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Watchmen |OT| HBO Lost Moore's Leftovers

Burt

Member
Oct 28, 2017
3,060
Yeah that's exactly like fighting a being that is basically god.
I'd say the situation is probably more analogous to North Korea getting nuclear weapons than anything you could come up with regarding the KKK. It's been 60 years since Dr. Manhattan was created. Six decades of study in any new field is going to increase understanding of it exponentially, and I doubt there was anything more studied in the Watchmen-world since the accident than Dr. Manhattan and intrinsic fields. Given time, that knowledge would could both itself proliferate and get caught up to by less capable parties that had a general idea of which direction to head in.

Manhattan's a god, and I'm with you in that he's probably going to shrug this off after some twists and turns, but the technology that created him was from a lab in New Jersey in the late '50s. It was never going to be exclusive forever.
 

Duane

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
2,982
Manhattan won't die. It'll be like the Manhattan vs Ozymandias "fight". It'll seem like they got him for a minute, then he'll reform and say lol please.
 

litebrite

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,066
Presumably 7k is descended from the Cyclops people who had mind control tech in the 1920's. You seem to be making the common misconception that racists are dumb instead of just plain evil.
I think simply calling racists or somebody with racist beliefs "pure evil" is silly and an oversimplication of it. As the show points out, our country was built on it. It's part of our history and culture, and why it's legacy continues.
 

Billfisto

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,022
Canada
Is it just me or was episode 5 like really dull compared to the rest of them? Was I the only one that in the beginning thought that Christian dude campaigning at the amusement park was Laurie's lanky sex partner? They looked a lot alike. Also I'm finding in general Wade/Looking Glass has been the least interesting character.
No way, it's probably my favorite episode thus far. I was predisposed towards liking the character to begin with, but that episode cemented it.

It built up the character and explained quite a few things about him (his mask and ability to discern people's true feelings) in an organic and satisfying way.

So are we supposed to accept that Angela has known her husband is secretly Dr. Manhattan all this time? Why was she surprised when Lady Trieu was like "Yo did you know Dr. Manhattan lives here!???? Don't you wanna know who he is??" Was the idea with that scene that she was pretending not to know? Why does she accept that her husband is Dr. Manhattan? This twist just seems so out of nowhere.
Yes. She was surprised that Trieu knew Cal was Manhattan, and didn't want to give it away. Trieu was taunting her by asking "don't you want to know who it is?", basically saying that she knew Angela already knew who it was.

Angela lying to Trieu was basically a thing throughout the entire episode.

I buy that Angela knew. The episode also clearly set up that for her entire life, Angela's had people coming into her life and suddenly leaving. I fully buy that she'd be willing to pretend she had a happy, somewhat normal life for that time. She's already living a pretend life as a baker to her community and kids, why not also pretend that Cal's normal?

Why did Lady Trieu clone her mom, exactly? Did they explain that? I'm gonna guess the answer for this next question is nobody knows, but what is the deal with the Millenium Clock? Also does Lady Trieu seriously have like one employee that isn't her mom-daughter working at her business which is worth over a trillion dollars (I'm referring to that one woman with the hard hat)?
At this point I don't really think the main plot involves her daughter being her mother. I think it's just more getting the audience used to the idea of cloning existing in this universe.
  1. Introduce cloning in the weirdo Ozymandias storyline.
  2. Confirm that cloning exists in the real world with the dog.
  3. Confirm that human cloning with memory implantation exists in the real world with the daughter.
We're probably leading up to a twist with one of the main characters revealed to be a clone or something.

Okay so...Adrian Veidt is on Europa? How? I don't get this stuff at all to be honest. When the Game Warden yanks his back, he like warps back. So was he on that satellite? Where is this idyllic countryside supposed to be? Who is he trying to ask to save him? What is the deal with the fetuses in the river? Why is he making this play? Didn't he purposefully bow out of the public eye in the first place? So how did he end up imprisoned? Maybe my lack of deep familiarity with the source material around Watchmen is hindering me here because I honest to god do not understand what is going on here at all.
I'm not sure the Veidt stuff is meant to be taken at face value. It's either a real, existing world that was set up by Dr. Manhattan creating a reality, so it's not beholden to our rules. Or, it could all just be in Veidt's head and not a physical location.

Right now I think that it's a pocket universe with a weak spot that lets out on Europa or something. It's a countryside because Manhattan was trying to make a natural habitat that would accomodate Viedt, presumably so he'd be happy and not try to escape. The clones are there to serve him and provide companionship, again to try and keep him there. Since it's a created reality, the process behind the riverbabies doesn't need to make logical sense.
 

abellwillring

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,401
Austin, TX
It's a huge shame they don't do an inside the episode for this. Really strange. Obviously the podcast is scratching that itch a bit, but those little featurettes are so nice and HBO does them for most of their shows so it's weird to not have it.
 

JCX

Member
Oct 25, 2017
715
I think simply calling racists or somebody with racist beliefs "pure evil" is silly and an oversimplication of it. As the show points out, our country was built on it. It's part of our history and culture, and why it's legacy continues.
You've misunderstood the point of the reply you quoted, which is saying the common misconception that racists are all dumb and thus incapable of complex tasks (history disproves this time and again). It's the most banal forms of evil (like institutional racism) that often are the most dangerous.
 

litebrite

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,066
You've misunderstood the point of the reply you quoted, which is saying the common misconception that racists are all dumb and thus incapable of complex tasks (history disproves this time and again). It's the most banal forms of evil (like institutional racism) that often are the most dangerous.
I didn't misunderstand your post. I agreed with everything you said up until you said "pure evil" which is why I only addressed that part.
 

dtraposo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,060
No way, it's probably my favorite episode thus far. I was predisposed towards liking the character to begin with, but that episode cemented it.

It built up the character and explained quite a few things about him (his mask and ability to discern people's true feelings) in an organic and satisfying way.
Hmm, yeah, I don't know, agree to disagree on this one. Didn't really interest me all that much.

Yes. She was surprised that Trieu knew Cal was Manhattan, and didn't want to give it away. Trieu was taunting her by asking "don't you want to know who it is?", basically saying that she knew Angela already knew who it was.

Angela lying to Trieu was basically a thing throughout the entire episode.

I buy that Angela knew. The episode also clearly set up that for her entire life, Angela's had people coming into her life and suddenly leaving. I fully buy that she'd be willing to pretend she had a happy, somewhat normal life for that time. She's already living a pretend life as a baker to her community and kids, why not also pretend that Cal's normal?
Okay, yeah, that makes sense thematically when you put it that way. I think Angela's attempt at pretending she doesn't know what Trieu is talking about is presendted weirdly obliquely though and seems like it's done that way to make when she beats Cal over the head the real micdrop moment, but given how other posters have reacted ends up seeming just kind of confusing.

At this point I don't really think the main plot involves her daughter being her mother. I think it's just more getting the audience used to the idea of cloning existing in this universe.
  1. Introduce cloning in the weirdo Ozymandias storyline.
  2. Confirm that cloning exists in the real world with the dog.
  3. Confirm that human cloning with memory implantation exists in the real world with the daughter.
We're probably leading up to a twist with one of the main characters revealed to be a clone or something.
But wasn't the introduction of the cloning concept the whole point of the part where we're first introduced to Lady Trieu at that egg lady's house? Maybe that implies there's a deeper plot reason for the mom daughter existing. (Also how does Trieu make a biological descendant of that couple in the first place? Does she get their DNA? If so, how? Why does she need that house/land? Does she need it for the Millennium Clock development? Isn't that project like already done by that point? Unless it was timed out that way for the meteor strike which I don't really understand what that was about.)

I'm not sure the Veidt stuff is meant to be taken at face value. It's either a real, existing world that was set up by Dr. Manhattan creating a reality, so it's not beholden to our rules. Or, it could all just be in Veidt's head and not a physical location.

Right now I think that it's a pocket universe with a weak spot that lets out on Europa or something. It's a countryside because Manhattan was trying to make a natural habitat that would accomodate Viedt, presumably so he'd be happy and not try to escape. The clones are there to serve him and provide companionship, again to try and keep him there. Since it's a created reality, the process behind the riverbabies doesn't need to make logical sense.
But if it's meant to be some sort of placating fantasy, why does he get arrested and tried in contempt of law? Unless that's also part of his fantasy? But then why would he be trying to escape?

Are you forcing yourself to watch this show?
I enjoy the show but have questions about it. Sue me.
 

Mr. President

Member
Oct 27, 2017
737
Trieu is probably also a clone of her mother, no?
The Trieu article on Peteypedia states “Lady Trieu has no father” and that she is raising her daughter "in the manner of her mother." I.E. raising her to be a copy of herself.
When she mentions her father will be here soon, maybe she means Veidt who developed the cloning technology.
 

abrack

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
1,122
DFW
So I just caught up and here's some errant thoughts/questions:

Is it just me or was episode 5 like really dull compared to the rest of them? Was I the only one that in the beginning thought that Christian dude campaigning at the amusement park was Laurie's lanky sex partner? They looked a lot alike. Also I'm finding in general Wade/Looking Glass has been the least interesting character.
Episode 5 is my favorite so far, and judging by the reactions in this thread when it aired it was pretty popular. I'm sure you're not TECHNICALLY the *only one* but definitely in the minority.

So Keene/Cyclops/The Seventh Kavalry's plan is to kill Dr. Manhattan and thus...become Dr. Manhattan(s)? How would killing him make them become him? There doesn't seem to be any obvious correlation there but I read Watchmen 10 years ago and only read the Wikipedia synopsis of the original graphic novel to get a little refresher before watching this show, so maybe I'm forgetting some attribute of his superpowerdom which would lead to dead Dr. Manhattan (also how do they plan to kill him? With their silly mesmerism strobe light? How does that thing work for like literally everybody? How did Cyclops pull something like that off during World War 2?) = steal Dr. Manhattan's powers.
We don't know details of how they plan to kill or become Dr. Manhattan, we'll presumably find out when they try to put it into action (and probably fail).

So are we supposed to accept that Angela has known her husband is secretly Dr. Manhattan all this time? Why was she surprised when Lady Trieu was like "Yo did you know Dr. Manhattan lives here!???? Don't you wanna know who he is??" Was the idea with that scene that she was pretending not to know? Why does she accept that her husband is Dr. Manhattan? This twist just seems so out of nowhere.
We are supposed to accept Angela has known her husband is Dr. Manhattan, they way she talks to him at the end made it very clear that it's something she was aware of and they had planned for. "We always knew this would happen eventually" or whatever. The preview for next week also showed them meeting and talking, we're clearly going to learn way more about this but there's no doubt she knew and was trying to throw Trieu off.

Why did Lady Trieu clone her mom, exactly? Did they explain that? I'm gonna guess the answer for this next question is nobody knows, but what is the deal with the Millenium Clock? Also does Lady Trieu seriously have like one employee that isn't her mom-daughter working at her business which is worth over a trillion dollars (I'm referring to that one woman with the hard hat)?
She said she wanted her parents to see her big accomplishment. Nobody knows about the clock yet but good bet it has something to do with mesmerism and/or manipulating/erasing memories.

Okay so...Adrian Veidt is on Europa? How? I don't get this stuff at all to be honest. When the Game Warden yanks his back, he like warps back. So was he on that satellite? Where is this idyllic countryside supposed to be? Who is he trying to ask to save him? What is the deal with the fetuses in the river? Why is he making this play? Didn't he purposefully bow out of the public eye in the first place? So how did he end up imprisoned? Maybe my lack of deep familiarity with the source material around Watchmen is hindering me here because I honest to god do not understand what is going on here at all.
He seems to be in some sort of weird pocket dimension or something on Europa. Seems like there's some invisible barrier and once you pass it you appear on the moon. A lot of your questions seem to be "Why hasn't this thing been answered yet?" and the answer is "It'll probably get answered in the next 2 episodes." Fingers crossed.

Why does Veidt want Redford in office? He's in whatever-prison so he has like no connection to Earth, so it's not like he can use Redford as a puppet.
Veidt definitely did not plan on being where he is, and Redford has been in office for 2+ decades already. Certainly well before Veidt was imprisoned.
 

JCX

Member
Oct 25, 2017
715
I didn't misunderstand your post. I agreed with everything you said up until you said "pure evil" which is why I only addressed that part.
It's more a classification than an oversimplification. We're in a conversion whose context is about American racism. If this were a larger discussion about multiple forms of discrimination and I said "hey racism is just pure evil like sexism/homophobia/etc", I could see how that would be oversimplifying things. Feels like a reply to a point I wasn't making.
 
Sep 7, 2018
858
I've watched the first two episodes and I still don't know why this is called Watchmen. It has nothing to do with the comic outside of some easter eggs and references. I'm not sure when this takes place in comparison to the source material. Is it right after the end of the book? Years later? I don't know. I'm still trying to find out how the police became the superheroes when they were outlawed and hunting them down in the comic.
 

litebrite

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,066
It's more a classification than an oversimplification. We're in a conversion whose context is about American racism. If this were a larger discussion about multiple forms of discrimination and I said "hey racism is just pure evil like sexism/homophobia/etc", I could see how that would be oversimplifying things. Feels like a reply to a point I wasn't making.
I just think calling racists as "pure evil" isn't recognizing why people are racist and simplifying it to "pure evilness" has taken over them like they fell to the darkside. Of course this wasn't a reply to your point you were making, only me addressing something I didn't agree with while you were making your point which I agree with in general. LOL
 

Doomsayer

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
2,338
I've watched the first two episodes and I still don't know why this is called Watchmen. It has nothing to do with the comic outside of some easter eggs and references. I'm not sure when this takes place in comparison to the source material. Is it right after the end of the book? Years later? I don't know. I'm still trying to find out how the police became the superheroes when they were outlawed and hunting them down in the comic.
The first 2 (or 3) episodes are about world building and getting you introduced to the characters.

Episode 4 is when things start to come together and the bigger picture *starts* to get revealed. Stick with the show, trust me. It's a wild ride.
 

Lifejumper

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,218
I've watched the first two episodes and I still don't know why this is called Watchmen. It has nothing to do with the comic outside of some easter eggs and references. I'm not sure when this takes place in comparison to the source material. Is it right after the end of the book? Years later? I don't know. I'm still trying to find out how the police became the superheroes when they were outlawed and hunting them down in the comic.
Maybe continue watching?
 

Neoweee

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,110
I've watched the first two episodes and I still don't know why this is called Watchmen. It has nothing to do with the comic outside of some easter eggs and references. I'm not sure when this takes place in comparison to the source material. Is it right after the end of the book? Years later? I don't know. I'm still trying to find out how the police became the superheroes when they were outlawed and hunting them down in the comic.
Maybe you should watch literally 3 more minutes of the show.
 

Bigwombat

Member
Nov 30, 2018
973
I've watched the first two episodes and I still don't know why this is called Watchmen. It has nothing to do with the comic outside of some easter eggs and references. I'm not sure when this takes place in comparison to the source material. Is it right after the end of the book? Years later? I don't know. I'm still trying to find out how the police became the superheroes when they were outlawed and hunting them down in the comic.
It's set in 2019 or 2020. Don't worry if you've only seen the first two episodes cause it definitely ties into Watchmen comic
 

Curt Baboon

Avenger
Mar 13, 2018
130
So I just caught up and here's some errant thoughts/questions:

Is it just me or was episode 5 like really dull compared to the rest of them? Was I the only one that in the beginning thought that Christian dude campaigning at the amusement park was Laurie's lanky sex partner? They looked a lot alike. Also I'm finding in general Wade/Looking Glass has been the least interesting character.

So Keene/Cyclops/The Seventh Kavalry's plan is to kill Dr. Manhattan and thus...become Dr. Manhattan(s)? How would killing him make them become him? There doesn't seem to be any obvious correlation there but I read Watchmen 10 years ago and only read the Wikipedia synopsis of the original graphic novel to get a little refresher before watching this show, so maybe I'm forgetting some attribute of his superpowerdom which would lead to dead Dr. Manhattan (also how do they plan to kill him? With their silly mesmerism strobe light? How does that thing work for like literally everybody? How did Cyclops pull something like that off during World War 2?) = steal Dr. Manhattan's powers.

So are we supposed to accept that Angela has known her husband is secretly Dr. Manhattan all this time? Why was she surprised when Lady Trieu was like "Yo did you know Dr. Manhattan lives here!???? Don't you wanna know who he is??" Was the idea with that scene that she was pretending not to know? Why does she accept that her husband is Dr. Manhattan? This twist just seems so out of nowhere.

Why did Lady Trieu clone her mom, exactly? Did they explain that? I'm gonna guess the answer for this next question is nobody knows, but what is the deal with the Millenium Clock? Also does Lady Trieu seriously have like one employee that isn't her mom-daughter working at her business which is worth over a trillion dollars (I'm referring to that one woman with the hard hat)?

What is the deal with the elephant? Is that supposed to be an elephant in the room joke?

Clair de Lune in that moon scene...really guys?

Does Damon Lindelof only know like the most popular 'adult' pop-culture stuff to directly reference to make his show seem deeper than it is? (Things Fall Apart, Ozymandias, I Don't Want To Set the World On Fire, For Whom the Bell Tolls)

Okay so...Adrian Veidt is on Europa? How? I don't get this stuff at all to be honest. When the Game Warden yanks his back, he like warps back. So was he on that satellite? Where is this idyllic countryside supposed to be? Who is he trying to ask to save him? What is the deal with the fetuses in the river? Why is he making this play? Didn't he purposefully bow out of the public eye in the first place? So how did he end up imprisoned? Maybe my lack of deep familiarity with the source material around Watchmen is hindering me here because I honest to god do not understand what is going on here at all.

So we're in agreement the trap door was goofy as shit, right?

Why does Veidt want Redford in office? He's in whatever-prison so he has like no connection to Earth, so it's not like he can use Redford as a puppet.
Most of these questions are about things that are clearly not supposed to be known yet and/or are purposefully confusing. This would be like asking "But I don't get it who killed the girl though?!" after the third episode of True Detective.

I also don't get the dig at the references Lindelof has chosen to use. What's wrong about using any of those things you listed in the show? Those references are not there to make the show seem artificially deeper, the show IS deep because of how it uses those references in service of the actual story (among other things, of course).

And a few loose points:

- Veidt made that video for Redford WAY before he was somehow trapped in Europa. It was supposedly recorded hours before Ozymandias executed the Squid attack.
- Angela didn't act surprised at all when Lady Trieu dropped that Dr Manhattan bombshell on her. I don't understand why you question if we're supposed to accept that she knew about this beforehand when there have been a bunch of clues to back the twist up. It's definitely not out of nowhere.
- We don't know anything about the 7th Kavalry's actual plan other than they plan to destroy him and then become him, so again a lot of these questions are just things we will clearly find out more about in the next two episodes.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,441
Norman, OK
I've watched the first two episodes and I still don't know why this is called Watchmen. It has nothing to do with the comic outside of some easter eggs and references. I'm not sure when this takes place in comparison to the source material. Is it right after the end of the book? Years later? I don't know. I'm still trying to find out how the police became the superheroes when they were outlawed and hunting them down in the comic.
Did you actually watch the first two episodes, or just occasionally glance up at them while diddling with your phone? Every question you ask above is explicitly covered in the first episode. You might want to re-watch and pay full attention. Then watch at least thru episode 5 if you're looking for direct connections to the source material- as there are an ever growing amount of them as we move forward.
 

Wigdogger

Member
Oct 27, 2017
130
Did you actually watch the first two episodes, or just occasionally glance up at them while diddling with your phone? Every question you ask above is explicitly covered in the first episode. You might want to re-watch and pay full attention. Then watch at least thru episode 5 if you're looking for direct connections to the source material- as there are an ever growing amount of them as we move forward.

Ha, savage.
 

PogChamp

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
6,217
So I just caught up and here's some errant thoughts/questions:

Is it just me or was episode 5 like really dull compared to the rest of them? Was I the only one that in the beginning thought that Christian dude campaigning at the amusement park was Laurie's lanky sex partner? They looked a lot alike. Also I'm finding in general Wade/Looking Glass has been the least interesting character.
Just you, most people really enjoyed seeing the after effects and PTSD of the squid.

So Keene/Cyclops/The Seventh Kavalry's plan is to kill Dr. Manhattan and thus...become Dr. Manhattan(s)? How would killing him make them become him? There doesn't seem to be any obvious correlation there but I read Watchmen 10 years ago and only read the Wikipedia synopsis of the original graphic novel to get a little refresher before watching this show, so maybe I'm forgetting some attribute of his superpowerdom which would lead to dead Dr. Manhattan (also how do they plan to kill him? With their silly mesmerism strobe light? How does that thing work for like literally everybody? How did Cyclops pull something like that off during World War 2?) = steal Dr. Manhattan's powers.
We don't know yet.

So are we supposed to accept that Angela has known her husband is secretly Dr. Manhattan all this time? Why was she surprised when Lady Trieu was like "Yo did you know Dr. Manhattan lives here!???? Don't you wanna know who he is??" Was the idea with that scene that she was pretending not to know? Why does she accept that her husband is Dr. Manhattan? This twist just seems so out of nowhere.
We haven't seen how they met yet. She was surprised that Lady Trieu knew about Cal. The twist is somewhat out of nowhere, the foreshadowing was mostly in the form of little easter eggs and dialogue that takes on new light in hindsight.

Why did Lady Trieu clone her mom, exactly? Did they explain that? I'm gonna guess the answer for this next question is nobody knows, but what is the deal with the Millenium Clock? Also does Lady Trieu seriously have like one employee that isn't her mom-daughter working at her business which is worth over a trillion dollars (I'm referring to that one woman with the hard hat)?
She told you, she wants her parents present when she launches the clock. There aren't that many employees around because everyone evacuated in preparation for the clock.

What is the deal with the elephant? Is that supposed to be an elephant in the room joke?
Elephants never forget. They harvested the elephant's cranial fluid to wash away the Nostalgia in Angela's brain.

Clair de Lune in that moon scene...really guys?

Does Damon Lindelof only know like the most popular 'adult' pop-culture stuff to directly reference to make his show seem deeper than it is? (Things Fall Apart, Ozymandias, I Don't Want To Set the World On Fire, For Whom the Bell Tolls)
Things Fall Apart is about Okonkwo being banished from his tribe and living in exile. I'm sure there are parallels and symbolism behind the choices made.

Okay so...Adrian Veidt is on Europa? How? I don't get this stuff at all to be honest. When the Game Warden yanks his back, he like warps back. So was he on that satellite? Where is this idyllic countryside supposed to be? Who is he trying to ask to save him? What is the deal with the fetuses in the river? Why is he making this play? Didn't he purposefully bow out of the public eye in the first place? So how did he end up imprisoned? Maybe my lack of deep familiarity with the source material around Watchmen is hindering me here because I honest to god do not understand what is going on here at all.
No one has a clue yet. The closest we have is that Veidt has some connection to Lady Trieu and he may have been spelling "SAVE ME DAUGHTER" with the bodies. With everything being so ridiculously goofy I wouldn't be surprised if Veidt was simply imprisoned in his own mind and in some form of stasis as that statue.

So we're in agreement the trap door was goofy as shit, right?


Why does Veidt want Redford in office? He's in whatever-prison so he has like no connection to Earth, so it's not like he can use Redford as a puppet.
He wouldn't know that he would be imprisoned in the future at the time he was making that video.
 

Doomsayer

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
2,338
Most of the time the clips are so out of context and fast within 2 days of watching them I already completely forget what they show.

I get not wanting anything "spoiled" though.
 

Ignatz Mouse

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,933
It's literally just you. Wade is a standout character
Yeah, I love Wade. He's sorta the reformed ideal of Rorschach-- principled, a little nuts-- but y'know, not a right wing loon.

On another note--

In hindsight, when Angela wants to pick a fight with Cal, she spoils the ending of the book he's reading. Something that wouldn't normally work on Doctor Manhattan, but presumably he's somehow given up his precognitive abilities along with his memories.

Also, on the White Night, Angela says she's training him to like surprises.

Nice little touches.
 

Ignatz Mouse

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,933
I've watched the first two episodes and I still don't know why this is called Watchmen. It has nothing to do with the comic outside of some easter eggs and references. I'm not sure when this takes place in comparison to the source material. Is it right after the end of the book? Years later? I don't know. I'm still trying to find out how the police became the superheroes when they were outlawed and hunting them down in the comic.
It's a sequel, and it's set in 2019, when the events of the comic were in 1985. The connections get stronger over time, but it intentionally drops you in this altered world and lets you slowly start piecing it together, just as the comic did.
 

Disco

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,267
these previews always fuck me since i tend to watch Silicon Valley before Watchmen and my DVR recording starts with a "Next time on Watchmen" clip. so I saw
the blue back of the head of manhattan
before I quickly forwarded it lol

still that twist with Angela and Cal was pretty damn unexpected. Damn I love this show, hands down the most interesting superhero media in years. Also the idea of Doctor Manhattan living in the body of a minority and going through those experiences has a sort of "If God was one of us" vibe to it.
 

Yasuke

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,923
Yeah, this is me. I watched the trailer for this Sunday's episode immediately after this last episode and don't even remember what it showed.
I guarantee I wouldn’t have this problem.

Maybe my memory is just better at retaining this stuff than most though, I never get the “I forgot what that movie was about as soon as I left the theater” takes either.
 

Zero315

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,868
Yeah that's exactly like fighting a being that is basically god.
Silicon Valley continuously caters to white supremacists, Palmer fucking Luckey wants to help Trump build his wall and is working on facial recognition software to recognize "illegals" or something like that last I heard. It's not a very big stretch to say that the 7K/Cyclops has people who could figure out how to capture Dr. M considering how much tech there is to study that used his power.
 

Doomsayer

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
2,338
I guarantee I wouldn’t have this problem.

Maybe my memory is just better at retaining this stuff than most though, I never get the “I forgot what that movie was about as soon as I left the theater” takes either.
That's never happened to me, that's just strange.

I just think a bunch of 2-4 second clips with virtually 0 dialogue and context aren't exactly memorable.
 

Disco

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,267
Looking Glass episode reminded me of one of the Matt-led episodes in Leftovers. He's just such a sad character practically debilitated by his paranoia.
 

andrew

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,191
idk what the thing in the credits is this coming week but I'll definitely see it. I don't mind seeing the previews for most shows, and especially this one they don't really show anything.

calling the trap door goofy as a criticism seems silly to me because they literally call it goofy in the show lol. Like Laurie says are you serious, a trap door? and it being such a dumb thing is why it gets her