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YouGov survey: British sarcasm 'lost on Americans'

Aug 20, 2018
2,198
#52
British humor/sarcasm is boring.

That's all there is to it, really (as an American).
i don't know man/mate/dude...i'm singaporean so i'm not 'allied' to either side but........i've always preferred British sitcom than the American sitcom. The IT Crowd shits over what......thing......American sitcom seems to call themselves.

Just a 3rd party throwing his views on the brit/yank humour debate i guess :P
 
Oct 25, 2017
283
#53
Nah, it is great. (Impartial swede vote)
Also, I think the correct spelling is humour. ;)
It's typically a little dry for me, but I'm not about to fight over it. I respect your opinion, but I may be a bit biased because I love Kent.

i don't know man/mate/dude...i'm singaporean so i'm not 'allied' to either side but........i've always preferred British sitcom than the American sitcom. The IT Crowd shits over what......thing......American sitcom seems to call themselves.

Just a 3rd party throwing his views on the brit/yank humour debate i guess :P
I'm not going to say that I like the US version of Office or anything. I'm in the weird position of liking the odd campiness that Dr Who and such have, but also finding a lot of the humor to be a complete miss with me... if not outright awkward.
 
Nov 1, 2017
540
#56
It's typically a little dry for me, but I'm not about to fight over it. I respect your opinion, but I may be a bit biased because I love Kent.
The dryness is an acquired taste but it can be really great. If you are an reader, try Terry Pratchett. To me, he embodies British humour with many layers.
But don't get me wrong, I really like american humor as well.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,235
#59
i don't know man/mate/dude...i'm singaporean so i'm not 'allied' to either side but........i've always preferred British sitcom than the American sitcom. The IT Crowd shits over what......thing......American sitcom seems to call themselves.

Just a 3rd party throwing his views on the brit/yank humour debate i guess :P
I don’t care about anything else in this topic, but Seinfeld is better than whatever you call a sitcom, also curb your enthusiasm (by the same guy).
 
Dec 10, 2018
302
#61
Quick query to Americans and I hope I'm not being rude by asking, but there was something curious an American once said to me and I just want your opinions/thoughts on it. I used to live with this American guy and we were watching Becker and Cheers followed by Gordon Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmare. I asked the American guy "Why is there always a laugh track in these comedies, and why is there always this overly dramatic piano music, creeping/plucking strings and symbol hit sounds in reality shows". He replied "Some Americans don't know when something is funny or know how to feel about certain situations, so they get queues to tell them how to feel about a joke or a serious situation". I found it a bit odd and I'm not sure how I should take his response or whether or not he is just bullshitting me. If anyone can share some light on what he means, that would clear this up.
 
Oct 25, 2017
3,491
#63


The strangest thing about living in Taiwan is that, in every interaction, you've got a layer of politeness that conceals a layer of profane annoyance that is itself concealing a layer of deep sadness and skepticism. Sarcasm doesn't really work here, though.

Quick query to Americans and I hope I'm not being rude by asking, but there was something curious an American once said to me and I just want your opinions/thoughts on it. I used to live with this American guy and we were watching Becker and Cheers followed by Gordon Ramsey's Kitchen Nightmare. I asked the American guy "Why is there always a laugh track in these comedies, and why is there always this overly dramatic piano music, creeping/plucking strings and symbol hit sounds in reality shows". He replied "Some Americans don't know when something is funny or know how to feel about certain situations, so they get queues to tell them how to feel about a joke or a serious situation". I found it a bit odd and I'm not sure how I should take his response or whether or not he is just bullshitting me. If anyone can share some light on what he means, that would clear this up.
Laugh tracks and musical interludes are a thing in Britain and other Commonwealth/European countries as well. It comes from the first television comedies being an extension of Vaudeville, performed in front of a live studio audience, and is just kind of a tradition, even if the shows aren't shot in front of an audience anymore.
 
Dec 10, 2018
302
#66
Laugh tracks and musical interludes are a thing in Britain and other Commonwealth/European countries as well. It comes from the first television comedies being an extension of Vaudeville, performed in front of a live studio audience, and is just kind of a tradition, even if the shows aren't shot in front of an audience anymore.
Now that you mention it, British shows did have laugh tracks in them.
 
Oct 28, 2017
914
#68
In my experience it's the more stereotypical, boisterous American types that are more confused by sarcasm. Most Americans seem fine with it although they are usually prone to pointing out they are being sarcastic when using sarcasm themselves, as noted by the many "/s" posts on here, something I never see on British-dominated forums.