Vox: The diet that helps fight climate change

Biosnake

Member
Oct 25, 2017
676
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUnJQWO4YJY

tl;dw: The vegan diet is still the best for the planet in terms of carbon emissions. But if you still want meat, the Mediterranean diet also works extremely well.

edit: this video is less about veganism(because most people already know that going vegan is best for the environment) and more about the fact that a Mediterranean diet also works very well in terms of lower carbon emissions(which is good for people like me to know because i still want to eat meat).
 
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borghe

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,112
I typically opt for locally sourced free range meats. You pay through the nose, but it side steps most of the global warming issues presented by pen-raised/grain-fed animals.
 

Nerfgun

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Oct 25, 2017
3,942
Nova Scotia
I typically opt for locally sourced free range meats. You pay through the nose, but it side steps most of the global warming issues presented by pen-raised/grain-fed animals.
yeah this is what I do. find a good local-sourcing butcher. when I feel like I need to get some extra steps in I walk there, then hit the market for veggies.

That said I usually buy chicken or turkey. I have tried to cut way down on my red meat consumption and been pretty successful.
 

Devin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
607
I typically opt for locally sourced free range meats. You pay through the nose, but it side steps most of the global warming issues presented by pen-raised/grain-fed animals.
Grass fed cows still have a massive carbon footprint, which in some cases is actually worsened since it takes longer for them to grow to slaughtering size. There's also not enough land in the US for that to be viable on a large scale.
 

Jadentheman

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Oct 29, 2017
1,061
Nah it's just an excuse to justify eating meat. Nothing helps more than a vegan diet. Absolutely nothing
 

Veggen

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Oct 25, 2017
1,246
This is a helpful video to go over the hump towards vegan/vegetarian. Only looking at it as a binary problem was never the pragmatic solution for society. Reduction is helpful.
 

Ehoavash

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Oct 28, 2017
3,892
so don't eat beef eat chicken but moderatly also eat fish

I'm doing that but i'm kinda gaining weight lol ok i admit i'm eating fast food chicken a lot x.x
 
Oct 25, 2017
237
I think people are missing the point of the video, which isn’t necessarily advocating for veganism or vegetarianism. They argue for a reduction in meat consumption, and especially a reduction in ruminant meat (cows, sheep, etc.) consumption.

For those that didn’t watch, if everyone on the planet reduced red meat intake to once a month and cut other meat consumption to one meal a day, global greenhouse gas emissions could be cut by 14%. That is roughly equivalent to the emissions generated by all forms of transportation combined.

Edit: Reducing meat consumption is also the easiest way to reduce your individual impact on global warming and environmental degradation.

Depending on where you live and how local electricity is generated, an electric car might actually generate more emissions than a gas-powered car. Plus the production of electric vehicles generate a considerable amount of greenhouse gases, not to mention the materials that need to be mined and refined to produce them.
 
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Skel1ingt0n

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Oct 28, 2017
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Wonder if ResetEra will let up on the aggressive anti-vegan sentiment that the supposedly progressive “old site” used to push...
 

DiipuSurotu

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Oct 25, 2017
14,499
France
But wait Vegan-ERA! If we had a second habitable planet at disposal, and we could move to it easily in a magic spaceship, would you eat meat then? Would you??
 

MrT

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Oct 27, 2017
220
But wait Vegan-ERA! If we had a second habitable planet at disposal, and we could move to it easily in a magic spaceship, would you eat meat then? Would you??
No, because a vegan diet (actually lifestyle - vegan diet should really just be called "plant based") is about more than the environment
 

Aureon

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,026
I just dropped beef, + mediterranean diet. It's good enough, the rest is very marginal gains.

Next focus is not taking planes, but that's harsher.
 

Gloggins

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Nov 27, 2017
89
It won't convince most people. They say they care about climate change but they'll keep eating in a way that'll screw over their future generations.
 

Eros

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Oct 27, 2017
3,755
Reduced my meat consumption about 50% this year. Initially started as meatless Monday for the environment, then I started doing intermittent fasting. Eating period became a treat, so I noticed I would get legit excited about just eating a piece of fruit. So I just kept eating more fruits and finding veggie dishes I enjoy, and it because super easy. I still eat meat and I don't think I'll ever give it up completely. But about half my meals are vegetarian, if not more.
 
Oct 26, 2017
9,981
Does eating different really help? You beed a sizable base to lower production of meat. 10 people, not even 100, will not make a dent because demand is still abundant.
 

Hat22

Banned
Oct 28, 2017
1,652
Canada
Wonder if ResetEra will let up on the aggressive anti-vegan sentiment that the supposedly progressive “old site” used to push...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0MpL1KfYEJg

The electric car, easily. Eating vegan has saved me a ton of money.
Eating vegan seems to be very expensive. To have a varied diet vegans seem to need to buy ingredients from all across the globe.

I've also never seen an inexpensive vegan restaurant. Vegetarian Indian restaurants are cheap but they have milk and whatnot.
 

MrT

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Oct 27, 2017
220
Eating vegan seems to be very expensive. To have a varied diet vegans seem to need to buy ingredients from all across the globe.

I've also never seen an inexpensive vegan restaurant. Vegetarian Indian restaurants are cheap but they have milk and whatnot.
It doesn't have to be. As for restaurants, well, plenty of restaurants aren't inexpensive. But I mean you can eat vegan at taco bell if you want... And Indian restaurants are actually really good for vegan food, sure they use ghee and milk and paneer in some dishes but if you ask hey're usually really good about pointing out ones that don't have them (which will be a fair few dishes)
 

FireSafetyBear

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Oct 27, 2017
4,248
The best diet is moderation

Unless we’re only talking about climate change I guess, maybe meat in moderation, but what are the animals gonna eat if we eat their good. They got feelings.
 

plagiarize

To its ports I have been
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Oct 25, 2017
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Cape Cod, MA
The electric car, easily. Eating vegan has saved me a ton of money.
Many electric cars are cheaper than many other gasoline models too. I pay $165 a month for mine including my lease payment and fuel. I bet that's way less than most people on here pay a month for their cars.

That said I'm trying to eat less meat to help further offset my carbon footprint.
 

Kurdel

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Nov 7, 2017
9,173
I have the ingrained idea that veganism is more expensive, and see these calls for giving up meat as a complaint from the privileged aimed towards the poorer people, who can’t afford to avoid the corporate meat and food industry.

How off base am I here?
 

Dali

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,872
I recently stopped eating meat for lunch for the most part. I bought some canned vegetable soups a few weeks ago and I'll either eat one of those or I'll make a salad. The soups are actually vegan. I didmt notice that in parentheses beside ingredients until after having tried them. The no chicken noodle soup was surprisingly good. The main issue i have with the store bought stuff is be it the soups or veggie burgers/hot dogs the sodium content is like through the roof. I have no problem with the taste of vegan and vegetarian stuff though. I liked the egg free mayo, just mayo.

Still I love meat. I hope to enjoy kangaroo one day and all sorts of other exotic meats. I saw a guy cook up an ostrich egg on YouTube. It was magnificent!
 

Devin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
607
Eating vegan seems to be very expensive. To have a varied diet vegans seem to need to buy ingredients from all across the globe.

I've also never seen an inexpensive vegan restaurant. Vegetarian Indian restaurants are cheap but they have milk and whatnot.
Beans and lentils are super nutritious, and very cheap, especially if you buy in bulk. If you buy produce in season, it's usually pretty cheap as well. Being a junk food vegan can be expensive, but I don't think anyone is seriously recommending that.

Eating out at restaurants is always going to be much more expensive than making your own food, no matter what diet you have, but these days pretty much every restaurant I see has vegan options, or can modify their existing dishes to be vegan. And some of the all-vegan restaurants in my area are pretty cheap as well.

I have the ingrained idea that veganism is more expensive, and see these calls for giving up meat as a complaint from the privileged aimed towards the poorer people, who can’t afford to avoid the corporate meat and food industry.

How off base am I here?
Eating vegan can be much cheaper, especially if the diet is based around staples like beans and rice. Most of the poor around the world eat much closer to a vegan diet because it's so cheap. But in the US, food deserts complicate things, where poorer people don't always have access to these things, or the time necessary to cook.
 
Nov 1, 2017
92
Would Soylent be vegan easy mode?

The benefits of eating vegan without the hassle of learning how to put together a healthy vegan meal.

Maybe cheaper as well? Not sure about that.
 
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borghe

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,112
Grass fed cows still have a massive carbon footprint, which in some cases is actually worsened since it takes longer for them to grow to slaughtering size. There's also not enough land in the US for that to be viable on a large scale.
they don't, that's the point. the acreage of pasture needed per cow basically makes it impossible for them to have a sizable carbon footprint. Also they have significantly less waste by not being forced to consume the tons (literally) of grain that their digestive tracts are unable to handle.

HOWEVER, your last point is indeed valid, at least at a scale by which we have cheap beef available now. But I don't care, in that poor people certainly don't have a right to beef/etc. And if it works its way outside of my price range, then that's the way it is. The same how wild caught fish is an arm and a leg ($30/lb for some salmon depending on where you live)... but you get what you pay for. food raised an an environmentally responsible way (that is almost always healthier for you) costs money. if the world did away with the less environmentally responsible stuff for vegan alternatives, I'd be for that.. and still pay for the real meats.
 

farmland

Member
Oct 30, 2017
294
I'm glad to see this being talked about. I went vegan firstly to reduce direct animal suffering and secondly due to environmental concerns. It took me a few years but it wasn't that hard and I don't miss meat.

Plenty of people could easily reduce the amount they consume and it'd be a big help. It's the easiest thing you can do individually, though of course the problem is a systemic one so it'll only do so much.
 

GenericForumName

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Nov 26, 2017
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I'm gonna continue stuffing my face with meat pizza until scientists figure out a good replacement for meat.
 

PinkSpider

Member
Oct 27, 2017
281
Same here (farmland), it's pretty cheap if you do it right, pretty easy and I've even reduced the amount of meat alternatives I've been eating this year (never really ate meat and they're often on offer/reduced to clear but feeling so much better since getting in to Middle Eastern food and lots of Veggie mezze).

I read (I think this morning) that the UK government are planning to tax meat in order to try and curb people's consumption of the stuff and hopefully help the planet (and animals).

And I will agree with someone above but I won't call it out; certain web forums have been needlessly rude and abusive to Vegans based on a small volume of anecdotal evidence (from a small populace) in which they can't really back up.
 

Chekhonte

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Oct 31, 2017
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they don't, that's the point. the acreage of pasture needed per cow basically makes it impossible for them to have a sizable carbon footprint. Also they have significantly less waste by not being forced to consume the tons (literally) of grain that their digestive tracts are unable to handle.

HOWEVER, your last point is indeed valid, at least at a scale by which we have cheap beef available now. But I don't care, in that poor people certainly don't have a right to beef/etc. And if it works its way outside of my price range, then that's the way it is. The same how wild caught fish is an arm and a leg ($30/lb for some salmon depending on where you live)... but you get what you pay for. food raised an an environmentally responsible way (that is almost always healthier for you) costs money. if the world did away with the less environmentally responsible stuff for vegan alternatives, I'd be for that.. and still pay for the real meats.
I'm Native American for all intents and purposes have an unlimited quantity of salmon for self use I can catch mostly Chinook around here. They are vile looking, massive fish. Their mouths make them look like they are a cursed animal that eats tar but they are tasty.

 
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Dracon

Member
Oct 27, 2017
332
I'd rather let cars goes away so I can keep the meat.

Funny how this subject always seems to forget about the corn,soy and wheat fields that run for miles and destroy the vegetation, habitat and our health