Jason Momoa says he can’t shoot Aquaman 2 due to protesting (construction of a giant telescope on sacred Hawaiian land)

Televator

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,934
I'm not talking about this specific telescope, exactly. My thoughts on this specifically are more or less: sure, the project appears to have been approved democratically, but protests are a part of democracy too. The locals should have agency in these decisions.

But it's important to think through things more generally too, right? That's how you develop a consistent set of beliefs and don't end up with a compartmentalized, contradictory dogma (as frequently seen on the alt/far right).
There’s a lot of human history to provide those sort of opportunities to reflect. Even better, they provide a contextual grounding for you to actually grasp the significance of things like the violation of native sovereignty, the perils of colonial attitudes... you know real things. Not disjointed thought experiments that people like Sam Harris and Dave Rubin love to lose themselves in.
 

noob-noob

Member
Nov 1, 2017
70
Boston
I've made my point in this thread, at this point it's devolved into "so what the majority of natives want TMT, we should still respect the wishes of the vocal minority" 🙄

The only other point I want to make is the ridiculous shit posting by those against the telescope. They've called those that are arguing for it everything from racists and colonialists to White supremacists. All this kind of discourse does is destroy any kind of productive discussion and the fact that the moderating team is gleefully partaking in this kind of thinking is really sad.

Apparently the fact that I argue for the advancement of humanity through the sciences makes me a white colonialist, fuck me I guess the mirror has been lying to me all these years
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,679
So if enough people make that claim about any piece of land then people aren't supposed to build anything on it?That doesn't make any sense, especially considering other telescopes have already been built there.
Yeah that's more or less how land designation works. Just because existing telescopes were built doesn't mean the land adjacent to them are not still considered sacred. It's equivalent to building a telescope on half a christian cemetery and then being bewildered that anybody would have issue with developing the rest of the cemetery. You need something more than a telescope to help open your mind on these issues it seems.
 

Bronx-Man

Member
Oct 25, 2017
13,544
Wanting to expand our knowledge by building a giant telescope on a fucking volcano is textbook white settler colonial though?Man, gtfo with that shit.
When you have multiple people in here saying “It’s just a barren rock”, “They should be grateful”, “science > sacred land”, then yes that absolutely is colonial thought. The amount of disrespect shown to the people there ITT is staggering.
 
Nov 1, 2017
556
Is this a trick question? Based on the entirety of the available data.
So before you were saying that less than 30 percent of them were against it and making it seem like it didn't matter because they were a minority. It possibly being closer to 40 percent doesn't matter and the fact that the most recent survey would have prevented almost 1/4 of previous respondents from participating doesn't matter to you. It's also obvious obvious you didn't look at the 2016 data because it had a margin of error of over 4.9 percent for the total population and over 8 for native Hawaiians so that 46/45 split could have actually meant more were opposed. Also this:
Actually, it’s not clear. The recent poll I posted said that the majority of the natives don’t want it. I think there needs to be more data collected before we say either way.
The most accurate way to determine their level of support would be to actually ask them considering multiple surveys by different institutions have wildly different results over the last few years. I mean most of you in support won't care either way if they are opposed to it so the least that can be done is to actually get a proper reading of their thoughts.
 
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Middleman

Member
Jun 14, 2019
425
So before you were saying that less than 30 percent of them were against it and making it seem like it didn't matter because they were a minority. It possibly being closer to 40 percent doesn't matter and the fact that the most recent survey would have prevented almost 1/4 of previous respondents from participating doesn't matter to you. It's also obvious obvious you didn't look at the 2016 data because it had a margin of error of over 4.9 percent for the total population and over 8 for native Hawaiians so that 46/45 split could have actually meant more were opposed. Also this:

The most accurate way to determine their level of support would be to actually ask them considering multiple surveys by different institutions have wildly different results over the last few years. I mean most of you in support won't care either way if they are opposed to it so the least that can be done is to actually get a proper reading of their thoughts.
Stop.

The existence of a margin of error does not imply that all outcomes along that margin are equally likely.

Even if did, you'd then be arguing that it's equally possible that an even larger majority support the TMT, as it is that the majority is smaller than what the data suggests.

The possibility of a respondent selection bias does not imply the impact of that bias on the results.

Furthermore, I suggested that the data in its entirety supports the conclusion that a majority support it. A single poll suggesting that it might in fact be a larger minority opposed is what we call an outlier.

This is basic stats.
 

Dekim

Member
Oct 28, 2017
900
I am a bit shocked at the extreme disrespect towards the feelings of indigenous people here, especially this community where it suppose to be progressive and the scourge of colonialism is regularly talked about.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,200
Then don't frame the discussion of colonialism based solely on white people. As if the rest of us can't be racist or imperialist without them!
The term "colonialism" is a direct reference to the brutal European colonization of the world of the last 500 or so years that drives and shapes the current narrative of our politics and economics. How we define imperialism and racism is based on that context. Leveling it off by saying "everybody does it" essentially renders it meaningless as if history is irrelevant.
 
Nov 1, 2017
556
Stop.

The existence of a margin of error does not imply that all outcomes along that margin are equally likely.

Even if did, you'd then be arguing that it's equally possible that an even larger majority support the TMT, as it is that the majority is smaller than what the data suggests.

The possibility of a respondent selection bias does not imply the impact of that bias on the results.

Furthermore, I suggested that the data in its entirety supports the conclusion that a majority support it. A single poll suggesting that it might in fact be a larger minority opposed is what we call an outlier.

This is basic stats.
And I said before that you could have an even larger percentage of people in support based on the results from the 2018 poll which obviously transfers over to the 2016 as well. I was pointing that out because you were saying either way with the margin of error taken into consideration the majority of native Hawaiians were supportive. Again, the poll posted by Thordinson is more recent and shows that majority of native Hawaiians oppose it. Would you now say that that is accurate then?
 
Oct 25, 2017
6,316
I am a bit shocked at the extreme disrespect towards the feelings of indigenous people here, especially this community where it suppose to be progressive and the scourge of colonialism is regularly talked about.
Yeah, there were many times I've doubted how progressive this forum is, this thread being one of them.
This thread has gone 'mask off'.
 

Dongs Macabre

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,077
The term "colonialism" is a direct reference to the brutal European colonization of the world of the last 500 or so years that drives and shapes the current narrative of our politics and economics. How we define imperialism and racism is based on that context. Leveling it off by saying "everybody does it" essentially renders it meaningless as if history is irrelevant.
I'm not saying that "everybody does it". I'm saying that basing the discussion of colonial attitudes towards the native Hawaiians solely on historical context without consideration of the modern makeup of the group pushing for this telescope (multi-national and multi-cultural) shifts the blame off those of us who continue to contribute to it and perpetuate it. A local example: It's the same kind of sentiment that lets Asian-Canadians like me absolve themselves of guilt when faced with the reality of the First Nations people here in Canada. We're not the ones responsible for their historical oppression, so can we be at fault? But that ignores the continued apathy that allows it to continue.
 

Parthenios

The Fallen
Oct 28, 2017
3,416
There’s a lot of human history to provide those sort of opportunities to reflect. Even better, they provide a contextual grounding for you to actually grasp the significance of things like the violation of native sovereignty, the perils of colonial attitudes... you know real things. Not disjointed thought experiments that people like Sam Harris and Dave Rubin love to lose themselves in.
"Thought experiments" are an alt-right thing now, are they? That's disappointing.

And to be clear, I said the thread was interesting and made me think about things in ways I mostly hadn't before. I asked the same questions to the thread that I asked myself, thinking maybe it would spur interesting discussion:

What's the minimum number of people needed to stop a project beneficial to everyone (any search of "practical applications of astronomy" or similar show how beneficial the field is, so I didn't think that claim was contentious, especially on Era)? I personally think the answer is probably zero; even if there are no indigenous people remaining, the cultural importance of sites are still relevant to everyone else and should still be preserved. I suppose these become archaeological things at that point?

Can cultural heritage extend past physical landforms? I actually didn't make up my mind on this one and want to do more reading on the subject.

Would deference to locals extend past acts of preservation of cultural sites/areas to acts of destruction of cultural sites/areas? This is actually something that came up a lot in my economics classes, especially on the topic of ethics of globalization. It seems reasonable at first to try to get Brazil to not destroy the Amazon (since that's bad for basically everyone) but most of the people saying that come from countries that themselves have industrialized on the back of natural resources before the dangers of climate change were apparent. It's sometimes considered a form of "economic colonization" for developed nations to ask/demand developing nations to then bear the burden after the (mostly white) developed nations reaped all the benefits. This one is less of a cultural thing though so it's not as great a fit for this thread (but is something the thread caused me to think/read up on, which is why I mentioned it).
 

Televator

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,934
"Thought experiments" are an alt-right thing now, are they? That's disappointing.

And to be clear, I said the thread was interesting and made me think about things in ways I mostly hadn't before. I asked the same questions to the thread that I asked myself, thinking maybe it would spur interesting discussion:
Who said anything about the alt-right? Those guys are grifters who come up with pseudo intellectual talking points and sophistry to peddle their grift. They exercise in hypotheticals so they can avoid inconvenient context. Which happens to help funnel people towards an alt right trajectory under the guise “rationality”, but that’s not really their concern.

They do what they do on purpose though. Other people might do it sincerely unaware of the parallels, and I think it’s an exercise that’s not terribly productive or relevant at best.
 

McPaul

Member
May 6, 2019
625
Yeah that's more or less how land designation works. Just because existing telescopes were built doesn't mean the land adjacent to them are not still considered sacred. It's equivalent to building a telescope on half a christian cemetery and then being bewildered that anybody would have issue with developing the rest of the cemetery. You need something more than a telescope to help open your mind on these issues it seems.
Cemeteries get relocated all the time when new things need to get built.I doubt most christians would give a shit, especially when the thing being built is something that helps humanity.

When you have multiple people in here saying “It’s just a barren rock”, “They should be grateful”, “science > sacred land”, then yes that absolutely is colonial thought. The amount of disrespect shown to the people there ITT is staggering.
I'm not sure what you want people to say when in reality it is just a volcano and scients(from different continents) want to build a telescope there that would help us understand more about space.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,200
I'm not saying that "everybody does it". I'm saying that basing the discussion of colonial attitudes towards the native Hawaiians solely on historical context without consideration of the modern makeup of the group pushing for this telescope (multi-national and multi-cultural) shifts the blame off those of us who continue to contribute to it and perpetuate it. A local example: It's the same kind of sentiment that lets Asian-Canadians like me absolve themselves of guilt when faced with the reality of the First Nations people here in Canada. We're not the ones responsible for their historical oppression, so can we be at fault? But that ignores the continued apathy that allows it to continue.
I misunderstood your initial post. My apologies.

However, I think the point Slayven is making is still valid. It all stems from colonialism and the fact that other international players are involved doesn't change the fact that those players can't dictate what goes on that volcano without the permission of the government from the local city council to the federal agencies that hand out permits. Canada and China can give 2 billion dollars, but the federal, state, and local governments don't have to accept it. Ultimately, control is not in tribal hands.

But let's be frank: white people caused this problem through colonialism and as the demographic that holds all the power, is responsible for cleaning this mess up. The best we can do as fellow PoC is to stand in solidarity, amplify other marginalized voices, and use whatever privilege we have to do so. You're not wrong either, but I think we need to take a different path.
 

muteKi

Member
Oct 22, 2018
7,803
a sunken pirate ship
All "there are a dozen up there already" tells me is these people were ignored a dozen times before. It shouldn't matter if a lot more people want it there than not, especially when we're talking about a country where there's maybe half a million native Hawaiians (350'000 of which are mixed heritage) left out of a population three times that.
Once again for those in the back
 

weirder

Avenger
Oct 31, 2017
2,709
Momoa's participation is raising awareness and hopefully helps the other work being done to encourage Canadian universities to divest if protests continue.

University of Toronto made a statement on the TMT a few weeks back:
The University of Toronto does not condone the use of police force in furthering its research objectives. I have conveyed these views through ACURA, which represents the Canadian academic astronomy community in this project.
We know through our own Canadian experience that a commitment to Truth and Reconciliation impels us to consult and engage with Indigenous communities and to work collaboratively towards change. We must work to uphold those principles as we engage with Indigenous communities beyond our borders as well as within them.
http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/statement-on-the-thirty-meter-telescope-tmt/
 

Terminus

Member
Oct 30, 2017
1,852
However, I think the point Slayven is making is still valid. It all stems from colonialism and the fact that other international players are involved doesn't change the fact that those players can't dictate what goes on that volcano without the permission of the government from the local city council to the federal agencies that hand out permits. Canada and China can give 2 billion dollars, but the federal, state, and local governments don't have to accept it. Ultimately, control is not in tribal hands.
These have all signed off on it.

But let's be frank: white people caused this problem through colonialism and as the demographic that holds all the power, is responsible for cleaning this mess up. The best we can do as fellow PoC is to stand in solidarity, amplify other marginalized voices, and use whatever privilege we have to do so. You're not wrong either, but I think we need to take a different path.
White people did not cause this problem. Mauna Kea would remain the best place in the hemisphere to do astronomy regardless of the area’s history. If white people hadn’t come a-colonizing, the international astronomical community would still very much want to put telescopes up there.
 
Dec 5, 2018
1,296
White people did not cause this problem. Mauna Kea would remain the best place in the hemisphere to do astronomy regardless of the area’s history. If white people hadn’t come a-colonizing, the international astronomical community would still very much want to put telescopes up there.
And the local community would still very much want them to fuck off somewhere else.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,200
These have all signed off on it.



White people did not cause this problem. Mauna Kea would remain the best place in the hemisphere to do astronomy regardless of the area’s history. If white people hadn’t come a-colonizing, the international astronomical community would still very much want to put telescopes up there.
So? If the tribe controlled the island, they can tell those astronomers to fuck off. And you didn't refute my comment that the tribes weren't a part of the approval process. You think residents of gentrified neighborhoods consent to being gentrified?
 

Desparadina

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
214
"Those natives must be too stupid to understand how good this telescope would be on their historical and culturally important site, fuck trying to preserve it, they just dont't know what's good for them! /s"

That's how some of yall in this thread sound
 

firehawk12

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,892
Momoa's participation is raising awareness and hopefully helps the other work being done to encourage Canadian universities to divest if protests continue.

University of Toronto made a statement on the TMT a few weeks back:

http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/statement-on-the-thirty-meter-telescope-tmt/
Glad that UofT has a reasonable position on this. The fact that it’s for “science” doesn’t give someone carte Blanche to ignore these local concerns. It seems vile do to so when indigenous peoples have been victims for so long, unless you really don’t care about them and are happy wiping out their culture and heritage.
 

StargazerXL

Member
Jun 11, 2018
14
I think these discussions are healthy but some of the nuance in the current TMT situation is not being communicated.

The TMT project has been in the works for over 15 years, but Mauna Kea was selected as the site back in 2009. Since that time, it has undergone a rigorous environmental impact study and it worked extensively to accommodate the concerns of the local community. For example, the TMT construction site is not located on the exact summit of Mauna Kea, but at a position over a mile away to the NNE. Archeological studies have shown no previous cultural activity or burials at this location, and no species will be impacted by TMT's presence there. Also, the telescope enclosure will not be visible from lower elevations at that location. I believe it will also be painted to blend into the surroundings.

Mauna Kea is arguably the best astronomical observing location on Earth. It is a false equivalence to say it can be just moved to the Canary Islands. Moving TMT there would mean a lesser instrument, one that may not even warrant construction given the cost. Indeed, the weather on La Palma is poorer than on Mauna Kea, meaning fewer clear nights and worse image quality, and the lower elevation of La Palma means some projects, particularly studying exoplanets in the mid-infrared, will not be possible. Management of Mauna Kea has improved dramatically over the years that observatories have been there, with great deference and respect to native Hawaiian concerns. For example, all construction activities are accompanied by further activities to return any disturbed land to its natural state. This includes the decommissioning of telescopes, even TMT, in the future. Note also that the observatories are on public land, and their presence has not restricted access to the summit area to the public.

The native Hawaiians who are currently protesting have a right to do so. The protestors who were arrested were cited for illegally blocking a public road, not because they were protesting. The arrests were done on the third day of protest, after they were asked repeatedly to not block the road. Those who were arrested, especially the elders, were handled very respectfully and soon released - there was no violence. The arresting officers were from local police. The National Guard was called up, but not to interact with the protestors but instead to provide logistical support to the local police effort.

Though Hawaii has had an unfortunate history where native concerns have not been considered by those in power (to put it mildly), the TMT project has tried to work differently. It recognized from the very beginning that native community engagement is important. For example, TMT will be funding the THINK program, providing up to $1M / year to support education within the local community. In addition, it has begun a Workforce Pipeline Program to steer Hawaiians into science and technology jobs. I believe it is also the aim of the project to staff the facility with locals. The project will be an economic benefit to the local community.

TMT followed the rules laid down by the State of Hawaii, including affirmation of its building permit by the Hawaii Supreme Court. It has not acted unilaterally in its development without regard to native concerns. Hopefully, the project will continue to engage with the protestors to communicate its net benefits to Hawaii and its native community. The project and its international backers, however, can only do so much. Ultimately, it will be up to Hawaiians themselves to decide if the project will go forward there.

For further details on the TMT project, see http://www.maunakeaandtmt.org.
 
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noob-noob

Member
Nov 1, 2017
70
Boston
I think these discussions are healthy but some of the nuance in the current TMT situation is not being communicated.

The TMT project has been in the works for over 15 years, but Mauna Kea was selected as the site back in 2009. Since that time, it has undergone a rigorous environmental impact study and it worked extensively to accommodate the concerns of the local community. For example, the TMT construction site is not located on the exact summit of Mauna Kea, but at a position over a mile away to the NNE. Archeological studies have shown no previous cultural activity or burials at this location, and no species will be impacted by TMT's presence there. Also, the telescope enclosure will not be visible from lower elevations at that location. I believe it will also be painted to blend into the surroundings.

Mauna Kea is arguably the best astronomical observing location on Earth. It is a false equivalence to say it can be just moved to the Canary Islands. Moving TMT there would mean a lesser instrument, one that may not even warrant construction given the cost. Indeed, the weather on La Palma is poorer than on Mauna Kea, meaning fewer clear nights and worse image quality, and the lower elevation of La Palma means some projects, particularly studying exoplanets in the mid-infrared, will not be possible. Management of Mauna Kea has improved dramatically over the years that observatories have been there, with great deference and respect to native Hawaiian concerns. For example, all construction activities are accompanied by further activities to return any disturbed land to its natural state. This includes the decommissioning of telescopes, even TMT, in the future. Note also that the observatories are on public land, and their presence has not restricted access to the summit area to the public.

The native Hawaiians who are currently protesting have a right to do so. The protestors who were arrested were cited for illegally blocking a public road, not because they were protesting. The arrests were done on the third day of protest, after they were asked repeatedly to not block the road. Those who were arrested, especially the elders, were handled very respectfully and soon released - there was no violence. The arresting officers were from local police. The National Guard was called up, but not to interact with the protestors but instead to provide logistical support to the local police effort.

Though Hawaii has had an unfortunate history where native concerns have not been considered by those in power (to put it mildly), the TMT project has tried to work differently. It recognized from the very beginning that native community engagement is important. For example, TMT will be funding the THINK program, providing up to $1M / year to support education within the local community. In addition, it has begun a Workforce Pipeline Program to steer Hawaiians into science and technology jobs. I believe it is also the aim of the project to staff the facility with locals. The project will be an economic benefit to the local community.

TMT followed the rules laid down by the State of Hawaii, including affirmation of its building permit by the Hawaii Supreme Court. It has not acted unilaterally in its development without regard to native concerns. Hopefully, the project will continue to engage with the protestors to communicate its net benefits to Hawaii and its native community. The project and its international backers, however, can only do so much. Ultimately, it will be up to Hawaiians themselves to decide if the project will go forward there.

For further details on the TMT project, see http://www.maunakeaandtmt.org.
This is a beautiful post, thank you for taking the time to write all this out.

Unfortunately I think a lot of posters in this thread already have their mind made up because of some misguided sense of righteousness.
 

LastCaress

Avenger
Oct 29, 2017
767
I think these discussions are healthy but some of the nuance in the current TMT situation is not being communicated.

The TMT project has been in the works for over 15 years, but Mauna Kea was selected as the site back in 2009. Since that time, it has undergone a rigorous environmental impact study and it worked extensively to accommodate the concerns of the local community. For example, the TMT construction site is not located on the exact summit of Mauna Kea, but at a position over a mile away to the NNE. Archeological studies have shown no previous cultural activity or burials at this location, and no species will be impacted by TMT's presence there. Also, the telescope enclosure will not be visible from lower elevations at that location. I believe it will also be painted to blend into the surroundings.

Mauna Kea is arguably the best astronomical observing location on Earth. It is a false equivalence to say it can be just moved to the Canary Islands. Moving TMT there would mean a lesser instrument, one that may not even warrant construction given the cost. Indeed, the weather on La Palma is poorer than on Mauna Kea, meaning fewer clear nights and worse image quality, and the lower elevation of La Palma means some projects, particularly studying exoplanets in the mid-infrared, will not be possible. Management of Mauna Kea has improved dramatically over the years that observatories have been there, with great deference and respect to native Hawaiian concerns. For example, all construction activities are accompanied by further activities to return any disturbed land to its natural state. This includes the decommissioning of telescopes, even TMT, in the future. Note also that the observatories are on public land, and their presence has not restricted access to the summit area to the public.

The native Hawaiians who are currently protesting have a right to do so. The protestors who were arrested were cited for illegally blocking a public road, not because they were protesting. The arrests were done on the third day of protest, after they were asked repeatedly to not block the road. Those who were arrested, especially the elders, were handled very respectfully and soon released - there was no violence. The arresting officers were from local police. The National Guard was called up, but not to interact with the protestors but instead to provide logistical support to the local police effort.

Though Hawaii has had an unfortunate history where native concerns have not been considered by those in power (to put it mildly), the TMT project has tried to work differently. It recognized from the very beginning that native community engagement is important. For example, TMT will be funding the THINK program, providing up to $1M / year to support education within the local community. In addition, it has begun a Workforce Pipeline Program to steer Hawaiians into science and technology jobs. I believe it is also the aim of the project to staff the facility with locals. The project will be an economic benefit to the local community.

TMT followed the rules laid down by the State of Hawaii, including affirmation of its building permit by the Hawaii Supreme Court. It has not acted unilaterally in its development without regard to native concerns. Hopefully, the project will continue to engage with the protestors to communicate its net benefits to Hawaii and its native community. The project and its international backers, however, can only do so much. Ultimately, it will be up to Hawaiians themselves to decide if the project will go forward there.

For further details on the TMT project, see http://www.maunakeaandtmt.org.
Thank you for this information! I will look into that site to learn more about the project.
 

Middleman

Member
Jun 14, 2019
425
I think these discussions are healthy but some of the nuance in the current TMT situation is not being communicated.

The TMT project has been in the works for over 15 years, but Mauna Kea was selected as the site back in 2009. Since that time, it has undergone a rigorous environmental impact study and it worked extensively to accommodate the concerns of the local community. For example, the TMT construction site is not located on the exact summit of Mauna Kea, but at a position over a mile away to the NNE. Archeological studies have shown no previous cultural activity or burials at this location, and no species will be impacted by TMT's presence there. Also, the telescope enclosure will not be visible from lower elevations at that location. I believe it will also be painted to blend into the surroundings.

Mauna Kea is arguably the best astronomical observing location on Earth. It is a false equivalence to say it can be just moved to the Canary Islands. Moving TMT there would mean a lesser instrument, one that may not even warrant construction given the cost. Indeed, the weather on La Palma is poorer than on Mauna Kea, meaning fewer clear nights and worse image quality, and the lower elevation of La Palma means some projects, particularly studying exoplanets in the mid-infrared, will not be possible. Management of Mauna Kea has improved dramatically over the years that observatories have been there, with great deference and respect to native Hawaiian concerns. For example, all construction activities are accompanied by further activities to return any disturbed land to its natural state. This includes the decommissioning of telescopes, even TMT, in the future. Note also that the observatories are on public land, and their presence has not restricted access to the summit area to the public.

The native Hawaiians who are currently protesting have a right to do so. The protestors who were arrested were cited for illegally blocking a public road, not because they were protesting. The arrests were done on the third day of protest, after they were asked repeatedly to not block the road. Those who were arrested, especially the elders, were handled very respectfully and soon released - there was no violence. The arresting officers were from local police. The National Guard was called up, but not to interact with the protestors but instead to provide logistical support to the local police effort.

Though Hawaii has had an unfortunate history where native concerns have not been considered by those in power (to put it mildly), the TMT project has tried to work differently. It recognized from the very beginning that native community engagement is important. For example, TMT will be funding the THINK program, providing up to $1M / year to support education within the local community. In addition, it has begun a Workforce Pipeline Program to steer Hawaiians into science and technology jobs. I believe it is also the aim of the project to staff the facility with locals. The project will be an economic benefit to the local community.

TMT followed the rules laid down by the State of Hawaii, including affirmation of its building permit by the Hawaii Supreme Court. It has not acted unilaterally in its development without regard to native concerns. Hopefully, the project will continue to engage with the protestors to communicate its net benefits to Hawaii and its native community. The project and its international backers, however, can only do so much. Ultimately, it will be up to Hawaiians themselves to decide if the project will go forward there.

For further details on the TMT project, see http://www.maunakeaandtmt.org.
Great post.