Warhammer 40,000 |OT| In the Grim Darkness of the 40K Era There Is Only War

Xaszatm

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Oct 25, 2017
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For context, G-man is proclaiming his brother as the Emperor of Imperium Secundus (the worlds that got cut off from the rest of the Imperium by a huge Warp storm). Sanguinius isn't exactly thrilled about it, but knows he's the best choice for the job as they have no idea how to get out and if Terra even still stands.
Oh I'm aware of the context. It's just a very silly picture.

Also it is amusing that he's doing the same damn thing again almost immediately after being revived.
 

Tacitus

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Oct 25, 2017
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Oh I'm aware of the context. It's just a very silly picture.

Also it is amusing that he's doing the same damn thing again almost immediately after being revived.
Hey, this time he's taking the reins of the Imperium proper by himself.

.... or did you mean handling the command of Imperium Nihilus to Dante?
 

Drax

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Oct 25, 2017
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The blood angel terminator chase captain figure from space marine heroes 2 is pretty bad ass. Too bad it will be impossible to get him.
 

Dragon's Game

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so this is what Space Marine 2 and 3 would of been about

"
“I had some big plans for Titus” he explains “The second part of his story was to focus on a ‘Titus Unleashed’ plot—basically there were forces arrayed against him that would see his loyalty to the Adeptus Astartes pushed to its limit, and his reaction would be to kind of ‘go rogue,’ and we'd see a different Titus, not quite as in control as we saw him in Space Marine. He would be kicked out as a consequence—exiled, which would basically be a death sentence for him.”

“He would survive, and come back even stronger in the third game, where other Space Marines still loyal to him would rally around him and he'd return to ‘clean house,’ but as the head of a brand new Chapter that we would build around him,” van Lierop continued."

thoughts? https://www.beastsofwar.com/warhammer-40k/happened-space-marines-captain-titus/
 

Siggy-P

Avenger
Mar 18, 2018
6,347
so this is what Space Marine 2 and 3 would of been about

"
“I had some big plans for Titus” he explains “The second part of his story was to focus on a ‘Titus Unleashed’ plot—basically there were forces arrayed against him that would see his loyalty to the Adeptus Astartes pushed to its limit, and his reaction would be to kind of ‘go rogue,’ and we'd see a different Titus, not quite as in control as we saw him in Space Marine. He would be kicked out as a consequence—exiled, which would basically be a death sentence for him.”

“He would survive, and come back even stronger in the third game, where other Space Marines still loyal to him would rally around him and he'd return to ‘clean house,’ but as the head of a brand new Chapter that we would build around him,” van Lierop continued."

thoughts? https://www.beastsofwar.com/warhammer-40k/happened-space-marines-captain-titus/
Lore wise this would be awesome, if questionable, but regardless more suited to a character that wasn't past of the Ultramarines. The idea of "return to clean house" would have big implications for the Ultramarines if they went this route.
 

Siggy-P

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Mar 18, 2018
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I'm not a fan of Cadian's mustard fatigues but I like the boxy mass-produced look of their armor. There's something about how it's alway looks like it doesn't fit properly that gives them a sort of Redshirt look.



Alsoy favourite piece of art that encapsulates all that the Guard is about:

 

Nazo

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Oct 25, 2017
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Always loved the Death Corp of Kreig



Maccabian Janissaries are my second favorite though.

 

Dragon's Game

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me personally, I go with the Catachan Jungle Fighters.

they are probably the toughest regiment, not necessarry the best skilled or the best combatants, but they live in the shittiest planet in the whole Imperium

 

Dragon's Game

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I always wondered, why there was never a Malcador tier human in the past 10,000 years, he was arguably the most powerful normal human psyker ever, only the Emperor and possibly Magnus were more powerful
 

Cvie

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Oct 25, 2017
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I always wondered, why there was never a Malcador tier human in the past 10,000 years, he was arguably the most powerful normal human psyker ever, only the Emperor and possibly Magnus were more powerful
chaos is alot more active in the last 10k. Their heads prob exploded into demons, either that or blammed by an inqiusitor/assasin.
 

Maledict

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Oct 25, 2017
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Weren’t their rumours he was the emperors natural son or something?

Also, re the size of primarchs and marines. It’s all a bit silly really considering that being bigger offers no real advantages in combat or warfare. But does being a huge amount of disadvantages - I mean, the primarchs from that front cover won’t be able to fit into normal buildings.

Making your leaders physically huge is doing nothing but painting a huge target on them. Their guns don’t shoot better because they are big. Their strategies don’t work better because they are big. It’s just easier to hit them.
 
Oct 31, 2017
3,500


I also really like this bunch of posh fucks:



Scintillan Fusiliers, from the Calixis Sector (The Dark Heresy and Deathwatch RPG books are well worth reading for the fluff alone). A bunch of arrogant bastards, known for 'accidentally' calling artillery strikes on their less posh brethren.
 

Keasar

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Oct 25, 2017
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Skövde, Sweden
Tanith's First and Only

Love their stubborness to refuse to get oblitirated no matter how many awful missions their Commanders send them on, and then how they absorb the leftovers of just about everyone to become a quite unique regiment.
 

Redcrayon

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Oct 27, 2017
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Is Gaunt a good commissar or is he as bad as Cain?
Gaunt is an amazingly competent imperial officer but a terrible Commissar in a very different way- he’s a colonel-Commissar which gives a conflict of interest between discipline and command. He’s smart enough to delegate to Victor Hark though, who’s very good at his job. Perhaps a bit too good, as Gaunt initially dislikes Hark being a bit of a political animal. Still, the Tanith books work really well- it allows Gaunt to realise he’s conflicted and also soften Hark over time. Later on Ludd is introduced as a junior Commissar which shows another side to all three of them as roles change slightly again.

Cain’s books, as Veil comments in the footnotes, focus largely on his point of view, but I like the way the huge amount of viewpoints in the Ghosts books shows just how seperate Gaunt is from his troops, twice over.

I’ve been reading both series since the start and find them some of the best 40k ones going. To be fair, Cain is a far better (and nicer) officer than his literary inspiration of Harry Flashman, and has an Inquisitor vouching for his skill, nuance, intelligence and social skills, all of which aren’t bad traits in the job role I suppose.

Just finished reading the latest books in both series (Anarch and Know your Enemies).
 
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Siggy-P

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Mar 18, 2018
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Gaunt is an amazingly competent imperial officer but a terrible Commissar in a very different way- he’s a colonel-Commissar which gives a conflict of interest between discipline and command. He’s smart enough to delegate to Victor Hark though, who’s very good at his job. Perhaps a bit too good, as Gaunt initially dislikes Hark being a bit of a political animal. Still, the Tanith books work really well- it allows Gaunt to realise he’s conflicted and also soften Hark over time. Later on Ludd is introduced as a junior Commissar which shows another side to all three of them as roles change slightly again.

Cain’s books, as Veil comments in the footnotes, focus largely on his point of view, but I like the way the huge amount of viewpoints in the Ghosts books shows just how seperate Gaunt is from his troops, twice over.

I’ve been reading both series since the start and find them some of the best 40k ones going. To be fair, Cain is a far better (and nicer) officer than his literary inspiration of Harry Flashman, and has an Inquisitor vouching for his skill, nuance, intelligence and social skills, all of which aren’t bad traits in the job role I suppose.

Just finished reading the latest books in both series (Anarch and Know your Enemies).
Yeah, being real Gaunts a good leader but really should have done something about Rawne.
 

Redcrayon

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Yeah, being real Gaunts a good leader but really should have done something about Rawne.
I always thought that was an illustration of how bad an idea being a colonel-Commissar is. It works (barely, until they really mess up or embrace heresy) when your officer core are a crowd you’ve promoted yourself, but he was saddled with Rawne at the start, when he didn’t know the Tanith very well and had Corbec, as the embodiment of the best bits of the Tanith, to mediate between him and Rawne, representing the ruthless side. After that, he couldn’t get rid of Rawne without losing the fledgling trust the regiment had in him. I think a Gaunt by the later books would have sidelined him immediately, but he made a bad choice early on and felt like he had to live with it as a personal vendetta meant little compared to actual command competence when making difficult decisions under fire, which Rawne had. Gaunt has few character flaws but I like to think that’s one of them, keeping people around as a reminder of his own mistake for personal flaggelation, rather than doing what’s best for the regiment. Admittedly it’s a worrying potential abuse of power to be able to both bin and prosecute your own junior staff. Ultimately so many of the worst personnel come through Rawne’s mob... :D
 
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Avengers23

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Oct 25, 2017
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9th Vostroyan Firstborn Regiment, the Old Irascibles
Earning their name the "Old Irascibles" through hundreds of battles, the vaunted 9th Vostroyan Regiment served for three and a half centuries during the late 41st Millennium. The 9th Vostroyan became one of the most veteran formations in the Segmentum Obscurus, before finally meeting their match on the world of Nimbosa. Around 790.M41, the 9th Vostroyan defended the Imperial world of Nimbosa against the Tau's effort to expand their burgeoning alien empire and annex the world. The Vostroyan regiment heroically sacrificed themselves to a man defending the factory city of Polia. Inspired by the Vostroyans' sacrifice, the populace refuse to submit to the Tau Empire. Reformed after their destruction on Nimbosa, the 9th Vostroyan once again met their ultimate fate during the Fall of Karak Prime in 998.M41. They held the hive city for 18 months against the brutal onslaught of a splinter fleet of Hive Fleet Moloch, valiantly facing a Tyranid swarm that stretched from the base of the city's walls to the distant horizon. With the onset of midwinter, and with the rapid depletion of ammunition and supplies, the 9th Vostroyan knew that they were doomed and vowed to sell their lives dearly. Only when the bulk of the Tyranid swarm had passed into the city did the regiment detonate its nucleonic stack, incinerating the hive, its defenders and an estimated 85% of the Tyranid swarm. With the coming of midwinter, the few surviving Tyranid organisms eventually starved to death and the splinter fleet was entirely defeated.
 

Siggy-P

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Mar 18, 2018
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I always thought that was an illustration of how bad an idea being a colonel-Commissar is. It works (barely, until they really mess up or embrace heresy) when your officer core are a crowd you’ve promoted yourself, but he was saddled with Rawne at the start, when he didn’t know the Tanith very well and had Corbec, as the embodiment of the best bits of the Tanith, to mediate between him and Rawne, representing the ruthless side. After that, he couldn’t get rid of Rawne without losing the fledgling trust the regiment had in him. I think a Gaunt by the later books would have sidelined him immediately, but he made a bad choice early on and felt like he had to live with it as a personal vendetta meant little compared to actual command competence when making difficult decisions under fire, which Rawne had. Gaunt has few character flaws but I like to think that’s one of them, keeping people around as a reminder of his own mistake for personal flaggelation, rather than doing what’s best for the regiment. Admittedly it’s a worrying potential abuse of power to be able to both bin and prosecute your own junior staff. Ultimately so many of the worst personnel come through Rawne’s mob... :D
I feel like a Commissar would be a more effective concept of they worked in teams. A single commissar on his own is basically asking to be shot in the back.

Certainly ofcourse Gaunts "don't kill my own men" idea is best.

Worth noting that in real life the number of people executed in WW2 by Commissars is apparently only about 300 (as opposed to the assumed tens of thousands before) and that the reason Commissars were so effective was because of various methods from giving motivational speeches about freedom and constantly reassuring them they were doing the right thing for the motherland.
 

Xaszatm

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Oct 25, 2017
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I feel like a Commissar would be a more effective concept of they worked in teams. A single commissar on his own is basically asking to be shot in the back.

Certainly ofcourse Gaunts "don't kill my own men" idea is best.

Worth noting that in real life the number of people executed in WW2 by Commissars is apparently only about 300 (as opposed to the assumed tens of thousands before) and that the reason Commissars were so effective was because of various methods from giving motivational speeches about freedom and constantly reassuring them they were doing the right thing for the motherland.
So basically....what Commissar Cain does.
 

Redcrayon

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Yes.

When we call Cain bad, we're not saying he's bad as a leader, we're saying he's not doing what the Imperium wants a Commissar to do. He's better at being an effective leader than at shooting his own men.
This is what I love about the Cain books. Sandy Mitchell originally wondered if there was room for comedy in the Imperium, but satire and comedy go hand-in-hand. As such Cain, while thinking that he himself is a workshy coward and a disgrace to the Emperor, comes across as the ‘only sane man’ instead. He’s actually one of the more relatable characters in a world of space angels and walking castles and spaceships powered by faith etc, and because of that charisma, it ironically makes him a good Commissar. Which then works wonderfully in the irony of literally being a poster-boy for the Imperium, lampshaded by those posters being the book covers, and inverted again by that art having him with massive muscles and striking heroic poses like a citadel miniature, in contrast to his usual battlefield position crouched behind a wall like a sane person!

I’m sure there are many reasons for GW’s current success, but I like to think it’s become better at laughing at itself over the last decade, rediscovering the grim satire in the origins of it’s worlds. Their ‘regimental standard’ blog pieces are good too, I wonder if the footnotes are inspired by the Cain books.

https://regimental-standard.com/
 

Dragon's Game

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One of Roboute's failures as leader of the Imperium since his return is that he refused to change the governmental structure of the Imperium, why not break up the empire and introduce a socialism/communism or a social democracy, why someone of his incredible intellect continue the trend of authoritarianism?
 

Tacitus

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Oct 25, 2017
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Wait a second why is Cain a bad commissar? He still fulfills his mission of "inspire the troops to go to their deaths" even if he doesn't (visually anyways) do the public execution thing.
His character is... lacking, for a Schola graduate.
To my drug addled-mind, the voice sounded like that of the Emperor Himself, and I found myself wondering if I should have spent a bit more time in the temple and a bit less in bars, gambling dens and bordellos, but it seemed a little late to be worrying about that now. If I had indeed arrived at the Golden Throne, I'd just have to hope its occupant was in a good mood, and try to steer the conversation on to safer ground at the earliest opportunity.
 

ShadowSwordmaster

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Oct 25, 2017
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One of Roboute's failures as leader of the Imperium since his return is that he refused to change the governmental structure of the Imperium, why not break up the empire and introduce a socialism/communism or a social democracy, why someone of his incredible intellect continue the trend of authoritarianism?
Because he would start a civil war if he would do anything radical to what you are wanting him to do. There are parties within the Imperium that do not like Roboute one of which is the Inquisition.
 
Oct 30, 2017
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How would you guys feel if Games Workshop moves to a digital subscription publishing platform for army books and campaigns? What would make it worth it for you?
 

Xaszatm

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Oct 25, 2017
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How would you guys feel if Games Workshop moves to a digital subscription publishing platform for army books and campaigns? What would make it worth it for you?
MAKE THEM PDF'S! Their epub3 usage means their codexes and battletomes are near worthless on Windows machines. That and make sure they are cheaper than buying them individually.
 
Oct 26, 2017
8,635
speaking of Russ, he seems to be the rumored next loyalist primarch to come back, but its been 2 years since Roboute's return

i wonder if Roboute will truly be the only loyalist primarch to return
I kind of hope we get no more. From a narrative perspective, it seems impropable to think no character would eventually find their death. Yet once introduced on the table top for 40k, you know they won't take them away. "Sorry, Morty is dead now. Can't use him." So, tension is removed in the books when you know certain folks have plot armor due to the game itself. Unless I'm wrong and this has happened before?
 

Redcrayon

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I kind of hope we get no more. From a narrative perspective, it seems impropable to think no character would eventually find their death. Yet once introduced on the table top for 40k, you know they won't take them away. "Sorry, Morty is dead now. Can't use him." So, tension is removed in the books when you know certain folks have plot armor due to the game itself. Unless I'm wrong and this has happened before?
This happened all the time in WFB. It became quite unwieldy keeping track of which characters were alive over the 2,000+ years of history, and often special characters lived and died hundreds of years before the ‘present setting’ and primarily existed as the main antagonist of a ‘historical’ campaign invading the Empire, like some of the Orc warlords, necromancers like Dieter Hellschnict (the chap on a manticore) or vampires killed in the Carstein family background. It didn’t stop the models being sold or the character being present in the army books, although, with the undead ones, it’s not like being dead ever stopped them :D

Some of my favourite WFB games and campaigns were set ‘historically’ with limits on which units weren’t available too, due to tech level or them not having been founded. Often relatively new artillery or specialised units weren’t available, that kind of thing, but then with most special characters you could always use them as a similar character of the same type- nobody minded if your elf dude on a griffon wasnt specifically Eltharion, and in later games no one cared that he had been blinded according to the lore after a certain point, becoming a swordmaster on foot instead. Not so easy to do with primarchs, but then I don’t really see why Robbie G would be rocking up for every skirmish anyway. Reminds me of games I used to play where a border skirmish between 30 Eldar and 20 chaos marines was somehow enough for Eldrad and Abbadon to get out of bed too...
 
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