• Introducing Image Options for ResetEra 2.0! Check the left side navigation bar to show or hide images, avatars, covers, and embedded media. More details at the link.

WSJ: Nintendo to Launch Two New Switch Models. Premium "Enhanced" Model and Cheaper Portable Model.

What are you most excited for?

  • The more powerful model

    Votes: 3,427 68.0%
  • The more handheld model

    Votes: 430 8.5%
  • Both!

    Votes: 592 11.7%
  • Neither.

    Votes: 590 11.7%

  • Total voters
    5,039
Oct 28, 2017
4,010
A charging solution already exists.

Controllers can update wirelessly.

There are no problems here. You buy the base Switch if you want all the home console stuff out of the box. You buy the mini if you want a handheld unit/second unit at a lower cost; you can buy the other stuff separately if you want it, or use your accessories from another Switch.
I didn't know Joycon can update wirelessly.

Yes a charging solution exists for $30 on top of $70 for a set of Joycon which means $100 just for a set of controllers even before you add the cost of a dock if you want to also play on the TV. So unless the Switch Lite will cost ~$160 less than the original Switch (which it probably won't be, or at least would take the removal of more functionality than the dock and joycons to reach that price), there isn't going to be a reasonably priced upgrade path for people who want the functionality added back to the system in piecemeal fashion. In fact, the minimum you'd have to spend just to be able to play on the TV (since you can't use your built in controls in TV mode) are $60 for a dock and $60 for a Pro Controller or $30 for a charging grip, $40 for half of a joycon set, and $60 for a dock, which means you are either spending $120 or $130 for a worst set up. That's what I mean, you are paying more for half of a joycon set when a pair will cost more but you are also getting way more versatility and functionality by buying both instead of half to save a little extra money. What costs Nintendo cents-a few dollars to add some of these parts and functions to a system will cost the end user way more to buy them after the fact.

I don't know how you can justify a premium cost for the basic functionality of the base system.

I get that such a feature-dense system will have to make some tough cuts to get the price down a substantial amount, but you make superficial cuts before you cut basic functionality. Even that fact that they are still doing to make it so it can play on the TV, and all the design that would entail keeping just to make it possible, that means that not only does Nintendo believe that ability is important to the philosophy of the system, but they also believe it's important to the consumers, beyond a handful of people willing to pay a $120-$160 premium just to play their portable system like an OG Switch.
 
Oct 28, 2017
4,010
I don't see any reason to remove the cartridge slot for the Switch Mini, especially when said model is gonna be aimed at kids.
Nintendo could always add some type of "family share" functionality, making it easier for kids to share games, even potentially making sharing a digital game for local multiplayer possible in a way that a physical game just can't do. Physical games are also easier to lose and trickier to carry around all of them with you.

Tablet and mobile games don't use carts and kids handle it just fine, but it would take Nintendo to take some big steps forward with their digital policies to really be as easy as sharing a game with a friend or family member. Currently, sharing digital games on the Switch is pretty good, allowing people to share full libraries, with some limitations to playing the same game at the same time, but if Nintendo is able to make it even easier to share games across multiple consoles with people still having their own profiles and saves, it could be huge for families and preferable to physical games.

Of course, that would be a big IF, since that would require Nintendo to make other changes in tandem with an all-digital console to make it viable and not a dud like the PSP Go, but it's possible. It could mean that Nintendo would be more willing to bundle a couple games with it.

Plus with the way that physical cart costs are going these days and how many developers are opting for a mandatory download to play a game anyways, it's almost arguable that saving the cost on a cart reader and putting it towards more built-in memory is a better use of that money.
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,264
Peru
I hope that the Lite model also has a kickstand despite of probably lacking the multiplayer functions of the OG Switch. The kickstand is really underrated since it allows for a really confortable way to watch cutscenes in handheld mode and is especially good for visual novels where there's minimum gameplay. A more resistant version would be great.
 
Oct 25, 2017
185
It's probably safer to assume they ordered 4M, so ~8000 waffers still it's 70% to 80% they are definitely being pushed off the node.
Well there are quite a few factors in there which could be out by a factor of 2 or more (most notably the cost of 20nm wafers relative to average), so it’s a really rough estimate all around. In fact, if you were to take conservative estimates of how many 20nm wafers TSMC are producing (so 0.7% revenue rounded up to 1%, and 20nm wafers costing 4x the average wafer), you’d get less than 4000 wafers per quarter, which wouldn’t even cover Nintendo’s requirements, so it’s possible that TX1 has already stopped production, and Nintendo are clearing out any remaining stock before introducing new models in a few months time.
 
Dec 5, 2017
1,934
What if the Switch mini/light ends up being digital only with more than 32gb of storage, better WiFi and longer battery life? Indies sell extremely good and better battery life means longer play time away from the TV/home. Could it be different enough for people to buy it? I have no idea if it would justify and price tag of 200-250 though. Just a blitz idea of mine.
No chance, huge majority of sold Switch games are still physically not digital, also its not like card slot take much space or costs,
so there is no point for only digital Switch.
 
Dec 5, 2017
1,934
2019
Switch Pocket - 200$
Switch - 300$

2020
Switch Pocket - 150/175$
Switch - 250$
Switch Pro - 300/350$
I actually see something like this:

2019
Switch Pocket - 200$
Switch (bundled with game) - 300$

2020
Switch Pocket - 150-180$
Switch (bundled with game) only until there are stock available and until it's completely replaced buy New Switch - 250$
New Switch - 250-300$
 
Oct 26, 2017
2,559
Nintendo could always add some type of "family share" functionality, making it easier for kids to share games, even potentially making sharing a digital game for local multiplayer possible in a way that a physical game just can't do. Physical games are also easier to lose and trickier to carry around all of them with you.

Tablet and mobile games don't use carts and kids handle it just fine, but it would take Nintendo to take some big steps forward with their digital policies to really be as easy as sharing a game with a friend or family member. Currently, sharing digital games on the Switch is pretty good, allowing people to share full libraries, with some limitations to playing the same game at the same time, but if Nintendo is able to make it even easier to share games across multiple consoles with people still having their own profiles and saves, it could be huge for families and preferable to physical games.

Of course, that would be a big IF, since that would require Nintendo to make other changes in tandem with an all-digital console to make it viable and not a dud like the PSP Go, but it's possible. It could mean that Nintendo would be more willing to bundle a couple games with it.

Plus with the way that physical cart costs are going these days and how many developers are opting for a mandatory download to play a game anyways, it's almost arguable that saving the cost on a cart reader and putting it towards more built-in memory is a better use of that money.
Kids don’t buy 20/30/40/50 dollar/euro games on tablets and phones. They play F2P games and eventually engage on micro-transactions. That’s not the business model of consoles, especially Nintendo’s. So limiting the avenues for software purchase would hurt Nintendo’s bottom line for no reason. A cart reader isn’t expensive in cost nor in real estate it takes.
 
Oct 25, 2017
16,896
Nintendo could always add some type of "family share" functionality, making it easier for kids to share games, even potentially making sharing a digital game for local multiplayer possible in a way that a physical game just can't do. Physical games are also easier to lose and trickier to carry around all of them with you.

Tablet and mobile games don't use carts and kids handle it just fine, but it would take Nintendo to take some big steps forward with their digital policies to really be as easy as sharing a game with a friend or family member. Currently, sharing digital games on the Switch is pretty good, allowing people to share full libraries, with some limitations to playing the same game at the same time, but if Nintendo is able to make it even easier to share games across multiple consoles with people still having their own profiles and saves, it could be huge for families and preferable to physical games.

Of course, that would be a big IF, since that would require Nintendo to make other changes in tandem with an all-digital console to make it viable and not a dud like the PSP Go, but it's possible. It could mean that Nintendo would be more willing to bundle a couple games with it.

Plus with the way that physical cart costs are going these days and how many developers are opting for a mandatory download to play a game anyways, it's almost arguable that saving the cost on a cart reader and putting it towards more built-in memory is a better use of that money.
the comparison to mobile breaks down when you add the fact that the majority of stuff kids play on those systems are free. of course they'll handle it fine when they don't have to beg for their parents credit card, nor have to do chores to get money for cash cards.
 
Nov 7, 2017
1,361
I didn't know Joycon can update wirelessly.

Yes a charging solution exists for $30 on top of $70 for a set of Joycon which means $100 just for a set of controllers even before you add the cost of a dock if you want to also play on the TV. So unless the Switch Lite will cost ~$160 less than the original Switch (which it probably won't be, or at least would take the removal of more functionality than the dock and joycons to reach that price), there isn't going to be a reasonably priced upgrade path for people who want the functionality added back to the system in piecemeal fashion. In fact, the minimum you'd have to spend just to be able to play on the TV (since you can't use your built in controls in TV mode) are $60 for a dock and $60 for a Pro Controller or $30 for a charging grip, $40 for half of a joycon set, and $60 for a dock, which means you are either spending $120 or $130 for a worst set up. That's what I mean, you are paying more for half of a joycon set when a pair will cost more but you are also getting way more versatility and functionality by buying both instead of half to save a little extra money. What costs Nintendo cents-a few dollars to add some of these parts and functions to a system will cost the end user way more to buy them after the fact.

I don't know how you can justify a premium cost for the basic functionality of the base system.

I get that such a feature-dense system will have to make some tough cuts to get the price down a substantial amount, but you make superficial cuts before you cut basic functionality. Even that fact that they are still doing to make it so it can play on the TV, and all the design that would entail keeping just to make it possible, that means that not only does Nintendo believe that ability is important to the philosophy of the system, but they also believe it's important to the consumers, beyond a handful of people willing to pay a $120-$160 premium just to play their portable system like an OG Switch.
Agree, they won't make people pay 150 euros for basic functionalities.
 
Oct 28, 2017
4,010
I'd be willing to wager that a bulk of the library of games on Switch is download only and costs under $20. I know I've picked up many games for a dollar or two on sale and the average price I've paid for a game on the Switch for how many games I own is probably on the lower end of the scale. Outside of first party games, the number of $30-60 retail games I own is a small part of my collection.

There are free to play games on the Switch right now and I've put over 700 hours into one of them, Fortnite, easily my most played game on the system.
 
Oct 26, 2017
589
A cheap console needs cheap games and digital are usually more expensive, at least with Nintendo.
Nintendo doesn’t sell their games cheap and people still buy them. They’ve held firm on pricing and I don’t think it’s hurt them. Nintendo feels their games are of high quality and consumers have agreed that the price they ask reflects that polish.

Their pricing won’t really change.
 
Nov 7, 2017
1,361
Nintendo doesn’t sell their games cheap and people still buy them. They’ve held firm on pricing and I don’t think it’s hurt them. Nintendo feels their games are of high quality and consumers have agreed that the price they ask reflects that polish.

Their pricing won’t really change.
I'm gonna talk about my country. 3DS games were usually 35 euros at launch, max 40, Switch games are 45-50, while digital games are 59. There's a huge difference.