When is piracy morally acceptable?

When is Piracy morally acceptable?

  • When the creator(s) is/are dead

    Votes: 8 24.2%
  • When the creators are no longer benefitting from the sale of the product

    Votes: 14 42.4%
  • If you have no way to legally access the product (due to limited release or other reasons)

    Votes: 29 87.9%
  • If you live in a 3rd world country and there's no regional pricing

    Votes: 17 51.5%
  • If the product has already made a LOT of money and the creator is now financially sorted

    Votes: 7 21.2%
  • If you're not in a financial position to be able to pay for the product

    Votes: 7 21.2%
  • Never

    Votes: 5 15.2%

  • Total voters
    33
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snowhite

You fuckers are beautiful.
Member
Aug 7, 2018
715
Yes, this thread is inspired by the one where OP mentioned his colleague pirating DQ11. No, this isn't a parody thread.

As a kid growing up in suburban India, piracy was the way of life for me and all of my friends. The Windows license was too expensive, so all our PCs (even ones at school) had pirated Windows copies (along with a bunch of complimentary software like Photoshop that the computer shop would install on your PC when you purchased one). My parents (like most asian parents) frowned heavily on gaming as an activity (still do), so buying games was out of the question. Same thing for movies and TV shows. Besides, there was no regional pricing, so everything was prohibitively expensive.

As an adult, thanks to regional pricing, I do pay for games and OTP services, but my thoughts about piracy are very different to those of first world folks. I think the whole point of copyright is to make sure that the creator of a work gets enough money to be able to live a comfortable life and keep creating. As such, I believe the morality of piracy depends on surrounding circumstances.

Hence the poll, to find out what Era thinks. You can choose more than one option.

I'll leave you with a quote from musician Jeff Tweedy-

"A piece of art is not a loaf of bread. When someone steals a loaf of bread from the store, that's it. The loaf of bread is gone. When someone downloads a piece of music, it's just data until the listener puts that music back together with their own ears, their mind, their subjective experience. How they perceive your work changes your work.

Treating your audience like thieves is absurd. Anyone who chooses to listen to our music becomes a collaborator."
 

MartinB105

Member
Nov 8, 2017
2,470
I want to give my answer (which isn't listed in your poll), but isn't "justifying piracy" a bannable offence here? I'm kind of expecting this topic to get closed.
 

crepuscule

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,274
Imo, after 10 years in all cases, and otherwise if you can't afford it and so wouldn't have bought it otherwise.

I don't think "intellectual property" should be a thing but I do think people should be able to make money from creative work and so a ten year copyright helps ensure that and thus incentivises more creative works while also allowing new creators to use their ideas before the new people's deaths.
 

Platy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
17,031
Brazil
When the creators are no longer benefitting from the sale of the product
If you have no way to legally access the product (due to limited release or other reasons)

These are the ones I feel are pretty black and white morally ok

"3rd world without regional pricing" and "not financially be able to pay for it" are grey areas, since it is hard to say what trully is fair pricing and games are inherently useless stuff, so "don't have money for this now" is entirely subjective don't matter how rich you are
 

ghostcrew

Grabbed by the Ghosties
Moderator
Oct 27, 2017
11,418
Our rules regarding discussion of and justification of piracy make this an impossible thread to host.
 
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