Actresses, CEOs arrested in nationwide college admissions cheating scam

Smokeymicpot

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,259
https://abcnews.go.com/US/actresses-ceos-arrested-nationwide-college-admissions-cheating-scam/story?id=61627873

Actresses and chief executives are among 50 people arrested in a nationwide college admissions cheating scam, according to court records unsealed in Boston Tuesday.

Those indicted allegedly paid bribes of up to $6 million to get their children into elite colleges, including Yale, Stanford, Georgetown and the University of Southern California, federal prosecutors said.

In most cases the students did not know their admission was contingent on a bribe, officials said.



BREAKING / NBC NEWS: Hollywood actresses Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin are two of over 40 people charged in the college exam scheme, according to court documents.
 
Oct 30, 2017
4,177
Poor kids. Gotta live with the fact that their parents thought they were too stupid to get in on merit. What a shitty thing to do.
 

Baroque

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,072
I thought that's how things happened anyways. Your rich daddy donated a new wing to the college and in return they let you in.
 

Slayven

You probably post about me on another board.
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
32,706
If you got 6 million plus college money, why not set your kid up so they don't need college?
 

Kuroyume

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,933
Fuck them. Hope they hit the schools equally as hard. Actually, punish them even harder.
 

Volimar

Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
10,291
Feel bad for those kids who didn't know their parents bought their way in. That's going to be hard to shake.
 

Slayven

You probably post about me on another board.
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
32,706
But for real I really want to see how the actresses connect to this, they are not exactly A-list
 

Brakke

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,027
“There's no indication that the schools were involved in any of the wrong-doing.”

lol9
 

AquaRegia

Member
Oct 25, 2017
816
This doesn't seem to just be about money. Coaches getting charged and accusations of fraud means this isn't the normal legacy admission payment.
 

Slayven

You probably post about me on another board.
Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
32,706
This doesn't seem to just be about money. Coaches getting charged and accusations of fraud means this isn't the normal legacy admission payment.
They porbably brought a few players too, a problem that wouldn't be there if they would pay the kids
 

MIMIC

Member
Dec 18, 2017
2,780
The documents say actress Lori Loughlin -- best known for her role as Aunt Becky on the ABC sitcom "Full House" -- and her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, "agreed to pay bribes totaling $500,000 in exchange for having their two daughters designated as recruits to the USC crew team -- despite the fact that they did not participate in crew -- thereby facilitating their admission to USC."
LMAO. Brazen as fuck.
 

NealMcCauley

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,582
Article makes it appear like there are different types of bribing at hand. Huffman sounds like she bribed someone involved with an entrance exam while Loughlin faked athletic credentials.
 

OtherWorldly

Member
Dec 3, 2018
2,052
https://abcnews.go.com/US/hollywood-actors-ceos-charged-nationwide-college-admissions-cheating/story?id=61627873

Hollywood actors, including Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, and a slew of chief executives are among 50 people charged in a nationwide college admissions cheating scam, according to court records unsealed in Boston Tuesday.

Those indicted allegedly paid bribes of up to $6 million to get their children into elite colleges, including Yale, Stanford, Georgetown and the University of Southern California, federal prosecutors said.


"Beginning in or about 2011, and continuing through the present, the defendants -- principally individuals whose high-school age children were applying to college -- conspired with others to use bribery and other forms of fraud to facilitate their children's admission to colleges and universities in the District of Massachusetts and elsewhere, including Yale University, Stanford University, the University of Texas, the University of Southern California, and the University of Southern California -- Los Angeles," the indictment said.
 

GoldenEye 007

Roll Tide, Y'all!
Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,229
Texas
This doesn't seem to just be about money. Coaches getting charged and accusations of fraud means this isn't the normal legacy admission payment.
Yeah this will be interesting to see. Seems with coaches actually being involved, some of the athletes may have actually been good, but clearly not able to get into college on their own academic merits.

And as an admissions professional, athletic applicants are frequently handled differently than regular applicants and are not in the review list of other students. So could a coach with maybe one other staff member finagle a good athlete in that shouldn't be in academically? Maybe. Guess we're about to find out.

It certainly could be done without the knowledge of the regular admissions staff.
 

Volimar

Moderator
Oct 25, 2017
10,291
Yeah if I was one of the kids I would use my trust fund money to wipe away those tears.

Well that's kind of my point. Imagine thinking you accomplished this. Not your parents, not your family money, you. You got in on your own merits. Only you didn't, and maybe you don't find out until years later. Yeah, financially you're going to be fine, but it's a kick in the teeth that everything you thought you built off that college education was because your parents bought your way in. Kind of sucks for them.
 

Jag

Member
Oct 26, 2017
3,081
My son is trying to get into college this year. Wish I knew that this was an option.
 

Kmonk

Member
Oct 30, 2017
1,345
US
I thought that's how things happened anyways. Your rich daddy donated a new wing to the college and in return they let you in.
Yeah, but in this case, the money went to specific individuals (i.e. coaches) rather than to the schools themselves. But you make a great point- if they had offered this type of cash to school administrators as a donation to the school, they absolutely could have worked it out in a totally legit way.



I believe that's a link to this thread?
 

nsilvias

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,182
Chicago
Yeah, but in this case, the money went to specific individuals (i.e. coaches) rather than to the schools themselves. But you make a great point- if they had offered this type of cash to school administrators as a donation to the school, they absolutely could have worked it out in a totally legit way.





I believe that's a link to this thread?
nope, just same title.
edit: oh merged thread