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"You told me to..." Body-Cam Footage Released of the Shooting of Danquirs Franklin by a CMPD Officer

May 31, 2018
1,962
#51
I don't know the story here but why that guy acts so strangely? Why he had a gun in first place and why he didn't seem receptive?
The cop was so scared that just killed him before there was an actual threat so he must be accountable for that, still I don't understand the behavior of the victim and how little he has done to avoid any misunderstanding.
being a black man cops pulling up on me guns drawn and all yelling at once is the most deer in the headlights situation i can think of.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,143
#52
Because there is nothing scarier to a cop than a black man who does, or might have, a gun.

Doesn't matter how many officers are aiming their own guns.
Doesn't matter what position the black man is in.
Doesn't matter if the gun is even on his person.

Their fear will always be telling them it's still possible for him to get the gun and kill them so they have to kill him first.
Yep. Remember the story where the cop shot and killed that guy who was naked? But then again maybe he was hiding a gun up his butthole, right?
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,280
#53
I found it hard to tell, was the gun in the door compartment or on his person? I feel like either way, the situation could have been resolved by having him put his hands up or on the back of his head rather than making him reach for the gun and 'fearing for your life'. American cops are such trash.
 
Nov 16, 2017
1,294
#54
That "you told me to"...
It such a proof of imcompetence, a proof of how this system doesn't work, a proof of police overreach... It just encompasses so much.
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,854
#55
I watched some show about a bunch of police cadets in training, I think it was on Netflix, maybe Prime, and after watching it I totally see how this can occur all of the time. They train police as if their lives are in danger every second, even as police fatalities have fallen something like 75% since 1960. They don't weed out the obvious gunslinger, aggressive cowboys/cowgirls. So this man was in a position where he was going to die. He tried to comply and still got shot. If we trained our police like they do in the UK or Sweden or hell almost anywhere in Europe this wouldn't have happened.
 
Nov 8, 2017
4,197
UK
#56
Yes, I think that they just needed to tell him to puts hands in the air slowly and then approach him and slowly arrest (for future investigation).
Why do you think him raising the gun slowly in the air would have had any other result?

They panicked at the sight of the gun and killed him without assessing whether it was a threat. What position the gun was in seems irrelevant considering they killed him while he held it by the slide(?), pointing away from everyone.

Again this is information they get explicitly as part of training.
Do you have a link to the training and where it's mentioned explicitly? Wouldn't mind looking at it for some insight as imagine it's quite eye opening.
 
Oct 25, 2017
7,086
Singapore
#60
It can. There's plenty of super capitalist countries where your common police patrol doesn't carry weapons and where officers get propper training for high stress situations and deescalation.

The US police is just shit.
Correct me if I'm wrong but this is what I think of the American understanding of capitalism:

The common understanding for Americans seem to be that capitalism has an end game where everything is for-profit, including essential services like police, healthcare, and prisons. So anything that isn't there yet, is moving towards that direction because of "capitalism" and even people who are doing these jobs are doing it because of the paycheck and/or perks/prestige/power.

So by definition any country that treats essential services as services, with proper training and systems in place to ensure they serve the people rather than themselves, cannot be "super capitalist".
 
Oct 26, 2017
3,251
#61
Correct me if I'm wrong but this is what I think of the American understanding of capitalism:

The common understanding for Americans seem to be that capitalism has an end game where everything is for-profit, including essential services like police, healthcare, and prisons. So anything that isn't there yet, is moving towards that direction because of "capitalism" and even people who are doing these jobs are doing it because of the paycheck and/or perks/prestige/power.

So by definition any country that treats essential services as services, with proper training and systems in place to ensure they serve the people rather than themselves, cannot be "super capitalist".
Police is still a public service in america though. And if say, the UK doesn't count as capitalist, there's a really narrow list of countries that do.

Which brings back the point that the police being as trigger happy as they are is a uniquely american problem.
 
Oct 27, 2017
4,048
#62
Correct me if I'm wrong but this is what I think of the American understanding of capitalism:

The common understanding for Americans seem to be that capitalism has an end game where everything is for-profit, including essential services like police, healthcare, and prisons. So anything that isn't there yet, is moving towards that direction because of "capitalism" and even people who are doing these jobs are doing it because of the paycheck and/or perks/prestige/power.

So by definition any country that treats essential services as services, with proper training and systems in place to ensure they serve the people rather than themselves, cannot be "super capitalist".
You can have a capitalist system and still have properly trained police. In addition, a capitalist society absolutely can have socialised services (that's the main point in favour of taxation, after all) while still being capitalist.

America is just a crap place to live. The problems here are terrible police training/hiring practices and the second amendment, which is probably the most well known mistake in the American constitution.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,258
Italy
#64
User Banned (1 Week): Victim Blaming
Why do you think him raising the gun slowly in the air would have had any other result?

They panicked at the sight of the gun and killed him without assessing whether it was a threat. What position the gun was in seems irrelevant considering they killed him while he held it by the slide(?), pointing away from everyone.
Have you watched the video? He wasn't holding the gun, he had in his pocket cause ammurica I need a gun for self protection.

Yes, it's his right as any other American, but is it necessary?

Now some racist and/or scared ppl saw a black man with a gun (I guess you could see it through his shirt/pants) in/near a burger king and called the police, without thinking of the great second amendment, they where just scared because going around with a gun shouldn't be "normal" or a right.

He was a black man in Usa so the scare from some ppl was way more accentuated.

Now, for me the idea of having a gun for self protection is pure bullshit, at least I can barely get it in a home/store situation (barely because we have read multiple times of kids killed by playing with a parent gun at home, in Italy too), but just going around with a gun because you can is crazy.
If someone try to rob your phone on the street you just shoot him? That's the whole idea behind the second amendment?
Oh no, you shot him only if you fear for your life, and do you really think this will ever work?
I would like to see what's the good that second amendment has done in the history of the Usa.

Now, going back to this case, the victim was in the worst possible position (metaphorically and literally) and didn't helped himself going any better by his strange position and lack of communication. He was scared? Yes, of course you can say that by seeing the outcome and know the whole situation.

I've seen black mans got shoted by Usa cops without having any gun and with free hand raised in the air multiple times and I've seen a similar situation where the suspect wasn't receptive with lack of communication and when he had the chance he just assaulted the cops.

Being a cop isn't easy, this is why only who is extremely well trained should he a cop.

The victim in this case just followed the cop oderd to put the gun down because they just told them that there was "a black man with a gun" around there, so they assumed he was holding it for some bad reason, so the victim actually extracted the gun from a semi blind spot.
The whole situation was extremely confused.

I was saying: Just let him raise his (free) hands in the air and then tell him to lay down.

But this wasn't actually applicable because the victim was hiding his hands, he was in a strange position where you couldn't saw exactly his hands movement and the cop just assumed that he was holding a gun cause that is what they told them.
If you add the fast trigger super panicked cop you have this result.

We need to start to go at the head of the problem and think "what are all the causes that lead to that situation?"

And there are a lot of causes, most of them cultural, by absurd laws, by racism, by unfortunate circumstances, by lack of proper training etc.

Just saying shit like "Acab burn them all down" is the same insane shit you hear on muslims after a terroristic attack, it's just braindead nonsense.

Let's start do be constructive and not destructive, otherwise we will have this issue over and over. By just venting on the single cop (or all of them) without thinking at the whole situation that lead at that outcome is just useless and doesn't help fix the issue in the long run.

And don't call this cop apologizing or victim blaming, this is just trying to analyze the fact from multiple perspectives. If you just want to know if I think that the cop is guilty: yes it is, but at the same time I blame whoever put him in that position since he clearly can't do this job, whoever miscommunicated the situation and at the same time I blame the whole gun culture that does only harm.
 
Oct 27, 2017
15
#66
Have you watched the video? He wasn't holding the gun, he had in his pocket cause ammurica I need a gun for self protection.

Yes, it's his right as any other American, but is it necessary?

Now some racist and/or scared ppl saw a black man with a gun (I guess you could see it through his shirt/pants) in/near a burger king and called the police, without thinking of the great second amendment, they where just scared because going around with a gun shouldn't be "normal" or a right.

He was a black man in Usa so the scare from some ppl was way more accentuated.

Now, for me the idea of having a gun for self protection is pure bullshit, at least I can barely get it in a home/store situation (barely because we have read multiple times of kids killed by playing with a parent gun at home, in Italy too), but just going around with a gun because you can is crazy.
If someone try to rob your phone on the street you just shoot him? That's the whole idea behind the second amendment?
Oh no, you shot him only if you fear for your life, and do you really think this will ever work?
I would like to see what's the good that second amendment has done in the history of the Usa.

Now, going back to this case, the victim was in the worst possible position (metaphorically and literally) and didn't helped himself going any better by his strange position and lack of communication. He was scared? Yes, of course you can say that by seeing the outcome and know the whole situation.

I've seen black mans got shoted by Usa cops without having any gun and with free hand raised in the air multiple times and I've seen a similar situation where the suspect wasn't receptive with lack of communication and when he had the chance he just assaulted the cops.

Being a cop isn't easy, this is why only who is extremely well trained should he a cop.

The victim in this case just followed the cop oderd to put the gun down because they just told them that there was "a black man with a gun" around there, so they assumed he was holding it for some bad reason, so the victim actually extracted the gun from a semi blind spot.
The whole situation was extremely confused.

I was saying: Just let him raise his (free) hands in the air and then tell him to lay down.

But this wasn't actually applicable because the victim was hiding his hands, he was in a strange position where you couldn't saw exactly his hands movement and the cop just assumed that he was holding a gun cause that is what they told them.
If you add the fast trigger super panicked cop you have this result.

We need to start to go at the head of the problem and think "what are all the causes that lead to that situation?"

And there are a lot of causes, most of them cultural, by absurd laws, by racism, by unfortunate circumstances, by lack of proper training etc.

Just saying shit like "Acab burn them all down" is the same insane shit you hear on muslims after a terroristic attack, it's just braindead nonsense.

Let's start do be constructive and not destructive, otherwise we will have this issue over and over. By just venting on the single cop (or all of them) without thinking at the whole situation that lead at that outcome is just useless and doesn't help fix the issue in the long run.

And don't call this cop apologizing or victim blaming, this is just trying to analyze the fact from multiple perspectives. If you just want to know if I think that the cop is guilty: yes it is, but at the same time I blame whoever put him in that position since he clearly can't do this job, whoever miscommunicated the situation and at the same time I blame the whole gun culture that does only harm.
How do you expect Black Americans to be constructive about this issue? There are systemic issues that a significant portion of the United States fails to acknowledge exist. Even in this circumstance, with video evidence, nothing will be done to the officer. This is a case that has repeated over and over again in this country.

The entire system is intrinsically designed to be denigrating to people of color and it's not getting better. There are not multiple sides to this story. This person decided to work this job, was trained the same way the other officers were, decided to gun down a man, and will not be punished for it. The entire system needs to be reconstructed.
 
Jan 10, 2019
799
#68
How are the police trained in the US? Like what in the actual fuck.

If (and that's a IF) a police officer uses his weapon over here, thats national news. They use them like once a year or something.

How can one country be so fucking disgusting with basically everything.
 
Oct 25, 2017
33,223
#70
Oct 29, 2017
1,669
#73
That's mad. American police are so poorly trained and never seemed to be held accountable.

I really don't understand why every black man with a gun is an immediate threat and you can justifiable kill him in the street because of it but white people with guns are patriots and it's so good that they're upholding the amendment.

It's so telling that the NRA never comes out in these situations but I guess they're too busy scaring white people about gangs (read: black people), terrorists (read: Muslims and anyone that looks a bit muslim) and aliens (read: Mexicans and anyone that looks vaguely Latin American) just so they can sell more guns. They're just stoking the flames of racism and fear for profit, they don't give a shit about anyone.

Just. Fuck everyone at this point.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,322
#76
it happens again and again but hey lets criticise POC for kneeling during the national anthem. What a fucked up country. It keeps happening because there are zero consequences for this shit. Zero, those cops are murderers, how is it possible for no action to be taken?