What's one major technological advancement you've experienced that you're really grateful for?

Oct 28, 2017
5,357
#1
Anyone remember burning CDs?



Fuck that. It took forever, the CD player was clunky as hell, and it barely held any music. Maybe 18 tracks or so.



Having infinite music available on a smartphone is paradise by comparison. Spotify, Bandcamp, Apple Music, or even just pulling up Youtube will do the trick. And speaking of Youtube, its algorithms have allowed me to find countless amounts of new music that I love.

Smartphones and their apps are my answer.
 
Oct 25, 2017
7,588
#3
I still have a lot of cds that I don’t want but that I don’t want to throw away either. I have no idea what to do.

Anyways, the iPod is my pick.
 
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Oct 25, 2017
1,236
#4
Given how much i suck in math: That i always carry around a calculator with me.

In all seriousness, its impressive how far computers got and how tiny they became. Given how huge hearing aids used to be im really grateful for that.

Given that digital hearing aids are still pretty new (1995) that‘s a frigging fast development going on there. Around the 80s you still had to wear a hearing aid backpack thing, now everything fits into a tiny device behind your ear or even in your ear.
 
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Oct 31, 2017
1,674
#6
CPAP machines - I suffer from severe sleep apnea, the condition destroys everything from the brain to liver and heart. Needless to say, my life has improved 110% ever since I started using CPAP therapy.
 
Oct 25, 2017
7,588
#12
I was under the assumption that this would be about consumer products, not fucking science and the internet. Fun stuff.
Those are cheap copouts.
 

ryseing

Bought courtside tickets just to read a book.
Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,826
North Carolina
#14
Maps on my phone.

I have no sense of direction. Zero. Google Maps came along just as I started driving, and I would be a lost soul without them.

^ Ah, beat me to it as I was typing.
 

weemadarthur

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,062
#15
Since indoor plumbing was taken....
Ereaders. I used to run out of books if I traveled, and you can only carry so many in a suitcase. Now I can have LOTS of books at all times.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,982
#17
I still have a lot of cds that I don’t want but that I don’t want to throw away either. I have no idea what to do.
Yuuup. Same. I even have a few re-writable dvds, too. I remember going from floppy disks to cds and thinking cds were a downgrade for storage.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,894
#21
The Internet as a whole aside, it's easily digital music.

Every single day I'm aware of how fucking amazing it is that I have all the world's music at the touch of a screen.
 
Jan 8, 2018
1,302
earth
#22
"The internet" is too easy an answer, but I guess it's impossible to avoid. Getting more specific I guess I'd say GPS and real-time maps (aka Google Maps). It's hard to imagine being without it now. It's kinda fucking magic when you think about it. People who started driving and "getting around" on their own after the advent of smartphones just have no idea.
 
Oct 27, 2017
3,741
#23
Imagine learning to change film reels blindly in a dark canvas bag, then (after a crazy process of developing the film) edit it by hooking the reels up to a big machine, scroll through it, cut the film and physically tape the ends together to make edits.

And to really give a sense of just how quickly things changed, I learned that in the year two fucking thousand.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,142
#24
Two things:

1. Allergy Medication.
Without this, I would literally not be able to survive the world as the allergies I have are literally unavoidable.

2. Modern toilet facilities.
I'm technically cheating here because I'm not only going to include internal plumbing (and thus not needing to go in a hole outside) but also modern toilet paper, which I would hope is clear in itself why, especially because when the quality of it started advancing people started using the term "splinter free!" as an advertisement.
 
Oct 31, 2017
809
#26
since i use this everyday, i would say the wacom tablet.

before i had one my wrist would hurt from editing photos. now i can get precision and no soreness!

 
Dec 11, 2017
1,026
#29
GPS

I'd be afraid to travel anywhere new without them. Thankfully they became affordable right when I started to drive. Having to get directions from people sucked.
 
Oct 29, 2017
1,554
#31
"The internet" is too easy an answer, but I guess it's impossible to avoid. Getting more specific I guess I'd say GPS and real-time maps (aka Google Maps). It's hard to imagine being without it now. It's kinda fucking magic when you think about it. People who started driving and "getting around" on their own after the advent of smartphones just have no idea.
I'm 27 and I remember the transition from real maps that were updated every year, to printing out map quest directions and following them to the letter, to shitty Garmin car GPS', to gmaps.

Real time GPS with our handheld super computers, shit's unreal.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,089
Singapore
#32
It has to be the internet really lol. Other than that.., smartphone, broadband (unlimited one :p ), non sms messaging and video calls, increase in HDD capacity and SSD maybe.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,829
Fiddler's Green
#33
The expansion of vaccination. The MMR vaccine came out when I was 1. Just before I was born, the rubella vaccine came out, capping off America's last great epidemic, the rubella epidemic of 1965, just five years before my birth. Vaccines went from a rarity to something every child had during the seventies, and because of that, two generations of Americans haven't had to worry about the scourge of childhood illnesses. There are tens of thousands of children not dead and millions not scarred, deafened, and damaged by these diseases because of widespread vaccination.
 
Oct 28, 2017
998
#34
The expansion of vaccination. The MMR vaccine came out when I was 1. Just before I was born, the rubella vaccine came out, capping off America's last great epidemic, the rubella epidemic of 1965, just five years before my birth. Vaccines went from a rarity to something every child had during the seventies, and because of that, two generations of Americans haven't had to worry about the scourge of childhood illnesses. There are tens of thousands of children not dead and millions not scarred, deafened, and damaged by these diseases because of widespread vaccination.
This, it was amazing leap forward.
 
Oct 27, 2017
22
#37
I agree with smart phones. It's crazy when I think about it. Real time GPS maps replacing physical maps, spotify replacing my CD collection, audible slowly replacing my books on CD, having all my contacts phone numbers at a click of a button rather flipping through an address book, having access to hundreds of TV shows and movies...it's pretty nuts. All in this tiny little device.
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,204
#42
Everything that allowed on demand, trivial video conferencing so I can catch a quick session with a physician for things that don't really require a full blown in-person appointment. At, say, 3PM I can fire up my healthcare app, talk to my doctor, and get a renewal on a prescription. No need for us to go out of our way to block off time and meet at an office. Just hey doc, still not sleeping well, here's the x y z. Ok, sent your approval to the drug store down the street - go get your Ambien.

This extends to work too. No reason for 20 people to drive to some place just to discuss something for 30 minutes.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,497
#44
The chickenpox vaccine wasn't available in the US until I was almost a teenager. When I was growing up, the way to get immunity was to just get the disease as young as possible because it would become more and more dangerous the later you get it. It felt so great when I finally got vaccinated and knew that I most likely won't ever have to deal with the disease itself.
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,416
#45
Personally experienced? I mean I'm pretty happy for modern computing, smartphones, internet which enabled advances in every industry.

If I had to pick one for fun it would be GPS because I rely on that heavily every time I go somewhere new lol
 
Oct 25, 2017
30,595
#46
Anyone remember burning CDs?



Fuck that. It took forever, the CD player was clunky as hell, and it barely held any music. Maybe 18 tracks or so.



Having infinite music available on a smartphone is paradise by comparison. Spotify, Bandcamp, Apple Music, or even just pulling up Youtube will do the trick. And speaking of Youtube, its algorithms have allowed me to find countless amounts of new music that I love.

Smartphones and their apps are my answer.

I miss burning mix cds and the weird song associations that got formed permanently in my head as a result
 
Jun 13, 2018
46
#49
Internet in general.
The possibility of making computing technology to be in your bare hands and bring with you anywhere (Yes, I'm still amaze that the Laptops and the Smartphone exist, leave me alone!)
Hear your music anywhere, at anytime without bringing with you other more your phone and headphones.
 
Feb 8, 2018
293
#50
Toilet and waste disposal system. It's something you never think about once you flush, but after watching this video on "How Tourists Turned Mount Everest into a Dump" it made me appreciate our waste disposal system even more.
Considering what I just had done:

Lasik
How much did it cost for Lasik?
 
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