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Will "regardless" die in our lifetimes?

Oct 25, 2017
2,084
#1
So I was watching this video from Nerdsync on the use "whelmed' in Young Justice. Having never bothered to look up the word ever, and being the idiot I am, I legitimately thought it was just a neutral state.

So with "irregardless" being so commonly used, I wonder if it will supplant "regardless" in the next 50 - 70 years.

I hope it doesn't, I like "regardless".
 

Static

Loki
Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,665
#12
The use of double negative "for clarity" is bizarre. Double negatives make things more ambiguous, not less. Some redundancies make sense as intensifiers. Irregardless is a grammatical invention that does the exact opposite of "providing a deeper level of power and clarity." When I first heard it I was genuinely confused by it. Regardless, I got over it. Use whichever word you like. I could care less.
The real scourge that nobody’s paying attention to are blockheads who say “worse” instead of “worst” and “bias” instead of “biased”
It's past time you should of learned to live with these sorts of things.
 
Oct 25, 2017
5,358
#15
Nothing stops the flow of time and English language will evolve and adapt as words fall out of favours, get invented or supplanted.

I mean take the word Gay, it's more commonly associated with to refer a person who is attracted to the same gender than the old mean of "light-hearted and carefree."

Or the fact that words like selfie only recently existed.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,013
Nova Scotia
#16
OP, you’re being very chalant.

Jokes aside, I get a little tired of the language-is-fluid argument. It is true but I find it’s usually invoked to excuse laziness or quirks in language. It behooves you to speak accurately. I like a dumb throw-away joke as much as anyone but in the end, if you can convey your thoughts succinctly, everyone wins.
 
Oct 28, 2017
604
#18
The use of double negative "for clarity" is bizarre. Double negatives make things more ambiguous, not less. Some redundancies make sense as intensifiers. Irregardless is a grammatical invention that does the exact opposite of "providing a deeper level of power and clarity." When I first heard it I was genuinely confused by it. Regardless, I got over it. Use whichever word you like. I could care less.

It's past time you should of learned to live with these sorts of things.
reported
 
Oct 25, 2017
7,742
Edmonton
#19
I just listened to an Eminem song where he uses “could care less” and “irregardless” both in the same song. Couldn’t even get through the rest of the song.
 
Oct 27, 2017
967
#20
If the word "literally" can become its own antonym, then by god, irregardless will eventually be the correct word.

Also, "could" may also become its own antonym because "I could care less."

I just listened to an Eminem song where he uses “could care less” and “irregardless” both in the same song. Couldn’t even get through the rest of the song.
NM. Stealth edit. You got it.
 
Dec 18, 2017
190
#21
Irregardless of what anyone itt thinks, ‘I could care less’ makes as much sense as ‘I couldn’t care less,’ but that’s a mute point.
 
May 20, 2018
4,518
Ponds
#26
No, the real crime are people who keep mixing up ‘loose’ when they meant to say ‘lose’. I see it at least once-a-day and it drives me insane. This isn’t like ‘effect’ versus ‘affect’ which I would sympathize with since I constantly mix them up. This though, it’s not hard people, come on.
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,499
#28
So I was watching this video from Nerdsync on the use "whelmed' in Young Justice. Having never bothered to look up the word ever, and being the idiot I am, I legitimately thought it was just a neutral state.

So with "irregardless" being so commonly used, I wonder if it will supplant "regardless" in the next 50 - 70 years.

I hope it doesn't, I like "regardless".
Is there evidence that its usage is growing?
"Irregardless" It's a pretty old ass word and if anything, its of an old-timey style of double negative that has generally fell out favor in English.

Anyway, I seriously doubt that "regardless" is going away any time soon.
 
Oct 27, 2017
7,637
Sunderland
#29
So I was watching this video from Nerdsync on the use "whelmed' in Young Justice. Having never bothered to look up the word ever, and being the idiot I am, I legitimately thought it was just a neutral state.

So with "irregardless" being so commonly used, I wonder if it will supplant "regardless" in the next 50 - 70 years.

I hope it doesn't, I like "regardless".
I'm not aware that anybody outside North America says irregardless.

Or thusly.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,288
#32
I've never heard anyone IRL say irregardless.

I'm getting fucking tired of people who mix up their apostrophes.

"Who's car is it?"
"Its a Lamborghini"
"I heard it's steering wheel feels great"-
"Their is a car on the road"
"Your sure?"

Just fucking kill me.
 
Oct 25, 2017
429
#39
So I'd really like, like "our" to be used and pronounced properly. Peoples say "are" like there pirates, even going as far as too spell it wrongly to!
 
Oct 27, 2017
522
#40
I said irregardless in a presentation once and all my team members corrected me afterwards. At first I was like, "is it really such a big deal, you all knew what I meant" But ever since then I've been consious of it and use regardless instead.
 

papermoon

The Fallen
Oct 27, 2017
815
#42
even going as far as too spell it wrongly to!
hmmm

i know i know

edit:
but it should be "wrong" instead of "wrongly" since the adverb wrong/wrongly is placed after the verb (as opposed to before it). Making the correction in the spirit of the thread. Don't really care about internet typos. I make them more often than not.
 
Last edited:
Oct 28, 2017
378
#47
I wondered if Young Justice was making a reference to 10 Things I About You.. the person who uploaded this had the same idea

Note: I did not watch the entrity of that guys video

 
Oct 25, 2017
429
#49
hmmm

i know i know

edit:
but it should be "wrong" instead of "wrongly" since the adverb wrong/wrongly is placed after the verb (as opposed to before it). Making the correction in the spirit of the thread. Don't really care about internet typos. I make them more often than not.
All accordingly too plan, my freind ;)