Applying for jobs is exhausting and soul-crushing

Gigglepoo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,581
After only doing freelance work for almost five years, I put my resume on Monster after my buddy had good results. Got bombarded by recruiters and landed a 12-month contract at Apple really quickly. Feels good to be working again! And I'm making more than I've ever made in my life. Yay for Monster? Who knew.
 

Zefah

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
5,890
Take it with a grain of salt, but my take is that your profile sounds a bit arrogant and contains irrelevant information. I would rewrite it in the third person at least. Also, probably don't include the English teaching bit in your opening profile if you're trying to find marketing jobs. Maybe something like this?

"Highly motivated and capable marketing professional fluent in Mandarin Chinese with 9 years of professional experience working in China, most recently as a Marketing Manager in charge of a team across two locations for a private school in Dalian, CN."

For your work experience, I think it would be better if you rewrote each bullet point to begin with a past tense verb (Planned, Reviewed, Managed, Oversaw, etc.). For example, in your third bullet for Business English Instructor, maybe rewrite to read like this:

"Guided students from a rudimentary level of understanding of business English to being able to conduct meetings with foreign clients in English."

Just some general advice, but I'm not an HR professional or anything, so keep that in mind. Best of luck in the job search!
 

LoneAmorphous

Member
Mar 6, 2019
222
Los Angeles, CA
Just moved to LA maybe two weeks ago? Drove out 42 hours by myself pretty much. (i pretty much had no other choice but to leave my family so)

Even to get a PA job, whew - have to put in a lot more work than i've ever had to, but it's only been two weeks. Gonna stay optimistic and keep pushing, be persistent, and maybe look at freelancing as well. My idea goal is to work at a trailer editing company, but I'm really proficient in graphic design, some camera work (1st AC), and some other skillsets as well.

We'll see how this goes.
 

Septimus Prime

EA
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
4,046
So, first, I would cut it down to one page and reduce the amount of text overall. You want to get the maximum impact as quickly as possible because when I loaded it up and saw a wall of text, it immediately set my frame of mind to reading the whole thing being a chore.

That aside, your bullet points are all over the place. "Recently managed," "SEO optimizing," "Reviewing," "Planned," "4 years," "Responsible for," "During my time," and "Oversaw" are the starting phrases for your bullet points in your top two experience blocks. It's really jarring to read that, and ideally you'll want to start with verbs with consistent tense: managed, optimized, reviewed, planned, etc. Those are just examples where I used the verbs from your current job, though; you'll want to tune them up more and listen to the suggestions from other posters, as well as switch to current tense for your current job.

Anyway, that's just a start. I haven't had time to dig in, and I don't work in marketing, so I'll see if I have more to add later.
 

Brandino

Avenger
Jan 9, 2018
102
I just got myself a new job through hired.com. They're more tech focused, but it was a pretty passive process. Took longer than I thought it would, but I got a 25% raise from my current position and am now making over 6 figures.
 
Oct 27, 2017
5,543
So, first, I would cut it down to one page and reduce the amount of text overall. You want to get the maximum impact as quickly as possible because when I loaded it up and saw a wall of text, it immediately set my frame of mind to reading the whole thing being a chore.

That aside, your bullet points are all over the place. "Recently managed," "SEO optimizing," "Reviewing," "Planned," "4 years," "Responsible for," "During my time," and "Oversaw" are the starting phrases for your bullet points in your top two experience blocks. It's really jarring to read that, and ideally you'll want to start with verbs with consistent tense: managed, optimized, reviewed, planned, etc. Those are just examples where I used the verbs from your current job, though; you'll want to tune them up more and listen to the suggestions from other posters, as well as switch to current tense for your current job.

Anyway, that's just a start. I haven't had time to dig in, and I don't work in marketing, so I'll see if I have more to add later.
I don't have a current job. That's what I'm looking for
 

Endymion

Member
Oct 27, 2017
246
So... a bit of an odd question but... what's the over under on getting a job and then immediately going on the job hunt again? Long story long; not sure if my new job is for me. I had to move across state for it (i'm crashing at a friend's house so no lease commitments) and the area is hella expensive. I make alright money and i'd be scraping by in a studio apartment by the looks of it.

On top of this a nice looking position has opened up at a university in my hometown. Better pay, the area is way cheaper, and the commute wont make me wanna zone out and crash. Now, I am gonna apply for it and i'm not even gonna bother with putting the new job on the resume. I'm just gonna use the same resume and references that got me the job I just got but should I mention my situation in my cover letter? I was thinking I would mention that my new job may not be a right fit for me and I would like to take my services elsewhere.

Anyone have any experience with this situation? Any tips?
I left my previous job after five months after realizing one month in that I needed to abandon that situation. I've never done a cover letter so I can't speak to that part, but during the phone interview I politely explained the situation -- that I was misled regarding some aspects of the job (health care, benefits, PTO) and that despite having a programmer title, I wasn't actually doing any programming, and thus felt like I was stunting my career growth and future marketability. Obviously leaving a company quickly can be a bad look, but don't feel obligated to stay if the situation isn't working out for you. Just try to be professional in how you represent your reasons for why you want to leave.
 

nevercomehome

Member
Oct 25, 2017
229
I left my previous job after five months after realizing one month in that I needed to abandon that situation. I've never done a cover letter so I can't speak to that part, but during the phone interview I politely explained the situation -- that I was misled regarding some aspects of the job (health care, benefits, PTO) and that despite having a programmer title, I wasn't actually doing any programming, and thus felt like I was stunting my career growth and future marketability. Obviously leaving a company quickly can be a bad look, but don't feel obligated to stay if the situation isn't working out for you. Just try to be professional in how you represent your reasons for why you want to leave.
Yeah, this is how I've been handling the situation so far. I have an interview with a (hopefully) better job next week and I'm not gonna bring it up since I didn't include it on my resume.

Good to know.
 

octopedes

Member
Feb 3, 2018
176
I keep applying to jobs but never make it to a phone screener or an interview. It's driving me into depression. My coworkers are able to get higher paying jobs elsewhere seemingly without issue even with less experience than me. Is it my resume, my portfolio, or just me?

Don't know, but this is definitely exhausting and soul crushing.
 

BigWinnie1

Banned
Feb 19, 2018
2,497
I'm gonna be honest. I was lost for awhile searching for jobs but I kinda fell into a Driving job and UPS and the pay is amazing. Even as a part-time thing it will help you out because you get full benefits even if you work part time as a package handler its an excellent place to tide yourself over while looking for another job and if you decide to stay for a bit they will even pay for a bit of your college and pay into your 401k
 

Ac30

Member
Oct 30, 2017
11,070
London
Can anyone give any tips for the final interview round for a consultancy job (in this case life sciences)? They're asking me to put together a 15 min presentation on a topic of my choice that showcases my analytical skills describes what data sources/info I used. They've given me 5 days to put something together and tbh I'm freaking out. Thinking of putting my MSc master's thesis project in powerpoint form with a clear description of the data analysis I did but I'm not sure that's a good idea... I'd think they'd want something more relevant to the job (i.e. market analysis, product pipeline development for pharma) but I have no idea where to start for something like that.
 

Wetwork

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
1,609
Colorado
I just had an interview with my IBEW Local. I’m incredibly nervous; I hope I scored well enough to get into this year’s apprenticeship.
 

RolandGunner

Member
Oct 30, 2017
3,106
I keep applying to jobs but never make it to a phone screener or an interview. It's driving me into depression. My coworkers are able to get higher paying jobs elsewhere seemingly without issue even with less experience than me. Is it my resume, my portfolio, or just me?

Don't know, but this is definitely exhausting and soul crushing.
If your co-workers are moving up it sounds like a resume / portfolio issue. I’d reach out to a professional resume writer. They aren’t cheap but a better job is worth it. Also are you staying connected with these people that are leaving? Getting recommended by one of them is the best way to get noticed.
 

JeTmAn

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,555
I keep applying to jobs but never make it to a phone screener or an interview. It's driving me into depression. My coworkers are able to get higher paying jobs elsewhere seemingly without issue even with less experience than me. Is it my resume, my portfolio, or just me?

Don't know, but this is definitely exhausting and soul crushing.
It can be a variety of things. It's tough when you just don't know. Yesterday I went to a meetup at a place of work I've applied to several times and never heard back from, including very recently. Turns out somebody I know was there and I found out he got the job I was applying for despite being much less qualified than me. But he already knew people that worked there, so that gave him an inside track. I don't know if anyone ever even looked at my resume. Sometimes it's just who you know.
 

nicoga3000

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,786
Ima stealth drop this...I need a fucking civil/structural engineer so bad. The market for engineers is crazy dry right now.

Any of you guys who post in this thread have any suggestions on where to look? My LinkedIn post gets a bunch of applicants in the wrong field or who have clearly not read my job description (that explicitly states no non-Civil and no Doctoral degrees).
 

nevercomehome

Member
Oct 25, 2017
229
Welp my interview is this Friday. It feels weird interviewing when you already have a job since i've only ever done it when I was unemployed but at least my livelihood doesn't depend on this one hour. Still, I've been looking at job interview tip videos all this week in hopes of being able to land this superior position. Thankfully they said they plan on choosing quickly since they want to fill this roll asap. Wish me luck everyone.
 

nevercomehome

Member
Oct 25, 2017
229
Also I figure I should ask this here. Any other graphic designers/creative workers have any knowledge on where to look and how to land remote positions?
 

firehawk12

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,745
Is there a good way to turn down a job without burning a bridge? Or will they just see that you wasted their time regardless of what you might say?
 

nicoga3000

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,786
Is there a good way to turn down a job without burning a bridge? Or will they just see that you wasted their time regardless of what you might say?
Honesty. We've had a few candidates turn down offers, and the only one we have written off is a no-go is the one who kept coming up with excuses. Be professional, though.

Can we ask why you're turning it down to give a little more direction?
 

Malvingt2

Member
Oct 25, 2017
778
Yonkers, NY
So I am applying internal for a promotion. My company network and I am targeting 3 states (AZ,SC and NC). AZ one the recruiter called me for a screening interview and that didn't last 5 minutes. I didn't like the offer and they are refusing to add relocation package. I asked max MRP money because of that. 5 Minutes later recruiter called me to tell me that hire manager will ask an exemption for that amount. My thing is that the relocation package is important to me so I went panic mode and asked the max!. I was not expecting them to comeback to me . So now this is the job that I have less desired to take. The NC one is going slow with hiring process and SC yet to do anything with me.

So the hiring manager is going to call me next week from the AZ one. I need some advice; Should I try to bring relocation to the table again? I rather take less money and go with relo to be honest. I am single so it should not be a lot of money to move from TN however I got relocated ones by this company and it was so smooth.
 

firehawk12

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,745
Honesty. We've had a few candidates turn down offers, and the only one we have written off is a no-go is the one who kept coming up with excuses. Be professional, though.

Can we ask why you're turning it down to give a little more direction?
Thanks!

I'm being a bit presumptuous assuming I did well on two of them, but one is simply the salary being low compared to what I make now - I had applied to it months before getting my current position, but wanted to do it for the interview experience anyway.

The other is that it would require a move away from my current city; it's not too far, but far enough that even though it's an interesting opportunity I'm just hesitating and having some second thoughts now that it's closer to being real than not.

They're both also government jobs, which probably changes the context a bit, but also means I may end up burning bridges within the greater government context since the community of this type of position within government is relatively small.

I was thinking of basically using a "family situation" excuse, at least for the one that would require a move, but does that sound like a cop out? It's not necessarily a lie, but it's also not the whole truth either. I'm not sure what I would do with the other position.

I guess the other thing is that people have told me that this is why multiple people are interviewed and people have backups that they can call so I shouldn't worry too much either, but I just don't want to leave the these relationships in a bad place.
 

nicoga3000

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,786
Thanks!

I'm being a bit presumptuous assuming I did well on two of them, but one is simply the salary being low compared to what I make now - I had applied to it months before getting my current position, but wanted to do it for the interview experience anyway.

The other is that it would require a move away from my current city; it's not too far, but far enough that even though it's an interesting opportunity I'm just hesitating and having some second thoughts now that it's closer to being real than not.

They're both also government jobs, which probably changes the context a bit, but also means I may end up burning bridges within the greater government context since the community of this type of position within government is relatively small.

I was thinking of basically using a "family situation" excuse, at least for the one that would require a move, but does that sound like a cop out? It's not necessarily a lie, but it's also not the whole truth either. I'm not sure what I would do with the other position.

I guess the other thing is that people have told me that this is why multiple people are interviewed and people have backups that they can call so I shouldn't worry too much either, but I just don't want to leave the these relationships in a bad place.
Two different situations that I think you can still approach from the same angle - be honest and have simple points that represent your decision.

For salary, it boils down to it the desire for a lateral move. Or closer to a lateral move. While you're interested in the position, you have to consider your financial situation and the impact taking a cut (when you also consider benefits) will have on your situation. They may able to come closer to your current salary if you're a top candidate. Maybe not. But the phrase "lateral move" says you want more money without having to come out and say it.

For relocating, that one was recently brought up to us. This person straight up said they just weren't really ready to relocate right now. It can be scary/difficult/intimidating/etc. And there's things like salary and benefits (for that lateral move), as well as cost of living. I'm in Indy, so cost of living is almost always cheaper than where people are coming from. But you may just not be ready for that huge change, especially since you may very well be established in your current location with work, friends, activities, etc.

I think the best thing you can do is, like I said, be honest and explain the explicit reasons why you are going to turn them down. Turning down a lower salary shouldn't raise any red flags. Turning down a relocation will probably make them think you may NOT be worth their time in the future, but if you part on good terms and re-apply later AND bring that fact up (that you weren't ready to move at the time, but you're now in a better place personally/financially/whatever), it may give you those bonus points you need to get back in front of them for the next round.

Sorry, on my phone typing this. Hopefully you get something out of my post (or other folks who respond). I think turning down an offer is likely just as tough as accepting one...Two different life events that, really, impact your future in one way or another. Wish you the best, though!
 

Nimrod

Member
Nov 3, 2017
50
Had an interview for a traineeship last week that really would be super interesting and fun. Waiting for the response is kinda awful though. Anything else to do besides sending a thank you email?
 

Ac30

Member
Oct 30, 2017
11,070
London
Had an interview for a traineeship last week that really would be super interesting and fun. Waiting for the response is kinda awful though. Anything else to do besides sending a thank you email?
You can send a follow-up email to inquire about the status of your candidacy if it’s been over a week since you’ve heard from them. They might just be busy with other interviews.
 

firehawk12

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,745
Two different situations that I think you can still approach from the same angle - be honest and have simple points that represent your decision.

For salary, it boils down to it the desire for a lateral move. Or closer to a lateral move. While you're interested in the position, you have to consider your financial situation and the impact taking a cut (when you also consider benefits) will have on your situation. They may able to come closer to your current salary if you're a top candidate. Maybe not. But the phrase "lateral move" says you want more money without having to come out and say it.

For relocating, that one was recently brought up to us. This person straight up said they just weren't really ready to relocate right now. It can be scary/difficult/intimidating/etc. And there's things like salary and benefits (for that lateral move), as well as cost of living. I'm in Indy, so cost of living is almost always cheaper than where people are coming from. But you may just not be ready for that huge change, especially since you may very well be established in your current location with work, friends, activities, etc.

I think the best thing you can do is, like I said, be honest and explain the explicit reasons why you are going to turn them down. Turning down a lower salary shouldn't raise any red flags. Turning down a relocation will probably make them think you may NOT be worth their time in the future, but if you part on good terms and re-apply later AND bring that fact up (that you weren't ready to move at the time, but you're now in a better place personally/financially/whatever), it may give you those bonus points you need to get back in front of them for the next round.

Sorry, on my phone typing this. Hopefully you get something out of my post (or other folks who respond). I think turning down an offer is likely just as tough as accepting one...Two different life events that, really, impact your future in one way or another. Wish you the best, though!
No, that’s great and very helpful advice - I appreciate it! It really is a lot to think about for sure. Thanks! :)
 

nevercomehome

Member
Oct 25, 2017
229
So I had my interview last Friday. A bunch of thoughts currently going around my head since it seems like the position isn't something i'd enjoy doing/be successful in. So now i'm just left thinking "well if they offer it to me I shouldn't take it since I have an entry-level position that i'm currently growing more comfortable with" and that's assuming I do get it offered to me.

What a strange position to be in lol.
 

Gawge

Member
Oct 27, 2017
393
Started applying for some jobs recently, I am in a fortunate position that I am in a decent job that I don't hate - but I feel I probably should be moving on soon.

Anyway, i'm sure it has been mentioned, but my god it is frustrating having to complete individualised forms/applications for every single role. Maybe it's because I am broadly within healthcare in the UK, so it is a bit more public-sector-ish in terms of the appointment process.

Wish I could shoot off a CV and then if they want more detailed information prior to an interview - then at that point you complete the form. Sometimes a job sounds worth a gamble on applying, but then you see their horrendous 10-step online application form and don't bother. I mean I have some decent saved cover letters and applications so do a lot of copy and pasting, but it's all so tedious.
 

twinturbo2

Member
Oct 27, 2017
714
Jupiter, FL
I applied for an entry level customer service job and was expecting a phone call. Just got an email within the hour explaining they went for another candidate, presumably for experience.

I'm pretty close to just taking a call center job.
 

VHS

Member
May 8, 2019
774
Graduating in Fall 2019 with my Bachelors of Science in Computer Science. Was told by a few already graduated and working friends to start applying now...

Any tips on improving a linkedin profile, and other avenues? Tired of the constant rejections, want something to at least build on. It's not like I have no technical experience, I've had my current programming job for nearly 3 years now...
 
Oct 28, 2017
3,444
Graduating in Fall 2019 with my Bachelors of Science in Computer Science. Was told by a few already graduated and working friends to start applying now...

Any tips on improving a linkedin profile, and other avenues? Tired of the constant rejections, want something to at least build on. It's not like I have no technical experience, I've had my current programming job for nearly 3 years now...
How much have you been applying? Are you only applying to local positions? It will be tougher to find new grad positions at this time since the majority of new grad roles aim for a spring graduation.

From my experience, LinkedIn has typically lead to the more sketchy or at least less-favorable job opportunities. I wouldn’t rely on it. Honestly, just don’t worry about the rejection. I applied to a ton of jobs, managed to get a really good job at one of the biggest companies you can work in with a CS degree. And yet, I’m still regularly getting rejection letters flowing in from old applications. It’s a numbers game.
 

VHS

Member
May 8, 2019
774
How much have you been applying? Are you only applying to local positions? It will be tougher to find new grad positions at this time since the majority of new grad roles aim for a spring graduation.

From my experience, LinkedIn has typically lead to the more sketchy or at least less-favorable job opportunities. I wouldn’t rely on it. Honestly, just don’t worry about the rejection. I applied to a ton of jobs, managed to get a really good job at one of the biggest companies you can work in with a CS degree. And yet, I’m still regularly getting rejection letters flowing in from old applications. It’s a numbers game.
Nah, I am not really tied down to anything so I've been applying in basically all the tech cities. I want to move to a bigger metro area that's about all I would like. What are some other avenues for applying? I don't want to do the whole browsing local cities craigslist thing.
 
Oct 28, 2017
3,444
Nah, I am not really tied down to anything so I've been applying in basically all the tech cities. I want to move to a bigger metro area that's about all I would like. What are some other avenues for applying? I don't want to do the whole browsing local cities craigslist thing.
I’d probably google for an aggregated list of cs grad level jobs. Should be able to find a resource that list which companies are big new grad hires. Then I would practice leet code or something.

You said you have 3 years of programming work experience, so that should get you ahead.
 

VHS

Member
May 8, 2019
774
I’d probably google for an aggregated list of cs grad level jobs. Should be able to find a resource that list which companies are big new grad hires. Then I would practice leet code or something.

You said you have 3 years of programming work experience, so that should get you ahead.
One friend had a freaking awesome experience with triplebyte, got him a very well paying job right out of college but every single other person I know has failed their tests.

Another friend recommended Hired, and interviewing.io apparently the tech 4 use it for teaching interview skills?
 

water_tempo

Member
Oct 31, 2017
78
It can be really difficult based upon your personality (i am really shy, so it was awful for me) but networking has advantages. Find people that have the career you want, alumni, friends of friends, and ask if they are willing to meet for coffee and talk about how they got started, what the field looks like, what skills are hot right now, etc. End it by letting them know you are looking and asking if they know of someone else you can meet with. If they give you a name or tell you about a job, ask them if it is cool to mention their name and keep at it. Its a pain, but if you can hustle it, it can really help.

Alternatively, go to meetups or hackathons and start networking that way. Is your github portfolio cleaned up and do you have a few things to show off? Do you have some depth on there or is it more specialized in just a certain language or area of development.

I know jack all about getting cs jobs, but those are just some thoughts off the top of my head. The networking thing helps though. As a recruiter, if I've got a pile of 100 applications to look through, but Jessica in accounting recommended you (and I don't hate Jessica), you are at least going to get more of my time than you might have otherwise.
 

Tebunker

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,721
Anyone have any tips for applying out-of-state? Moving to Boulder for my wife’s job and I feel like my location is holding me back.
Having been in a similar position, I really only noted a change in response when I put relocating to City/state by XXXX Date on the top of my resume. Or if you already have a local address or know where you are staying put that on your resume now.

You will see a noted up tick in responses.
 

Septimus Prime

EA
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
4,046
Having been in a similar position, I really only noted a change in response when I put relocating to City/state by XXXX Date on the top of my resume. Or if you already have a local address or know where you are staying put that on your resume now.

You will see a noted up tick in responses.
That's a double-edged sword, though, since you're probably waiting relocation assistance.
 

Jay Mcsaros

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,011
It took 7 months to land a new job, a month in and I think I’ve made a mistake. Was an internal promotion, but I feel like my external search needs to go on.
 

Tebunker

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,721
That's a double-edged sword, though, since you're probably waiting relocation assistance.
Fair but unless you are in a pretty in demand position good luck getting it.

If the market is light on applicants yeah you can hope, but at least in my experience no one wanted to pay for relocation. Which sucked. And since it sounds like the poster is relocating for their spouses job already no reason to get greedy on that end. You always ask.

I had several orgs though straight tell me the only reason they even acknowledged my resume was because I said I was moving to the area. Otherwise they would have just stuck with the local candidate pool. Some careers just don't have the amount of people. For better or worse a lot of people are getting in to data analytics and reporting, so getting someone to pay for a relocation is a lot harder for me.
 

PhoenixSFT

Member
Oct 25, 2017
307
Alexandria, VA
I added the relocation info to my resume and explicitly stated that I did not need relocation assistance since my wife already received that from her new job.

Ask A Manager blog had some great advice for moving out of state.
 

Thanatos

Resettlement Advisor
Verified
Oct 25, 2017
288
Montreal
I left the video game industry a year ago and lately I've found myself really wanting to go back to the industry (not my old company). Since I live in Montreal there is a lot of solid industry jobs and a friend who works for one of the big AAA publishers here suggested I put a resume in with them that he could boost a little. While I'm not miserable at my current job, I'm not happy either, and I find myself wanting to get back to what I love. I'll also be applying to EA and all the other usual suspects if I don't hear back in two weeks.

My current job is also promising me career growth via job title change later this year, so I'm not doomed and I can luckily take it slow and aim for jobs I really want.

Even with all that said, modern job hunting can be soul-crushing because you get hopeful when you turn in a very solid resume and CV that should logically lead to an interview (and when I aim at any other industry but video games I do get at least an interview) only companies to never get back to you. I'm very thankful I have a job because if anything it allows me to just keep accruing experience to hopefully springboard back into video games.

Everyone else going through the grind: good luck!
 
Oct 25, 2017
10,056
"Hey we're going to have someone contact you tomorrow to set up an interview."

*A week then passes without hearing anything and the person that originally contacted me won't even bother to pick up the phone when I call to see what's going on.*

Fucking cool.