in development.
 
Oct 25, 2017
250
Houston
So Alicesoft is hiring for a production assistant for their new social game business. Contract position with chance of making it in permanently if you're good at the job, and not much experience needed.

Looking through it, in the application it says that development should take 1.5 years?

Assuming no delays this should get interesting. I know TADA always wants to try new things, like we had a Toushin Toshi DMM game before it failed rather spectacularly in the past.

I found it kind of interesting how hard they tried to nail down the point that unlike their competitors, everything is in-house. They repeat it a couple times in their application page.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,670
I can't read Japanese, but I would love to read Seishi Yokomizo if a translation exists (I can't find one). He seems to be a lot like John Dickson Carr, focusing on locked room mysteries. As far as Japanese whodunits/detective novels go, I've read Zaregoto, Gosick (more Sherlockian than whodunit) and Detective Conan. Not a lot, but it's hard to find any translated into English for my dumb American brain. :( If you have any recommendations or any translations for Japanese detective novels, I'd love to see how Japan handled the whodunit outside of Ace Attorney and Danganronpa. My brain is melting with all of the English mysteries I'm pumping into it.

I love Sherlock Holmes, but he predates the Golden Age so his stories aren't exactly "whodunnits". The puzzle aspect being missing was always a small detractor for me, but Doyle was always the master of context in his stories. Never a dull Holmes mystery or story. :)

Here are some non-spoilers (spoiled to keep the post small) and recommendations for other English whodunits if you wanted to see more of the genre.

Christie's great but starts off weak. Poirot is, of course, her best series but you kinda have to get through Styles and Links before they get really good with Murder of Roger Ackroyd (and Orient Express is overrated, sorry). If you don't want to read literally every Christie ever, the best are Lord Edgware Dies, Peril at the End House and Murder of Mesopotamia (my guilty pleasure is Death in the Clouds, though). In her Miss Marple series, 4.50 from Paddington, Mirror Crack'd From Side to Side and Body in the Library are the best imho.

Non-Christie Poirots are restricted to Sophie Hanna's New Hercule Poirot Mysteries, comprised of Monogram Murders, Closed Casket and Mystery of Three Quarters. All are made of great stuff, but the mystery in Monogram is just the best and even beat out a lot of Christie's own for me. Great sense of character and mystery. Closed Casket is the worst of the three, but a strong novel in its own right.


Other great authors who should be read include:
Michael Innes and his Detective Lord Appleby series. The prose is encumbered to the point of insanity and it's damned hard to read for a native English speaker even, so it's hard to get into, but once the books hook you, their puzzles and solutions are all worth the effort. Fantastic mysteries and a decent sleuth hidden behind inaccessible prose. Very, very traditional.

S. S. Van Dine was American, not British, and it shows, but in his Philo Vance novels (or, as the popular opinion goes, the first 7 of them) he exemplifies his mastery over the whodunit genre. He also is one of the people to have written the standards and rules the writers in the genre often heavily adhere to in crafting their mysteries. The sleuth is just an awful character, but the mysteries are fantastic and there for solving.

If you ever hear anyone talk about whdounit solutions being outlandish, they probably read a John Dickson Carr novel. John Dickson Carr needs nary an introduction as the proclaimed "king of the locked room mystery". Famous for the seemingly impossible crimes, and the crazy ways in which they happen, Carr is skilled at balancing the sometimes outlandishness of his solutions with the fairness and solvability of the whodunit. Maybe not the "best", but definitely one of the most fun. His most famous detective is Dr. Gideon Fell. I read of Seishi Yokomizo as being kinda a Japanese counterpart.

Anti-semitism ran amok in the time period, but none more blatantly than in Anthony Berkley's Roger Sheringham. Early on, it suffers from the same lack of focus and pacing issues as every detective series when they first begin, but as they go on, if you can handle the sometimes shameless racism (a product of it's time), Berkley wrote few but great classic British mysteries.

Patricia Wentworth's Miss Silver series is very similar to Marple. The first book is a bit out-there as far as whodunits go, but the series eventually settles into a traditional British spinster-sleuth series. Great mysteries.

I say just "whodunits" and not "authors" because unlike the Golden Age of detective fiction, nowadays authors of whodunits don't get the traction needed to produce huge franchises, and most of the better (and more whodunit) ones are limited to a small handful of novels, if not just one.

Lucy Foley's The Hunting Party is as traditional as traditional can be. A small group of college friends take to a secluded lodge in the Scottish Highlands to hunt, but find themselves snowlocked and a body pops up, murdered. Suspicions fly wild, and the book is very traditional. A whdodunit, which the clues there and very traditional in setting and style (despite taking place in 2019).

Anthony Horowitz is one of the two people on this list to have multiple novels. For a more traditional whodunit, Magpie Murder does so in a very nontraditional manner. The book intertwines two mysteries through two different universes -- one in the book's central setting and one buried in the book-inside-a-book written by in-universe detective author -- and has the reader come to one unified solution. Great, clued whodunit, untraditional but traditionally-structured.

However, Horowitz also has Sherlockian-school mysteries. In addition to his Holmes pastiches, Horowitz wrote two novels so far about modern-day Sherlock Holmes Daniel Hawthrone in which he himself, Horowitz, co-stars as the clueless Watson. I've read The Word is Murder wherein the victim is a woman who arranged her own funeral, and is a great classic-esque Holmisan mystery, but I've not yet gotten to the sequel, The Sentence is Murder.

Robert Galbraith is J.K. Rowling but shhhhhhh we're not supposed to know! J.K. Rowling is famous for Harry Potter, but as Robert Galbraith (s)he wrote the Detective Cormoran Strike series. A bit long for the style of mystery they're inspired by, but they're great examples of the classic British-styled mystery touched up with a contemporary focus. Great at walking the line between the two.

One of Us Is Lying is called "The Breakfast Club meets Agatha Christie". It's vaguely whodunit, but is also a teen drama. If you're interested in YA novels and wanted to see how a YA murder mystery would plan out there's really not much once you get past Danganronpa and SHINRAI, so One of Us Is Lying is the clear next stop. People are a bit divided on whether her portrayal of certain issues was acceptable or not, but it's overall a fairly decent read for someone looking for a different style of whodunit.

(Sorry to hijack the thread for this whodunit stuff, I'll get back to VN talk now. ;; )
Thank you for writing for these recommendations. I have heard of some of them like Appleby and John Dickson Carr. So you have just added a lot of book into my reading list lol! I can only find one translated book written by Yokomizo on Amazon - The Inugami Clan. It is one of his most famous works, and gets deep (and really dark) into the relationships of a traditional Japanese extended family. I guess the book is not popular in the west as this one is the only translated work available, which is really a huge shame as many of his works are amazing (as well as unsettling) read.

I see that you have read a few lightnovels and manga, then I definitely need to recommend you reading the Kindaichi Case File series. It is THE most famous whodunit manga alongside Detective Conan, and IMO, Kindaichi is the superior series in gore and tricks (but the original author is not responsible for writing the most recent works, so many of these later cases are ranging from mediocre to bad). I see that the earlier cases are available in English legally, so you should be able find them.

BTW, you may have noticed that both the protagonist of Yokomizo's work and the Kindaichi Case File shares the same last name (ie. Kindaichi). An interesting tidbit, protagonist of the latter (Hajime Kindaichi) always says he is the grandson of the great detective Kosuke Kindaichi (protagonist of the former). Of course, both of them are fictional characters so this is total bullshit. It is just a direct homage to Yokomizo for this contribution to Japanese detective stories. However, there is a rumor that the Yokomizo family has actually tried to sue the author of Kindaichi Case File for this "fictional" family relationship. Pretty funny.

I hope you will enjoy them both! And apologies to others for discussing mystery stuff here!
So Alicesoft is hiring for a production assistant for their new social game business. Contract position with chance of making it in permanently if you're good at the job, and not much experience needed.

Looking through it, in the application it says that development should take 1.5 years?

Assuming no delays this should get interesting. I know TADA always wants to try new things, like we had a Toushin Toshi DMM game before it failed rather spectacularly in the past.

I found it kind of interesting how hard they tried to nail down the point that unlike their competitors, everything is in-house. They repeat it a couple times in their application page.
To be honest, the only companies I remember that have achieved moderate success in the social areas are August and Ricotta (with outlier like Nitroplus which has made a big hit), and then we have Light which is struggling to get a footing on this front. Personally I support them to try getting into the business as VNs are difficult to make money, especially when the customer base is getting smaller every year due to competitions from social games as well as the lowering population in Japan. Hopefully Alicesoft will achieve some levels of success in that area, too.

Speaking of DMM, they are really investing a lot in VNs. In the coming four months, their own brand, DiGination, has four games lining up to release and all of them seem to have good production values. Their Jan title, Sorceress Alive, also received good impressions from players. I wonder if they are trying to gain some market shares in the realm as well as bringing more people to their own DMM platform.

Edit: DiGination has uploaded a trailer for their July release, Ryuusei World Actor, and it is easily my most anticipated release in the coming months. Good writer, very interesting setting, dont-give-a-fuck protagonist and Kusuhara Yui voicing one of the main girls. I have played Akatsuki no Goei (previous work of the same writer) and I like it a lot. But he is notorious for writing incomplete ending so hopefully he can end this one properly.
 
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Aters

Banned
Member
Oct 26, 2017
7,948
To be honest, the only companies I remember that have achieved moderate success in the social areas are August and Ricotta (with outlier like Nitroplus which has made a big hit), and then we have Light which is struggling to get a footing on this front. Personally I support them to try getting into the business as VNs are difficult to make money, especially when the customer base is getting smaller every year due to competitions from social games as well as the lowering population in Japan. Hopefully Alicesoft will achieve some levels of success in that area, too.
I think Lilith is doing well with the mobile game. I'm not sure if Ricotta is a VN developer anymore. Their last game was in 2015 and they've been focusing on mobile since then. Last time I heard the company only has a skeleton crew, pretty much defunct.
 
Mar 19, 2019
137
I see that you have read a few lightnovels and manga, then I definitely need to recommend you reading the Kindaichi Case File series. It is THE most famous whodunit manga alongside Detective Conan, and IMO, Kindaichi is the superior series in gore and tricks (but the original author is not responsible for writing the most recent works, so many of these later cases are ranging from mediocre to bad). I see that the earlier cases are available in English legally, so you should be able find them.
I'll definitely check these out, thank you! One more thing on mysteries before I bail and go back to VN talk, check my profile. I have synopses for my in-progress murder mystery stories if you're interested in any of them. :)
--------


I'm damned excited for Ryuusei World Actor. It's my second most anticipated release behind the SHINRAI sequel.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,670
I think Lilith is doing well with the mobile game. I'm not sure if Ricotta is a VN developer anymore. Their last game was in 2015 and they've been focusing on mobile since then. Last time I heard the company only has a skeleton crew, pretty much defunct.
Ah yes, I forget Lilith. Probably due to never care about their games. And I also don't know Ricotta is basically dead... That's a shame. Thanks for the info.
Funbag Fantasy: Sideboob Story is now on Steam, guess MG are going to bring everything they can.

edit: grammar
That title translation is amusing lmao.
I'll definitely check these out, thank you! One more thing on mysteries before I bail and go back to VN talk, check my profile. I have synopses for my in-progress murder mystery stories if you're interested in any of them. :)
--------


I'm damned excited for Ryuusei World Actor. It's my second most anticipated release behind the SHINRAI sequel.
Thanks! I will definitely take a look. BTW, I was trying to find more info on Ryuusei World Actor, and it seems that the writer said its length will be longer than 10+ volumes of lightnovel, so it is going to be a very long game. So excited to play it! Hopefully a localization company will pick it up asap so you guys can play it soon.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,793
Our World is Ended is basically Steins;gate but not as good. At least from the impressions I've seen.
Can you point me at some impressions? All I've ever found was one review of the Japanese and one (allegedly) of the western. I say allegedly because it seems weird that I can't find a single other review if review copies are out there.
Not sure if I mentioned this here long ago, but if you have a Switch, and know JP, then the J.B. Harold games can be fun.

They're a little archaic, but there's some charm to them. One of them(at least) is translated into english, but it's not the smoothest translation out there if that's an issue for people.
What's the level of Japanese like in them? I'm learning atm, so always looking for suitable material.
 
Oct 25, 2017
24
Can you point me at some impressions? All I've ever found was one review of the Japanese and one (allegedly) of the western. I say allegedly because it seems weird that I can't find a single other review if review copies are out there.


What's the level of Japanese like in them? I'm learning atm, so always looking for suitable material.
I'll need to dig them up again it was a while ago, I know one was noisy pixel. I just remember seeing that it was very very similar to Steins;gate. Not as good but still an okay read.
 
Oct 25, 2017
250
Houston
Can you point me at some impressions? All I've ever found was one review of the Japanese and one (allegedly) of the western. I say allegedly because it seems weird that I can't find a single other review if review copies are out there.


What's the level of Japanese like in them? I'm learning atm, so always looking for suitable material.
I'd have to go through it again, but I think I remember it being kind of mid-level?
 
Not sure if I mentioned this here long ago, but if you have a Switch, and know JP, then the J.B. Harold games can be fun.

They're a little archaic, but there's some charm to them. One of them(at least) is translated into english, but it's not the smoothest translation out there if that's an issue for people.
Murder Club has multiple English localizations, albeit for older platforms (MS-DOS and TurboGrafx-16), while Manhattan Requiem got a very rough English loc for the Pioneer LaserActive that's now part of the iOS port. I love them both, partly for historical value and partly because they're solid procedural mysteries with all the sordid interpersonal conflicts and class scheming you'd want. They're a great example of Rika Suzuki's adventure writing, too, before she became lead designer and writer at CING. Hotel Dusk and Another Code both trace their lineage back to Riverhill Soft's adventures on Japanese PCs of the 1980s and 1990s.

Only warning I can give for J.B. Harold is that it's possible to lock your save into an unbeatable state if you force suspects into questioning before you have all outside information. I did this with both games, unfortunately, and it pissed me off both times.

In other news, I'm back on track with finishing Akiha's route in Tsukihime. I, uh, now understand why people want a Satsuki route. There's a lot to unpack WRT her character arc. Now it's slower-going, but refreshingly different from the Near Side routes.
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,876
FYI, all 3 of the Parascientific Escape 3DS eShop titles are $3 right now. They used to only be $1 off, so at $2 off on each (plus after loading up on a sale of eShop credit...) it's a perfect time to finally grab them all.
 
Mar 31, 2018
881
Oh no, what about the Vita port?
Probably gone forever, Steiner is breaking NDA's on twitter and talking about we'll never see Kajiri Kamui Kagura and Senshinkan.
I'm assuming any and all unreleased project is now dead.

Honestly, I'm sad for people who were waiting for the vita port and the fact we won't ever see more of their titles, I cannot overstate how much this hurts.

And then spend the next year waiting for chapter 8? Forget about it, I'll start reading Higu whenever the last main chapter drops on Steam.
This perfectly sums up how I feel about the higurashi franchise.
 
Oct 25, 2017
250
Houston
Alicesoft has lucked out so many times coming from the brink and honestly should've died long ago.

Every time they're just about close their doors, they magically come up with a hit that saves them.
I love that they're able to pull that off, but man does that make me anxious. They really could die at any time.

Well they just released Evenicle 2, and a budget game for this month so they should be fine for now.


It'd probably be another smaller company next.