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You know how sometimes when you take off clothes there's static and you can see it

Oct 27, 2017
544
#1
Like, it's in the dark and it's woolley clothes and you can see it like a flash of lightning when you take the shirt off.

After that shit happen I always kinda pause and think "that's way cool".

What other dumb normal shit in life that randomly happens gives you pause like that?
 
Oct 26, 2017
817
Northern VA
#6
when you're recovering from bronchitis and can feel a big plug of mucus that you've been working on getting out and then you manage to spit it out one day

feels good
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,539
#8
Sometimes when I'm playing video games, I think about how it's basically like playing with glorified electricity. Of course that's true of other electronics too, but video games is the only one that gives me pause, because just the act of playing with fancy electricity is weird.
 
Nov 17, 2017
4,661
#14
I had a metal bed frame as a kid. At night when I was going to bed I would intentionally rub my hand on my clothes/sheets and touch the bed post to cause a spark. Thought I was Static from Static Shock.
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,768
Sunderland
#16
Walking out at night, lying underneath the stars on a clear night, and realising that only the twisting of space-time prevents me from being hurled forever into this infinitely immense star-studded unending night.

But on the other hand, gravity keeps me stuck here with annoyances like gas bills and whatnot.
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,768
Sunderland
#22
I like when I turn and look at the door before someone knocks.
Reminds me of something my wife used to say. We'd be approaching a bus stop along a road about 60 metres long that was exactly perpendicular to the bus stop. She'd take maybe a minute to cover the ground, longer if there was traffic going on the road between us and the bus stop. And buses came at intervals of five minutes or less, because London. So for her the frequency of buses in London actually contributed to her anxiety. She used to say that she felt that she was always too late for the bus.

Now we have moved out of London, but we are in a very nice metropolitan area of the English northeast. We live very close to a bus stop but you can't see the stop until you're very close to it. The buses only come every ten minutes, but she's fine with that. She's waiting longer for every bus, on average, but unless a bus happens to sail past us on our very short journey up the street to the bus stop (which is very rare) she doesn't feel bad.

They say a watched kettle never boils. I think there's an element of cognition that is quite closely bound to experience. So if you often find yourself walking down the street and notice a bus stopped there, you'll tend to get the idea that the universe is malevolent and that it loves to dangle your prize just out of reach. But if you know a bus will come anyway and you don't ever see a bus you can't board, you don't get anxious and don't feel so paranoid.

I hope that makes sense. I think it's tangentially related to your idea of watched doors. Perhaps you look at doors a lot but you don't find significance unless somebody comes to the door.
 

Joe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,421
#23
I love when I close my eyes really tight I get flashes of light in the darkness and that rumbly/static noise in my ears. Never gets old.
You...might have a concussion
Doesn't it happen to you? I thought this was normal.
Not everyone can do that thing where they make their ears rumble. It's one of those muscles not everyone can control. Some sort of timpanic something or other.

It's like a mini super power. I always thought everyone could do it, too. Just block out sounds with ear rumbling. Apparently not!
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,419
Edmonton
#24
Not everyone can do that thing where they make their ears rumble. It's one of those muscles not everyone can control. Some sort of timpanic something or other.

It's like a mini super power. I always thought everyone could do it, too. Just block out sounds with ear rumbling. Apparently not!
Tensor tympani, I think. Until last year I always thought everyone could do it too, then I realized my wife and none of my kids could replicate the noise themselves.
 
Oct 30, 2017
5,133
#25
Not everyone can do that thing where they make their ears rumble. It's one of those muscles not everyone can control. Some sort of timpanic something or other.

It's like a mini super power. I always thought everyone could do it, too. Just block out sounds with ear rumbling. Apparently not!
Yeah I can do that, It never occurred to me that other people couldn't.
 

Joe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,421
#29
How about that thing where, when you turn your head to look at an old, clicking analog clock, the second hand always seems to hesitate where it is for a bit longer than a second? Used to always freak me out before I read it was a common, easily explained thing.
 
Oct 30, 2017
3,057
#30
I make black metal music as a hobby and the moment I learned to scream using my diaphragm gave me pause.

Also, stinky toe. I peel my big toenail off and fuuuuu why does it smell so bad
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,768
Sunderland
#31
How about that thing where, when you turn your head to look at an old, clicking analog clock, the second hand always seems to hesitate where it is for a bit longer than a second? Used to always freak me out before I read it was a common, easily explained thing.
Yeah! I love this. We have brains that are sophisticated enough to create instruments that can see the light from objects that existed over ten billion years ago, but they are also trivially falsified by the simple act of looking away from a second hand and then looking back.

We are all dirty computers, and that's something to be proud of.

 
Oct 30, 2017
5,133
#33
Reminds me of something my wife used to say. We'd be approaching a bus stop along a road about 60 metres long that was exactly perpendicular to the bus stop. She'd take maybe a minute to cover the ground, longer if there was traffic going on the road between us and the bus stop. And buses came at intervals of five minutes or less, because London. So for her the frequency of buses in London actually contributed to her anxiety. She used to say that she felt that she was always too late for the bus.

Now we have moved out of London, but we are in a very nice metropolitan area of the English northeast. We live very close to a bus stop but you can't see the stop until you're very close to it. The buses only come every ten minutes, but she's fine with that. She's waiting longer for every bus, on average, but unless a bus happens to sail past us on our very short journey up the street to the bus stop (which is very rare) she doesn't feel bad.

They say a watched kettle never boils. I think there's an element of cognition that is quite closely bound to experience. So if you often find yourself walking down the street and notice a bus stopped there, you'll tend to get the idea that the universe is malevolent and that it loves to dangle your prize just out of reach. But if you know a bus will come anyway and you don't ever see a bus you can't board, you don't get anxious and don't feel so paranoid.

I hope that makes sense. I think it's tangentially related to your idea of watched doors. Perhaps you look at doors a lot but you don't find significance unless somebody comes to the door.
Yeah it makes sense. Maybe I am just predisposed to looking at doors.
 

eot

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,402
#34
When you stick your head in a weak neutron beam and see blue flashes of Cherenkov radiation in your eyes
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,558
Virginia
#40
That time I managed to sustain a light orgasm for like 20-30 seconds like 11 years ago. Never been able to replicate it since.

Does anyone know what I may have experienced/how I can do it again? I haven't been able to find any useful info.
 
Aug 22, 2018
1,323
#42
Reminds me of something my wife used to say. We'd be approaching a bus stop along a road about 60 metres long that was exactly perpendicular to the bus stop. She'd take maybe a minute to cover the ground, longer if there was traffic going on the road between us and the bus stop. And buses came at intervals of five minutes or less, because London. So for her the frequency of buses in London actually contributed to her anxiety. She used to say that she felt that she was always too late for the bus.

Now we have moved out of London, but we are in a very nice metropolitan area of the English northeast. We live very close to a bus stop but you can't see the stop until you're very close to it. The buses only come every ten minutes, but she's fine with that. She's waiting longer for every bus, on average, but unless a bus happens to sail past us on our very short journey up the street to the bus stop (which is very rare) she doesn't feel bad.

They say a watched kettle never boils. I think there's an element of cognition that is quite closely bound to experience. So if you often find yourself walking down the street and notice a bus stopped there, you'll tend to get the idea that the universe is malevolent and that it loves to dangle your prize just out of reach. But if you know a bus will come anyway and you don't ever see a bus you can't board, you don't get anxious and don't feel so paranoid.

I hope that makes sense. I think it's tangentially related to your idea of watched doors. Perhaps you look at doors a lot but you don't find significance unless somebody comes to the door.
This kind of reminds me of an experiment I saw one time. There was a major airport (I don't remember which one) that was trying to cut down on complaints from customers who were arriving and had to wait on their luggage on the carousal thing.

[I'm going to use approx numbers I remember, not the exact specific ones, but the point remains.]

So, average wait times were something like 11 minutes. They then changed the airport up so all departures were in the furthest terminals, and all arrivals were in the closest ones. People ending up having to walk from their plane to the carousal for about 2 minutes, then wait 7 minutes for luggage. Complaints went up, even though total deboard-to-luggage came down from 11 minutes to 9 minutes.

Then, they reversed it. Now, people arriving had to walk for like 9 minutes and wait 4 minutes for luggage. Complaints immediately dropped off, even though total deboard-to-luggage time had gone from 9 minutes to 13 minutes.
 
Oct 28, 2017
10,752
#43
That time I managed to sustain a light orgasm for like 20-30 seconds like 11 years ago. Never been able to replicate it since.
If you orgasm for 20 seconds, light or heavy, you'll blow a fuse and never be able to again.

I’ve never seen that in my life. Time to try to find it on YouTube.
Get your skin super dry and take off a sweater in the dark. I hate winter because it's so dry. Life is uncomfortable.
 

Hey

Member
Feb 19, 2018
1,217
#47
Walking out at night, lying underneath the stars on a clear night, and realising that only the twisting of space-time prevents me from being hurled forever into this infinitely immense star-studded unending night.

But on the other hand, gravity keeps me stuck here with annoyances like gas bills and whatnot.
You can solve that problem.

just be rich!
 
Oct 26, 2017
56
#48
When the tap water drops at a frequency that makes it look like it's going back in the tap or standing still.

Though it has always been so that I notice it after the fact and not while it's still happening.