Male Body Image in Modern Television and Film

GC-

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,505
I mean, I’ve seen and done PPL routines before. But only hitting muscle groups once a week isn’t particularly effective. You don’t need a week of rest for muscles.
Beginners don’t need to plus they aren’t hitting them only once a week. They hit them hard once a week then in supporting roles on the others. For example: A bench press and a pull up are done on different days but both use the arms, shoulders, chest and back but each have a different focus.

It’s only when you get to intermediate workouts and out of easy progression that you want to fully hit muscle groups more than once a week. It’s setting people up for success and quick development not for failure and fatigue.
 
Nov 17, 2017
6,186
This ain't about the steroids thing, chief. It's about how coming into a thread like this and saying "I'm totally ripped and you can be me too!" doesn't help at all. By continuing to insist that anyone can have a body like the ones in the OP if they just 'stopped being lazy' (which is the insinuation here) both you and him come across as lacking empathy for those who aren't as fit as yourselves, and in a thread about harmful perspectives on body image that simply isn't needed in my eyes. As I said before, it's missing the point at best and actively harmful at worst.
I don’t think you’re going to get through. Unfortunately a lot of the male body image mindset is plagued with ego. You would never see these types of posts with women and female body image. You wouldn’t have women saying how easy it is for them to be really fit while flexing their workout routines and how much encyclopedic knowledge they have on training. I think because they’re generally better at reading the room and being empathetic.

I think the problem with men is that we push the body before the mind. “Get ripped like this and then you’ll feel good about yourself.” Cold logic before feelings. But we should focus on feeling good about ourselves and our bodies before pursuing this type of fitness because otherwise we are polluting our motivations. Body dysmorphia is not a physical problem, it’s a psychological one. But it’s clear many don’t realize this when their first response is throw down science on fitness and the body. Unfortunately, I think as a gender we have a long way to go before we can truly learn empathy when it comes to this sort of thing.
 

Raonak

Member
Oct 29, 2017
808
It's completely unrealistic for normal people to obtain these media bodies unless you're genetically gifted, or rejuggle your whole life around fitness.

For the rest of us, just learn to accept who you are.
everybody has their "specialty" not everybody needs to look like that, in the same way not everybody needs to be a intellectual genius.

Getting a ripped body is super obtainable... but so is the unlimited amounts of other skills you could also learn.
you could become an expert in a topic, learn to cook, learn multiple languages, learn to build something, learn programming, watch all of one piece, etc.
We only have a short time on this earth, so don't let bullshit like the media force you into investing your time in shit you don't want to do.
Find your passion and do that instead. And if your passion is your body, then more power to you.

Find the thing that makes you happy.
 
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Plum

The Fallen
May 31, 2018
6,318
It’s probably good then that he didn’t do this. Like, quit ignoring that to force a point.
Then what did he mean by these posts:

They’re natural obtainable, barring your natural body composition (ecto, endo, or meso)

The people alluding to substance enhance irk me because I’m athletic, heathy diet (vegan), have a decent physique, in my opinion better than some of those posted, and I have NEVER touched an enhancement drug. Furthermore, my lifestyle outside of eating healthy and hitting the gym isn’t much difference from the average. so that “people with normal lifestyle” shit is a bit bothersome too.
Because saying that those bodies are "naturally obtainable," and that people with 100% 'normal' lifestyles can obtain them is exactly that.

But let's ignore him because you literally say it anyway:
This just comes across as being upset that someone is enjoying the results of doing something that other people are totally capable of doing (with varying degrees of success and difficulty, obviously).
It not being easy doesn’t mean he did anything “average” (whatever that means in this context) people aren’t totally capable of also doing.
 

Siggy-P

Avenger
Mar 18, 2018
4,976
Most people with athletics bodies are NOT and have NEVER taken enhancement supplements. If we’re speaking of entertainers, to include professional athletes the probability is higher. Still, it’s not as common as assumed, especially with the physiques of the actors I’ve seen posted; They’re natural obtainable, barring your natural body composition (ecto, endo, or meso)

The people alluding to substance enhance irk me because I’m athletic, heathy diet (vegan), have a decent physique, in my opinion better than some of those posted, and I have NEVER touched an enhancement drug. Furthermore, my lifestyle outside of eating healthy and hitting the gym isn’t much difference from the average. so that “people with normal lifestyle” shit is a bit bothersome too.
The lifestyle stuff is more that it takes a commitment of like 2-3 hours a day that can tire you out.

That's what people may mean when they say it's not attainable for everyone. Not that it's phsyically not possible but rather not everyone has the time or opportunity because of other commitments/expenses.
 

GC-

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,505
I don’t think you’re going to get through. Unfortunately a lot of the male body image mindset is plagued with ego. You would never see these types of posts with women and female body image. You wouldn’t have women saying how easy it is for them to be really fit while flexing their workout routines and how much encyclopedic knowledge they have on training. I think because they’re generally better at reading the room and being empathetic.

I think the problem with men is that we push the body before the mind. “Get ripped like this and then you’ll feel good about yourself.” Cold logic before feelings. But we should focus on feeling good about ourselves and our bodies before pursuing this type of fitness because otherwise we are polluting our motivations. Body dysmorphia is not a physical problem, it’s a psychological one. But it’s clear many don’t realize this when their first response is throw down science on fitness and the body. Unfortunately, I think as a gender we have a long way to go before we can truly learn empathy when it comes to this sort of thing.
Probably not on this board but women have had the body issue thing way harsher than anything men have had and the criticism are usually coming from women not men and are ruthless compared to anything that has been written in here. Go look at some of the messages curve models on Instagram get and see what they have to deal with. It’s really vile stuff.
 
Nov 17, 2017
6,186
Probably not on this board but women have had the body issue thing way harsher than anything men have had and the criticism are usually coming from women not men and are ruthless compared to anything that has been written in here. Go look at some of the messages curve models on Instagram get and see what they have to deal with. It’s really vile stuff.
I’m sure there are exceptions but in general woman are much better about this. My point is that women are way ahead of the curve with properly talking about this sort of thing in a healthy supportive way than us men are. And yes, that is partly because they have had to deal with body issues far longer and harsher than men. That doesn’t erase the fact that as men, we have a huge problem with toxic masculinity and it colors how we talk about body image with each other.
 

ZackieChan

Member
Oct 27, 2017
4,593
Beginners don’t need to plus they aren’t hitting them only once a week. They hit them hard once a week then in supporting roles on the others. For example: A bench press and a pull up are done on different days but both use the arms, shoulders, chest and back but each have a different focus.

It’s only when you get to intermediate workouts and out of easy progression that you want to fully hit muscle groups more than once a week. It’s setting people up for success and quick development not for failure and fatigue.
Gotcha. I always read that for beginners who are just working out a few days a week, a full body routine is best. But I’m no pro!
 

Yasuke

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
11,321
Then what did he mean by these posts:



Because saying that those bodies are "naturally obtainable," and that people with 100% 'normal' lifestyles can obtain them is exactly that.

But let's ignore him because you literally say it anyway:
You’re insisting we’re saying something that we aren’t.

It’s wild to repeatedly conflate the very clear English we’re typing in, as well as the clear concessions we both make to people with different health/life situations, as “ANY AND EVERY BODY CAN AND SHOULD DO THIS, IF YOU HAVEN’T IT’S YOUR BAD, FULL STOP”.

I empathize with people struggling with body issues, as I do as well. But insisting that anyone who suggests a realistic idea of what is and isn’t doable with a bit of work and discipline is just shitting on people is off-base.
 

Zoe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,527
I empathize with people struggling with body issues, as I do as well. But insisting that anyone who suggests a realistic idea of what is and isn’t doable with a bit of work and discipline is just shitting on people is off-base.
"A bit". Do you realize how loaded that way of talking is?
 

Yasuke

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
11,321
"A bit". Do you realize how loaded that way of talking is?
I should really stress i don’t think most people can reach Marvel hero status with “a bit” of work. I’ve already said as much.

But some of y’all have talked y’all selves into believing going to the gym 3+ times a week or so is incompatible with a “normal” lifestyle, which strikes me as just as harmful as people who body-shame. It’s just totally dishonest and doesn’t actually help anybody either.
 

aSniperJones

Member
Oct 26, 2017
187
District of Columbia
I should really stress i don’t think most people can reach Marvel hero status with “a bit” of work. I’ve already said as much.

But some of y’all have talked y’all selves into believing going to the gym 3+ times a week or so is incompatible with a “normal” lifestyle, which strikes me as just as harmful as people who body-shame. It’s just totally dishonest and doesn’t actually help anybody either.
this.
 

Bruceleeroy

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,752
Orange County
I don’t think you’re going to get through. Unfortunately a lot of the male body image mindset is plagued with ego. You would never see these types of posts with women and female body image. You wouldn’t have women saying how easy it is for them to be really fit while flexing their workout routines and how much encyclopedic knowledge they have on training. I think because they’re generally better at reading the room and being empathetic.

I think the problem with men is that we push the body before the mind. “Get ripped like this and then you’ll feel good about yourself.” Cold logic before feelings. But we should focus on feeling good about ourselves and our bodies before pursuing this type of fitness because otherwise we are polluting our motivations. Body dysmorphia is not a physical problem, it’s a psychological one. But it’s clear many don’t realize this when their first response is throw down science on fitness and the body. Unfortunately, I think as a gender we have a long way to go before we can truly learn empathy when it comes to this sort of thing.
That's a great post and I couldn't agree more
 

Bruceleeroy

Member
Oct 26, 2017
1,752
Orange County
The lifestyle stuff is more that it takes a commitment of like 2-3 hours a day that can tire you out.

That's what people may mean when they say it's not attainable for everyone. Not that it's phsyically not possible but rather not everyone has the time or opportunity because of other commitments/expenses.
It takes 30-45 min 3-4 days a week and a relatively strict diet
 

RustyNails

Member
Oct 26, 2017
8,626
I think we need to distinguish between dudes and dudebros. Dudes are what you see on TV like Friends, silicon valley, big bang theory, Always Sunny, etc. To show them as swole would be evoking comedy. Then you have dudebros who are oh so serious and always find the right opportunity to show off their assets. There's in between that won't fit in the body discussion.
 

Agar25

Member
Apr 12, 2018
3,635
Posts in this thread are why I never talk about the gym or working out. Or have workout pics all over social media. It’s hard enough as a gay man in LA to deal with body issues without me shrugging off others qualms because “ well I did it” . It’s so fucking vapid , so often lacking in empathy. I just can’t. Anecdotal of course but I have never once met a top tier athlete or body that was 100% “natty” especially as they get up there in age. It just isn’t possible.

And yes the biggest thing people don’t buy about complete body transformations is the speed at which they do it. The amount some of these actors have to train, the punishment you have to put your body through... you have to recover from that daily and FOHHHHH if you think most people are doing that “ naturally”.

If you’re in shape good for you. Look around and see how “ average “ so many other people look and be happy and humble with your physical success instead of having to whip out your fitness dick any chance you get. Then again humble doesn’t = likes, right swipes, free drinks, and on an on. Stupid superficial society ( I say this as a decently “fit” person) we live in.
 

Aprikurt

Member
Oct 29, 2017
4,584
If you’re going to the gym 3+ times a week and eating relatively well, you’re “fitter” than most people anyways.
 
Nov 17, 2017
6,186
I should really stress i don’t think most people can reach Marvel hero status with “a bit” of work. I’ve already said as much.

But some of y’all have talked y’all selves into believing going to the gym 3+ times a week or so is incompatible with a “normal” lifestyle, which strikes me as just as harmful as people who body-shame. It’s just totally dishonest and doesn’t actually help anybody either.
Honestly, if you go to the gym 3+ times a week, you’re not doing what the average person does. You’re doing above average. In fact if you’re doing that consistently you’re a gym hobbyist. Going to the gym that much is a life style change, which is what’s required to get that celebrity body.

I think it’s silly to expect everyone to be able to go to the gym 3+ times a week. Not everyone has the time for it. And even if they do, they may lack the proper diet or the genetics, or they aren’t doing workouts with perfect form and efficiency to get that toned, ripped body. And it might frustrate them every time they go to the gym, see a guy buffer than them or just look in the mirror that they are not ripped enough, not attractive enough, not worth enough. And so when someone is feeling like this telling them how easy it is for you to be really fit is probably reading the room horribly.

And the problem with many of the responses here is people want to brag about how easily they can achieve ideal body types or how best to achieve ideal body types or what exactly is required to achieve ideal body types. That’s not helping people with body image issues because the problem comes not from their body but their mind. Going on about how you can easily get this body type is just telling them that “yes, everything you thought about what your body should be is true.” We should be telling people they don’t need to be buff. Be as in shape as you need to for your health. Everything else is just vanity.

I say this as someone who goes to the gym at least 3 times a week.

People should more focus on building muscle before getting "ripped".
I think people should focus on being happy with their bodies and theirselves before chasing after body goals often set by Hollywood and instagram influencers.
 

Yasuke

Banned
Oct 25, 2017
11,321
Honestly, if you go to the gym 3+ times a week, you’re not doing what the average person does. You’re doing above average. In fact if you’re doing that consistently you’re a gym hobbyist. Going to the gym that much is a life style change, which is what’s required to get that celebrity body.

I think it’s silly to expect everyone to be able to go to the gym 3+ times a week. Not everyone has the time for it. And even if they do, they may lack the proper diet or the genetics, or they aren’t doing workouts with perfect form and efficiency to get that toned, ripped body. And it might frustrate them every time they go to the gym, see a guy buffer than them or just look in the mirror that they are not ripped enough, not attractive enough, not worth enough. And so when someone is feeling like this telling them how easy it is for you to be really fit is probably reading the room horribly.

And the problem with many of the responses here is people want to brag about how easily they can achieve ideal body types or how best to achieve ideal body types or what exactly is required to achieve ideal body types. That’s not helping people with body image issues because the problem comes not from their body but their mind. Going on about how you can easily get this body type is just telling them that “yes, everything you thought about what your body should be is true.” We should be telling people they don’t need to be buff. Be as in shape as you need to for your health. Everything else is just vanity.

I say this as someone who goes to the gym at least 3 times a week.
Nobody here is arguing that going to the gym 3 or more times a week is the norm.

We’re saying you can go to the gym 3 or more times a week if you have a regular ass lifestyle (full-time job, rich social life, some kids) outside of that.

We never even said it was easy, we just said it was wholly compatible with an average lifestyle. And it is. Claiming otherwise is being dishonest and isn’t actually helping anyone.

Being fit should always be solely about what makes you feel good in your body, which shouldn’t be skewed by what the outside world is telling you you should look like.

I’m well aware my genes as far as fitness goes are sitting well north of the vast majority of the population, as I’ve stated here many times. Nobody should be modeling their fitness goals after my own because I’m almost guaranteed to be able to get further, faster than they are.

And still, I struggle with body image. It never really stops for anybody, which is a testament to how unhealthily programmed we are to reach an ideal that almost nobody needs to be at to be happy.

That conversation should be completely divorced from the reality that being fit as hell still isn’t some unattainable barrier for most people. Me saying “you shouldn’t assume you couldn’t reach that goal with the right diet and training” is not me passing judgement on anyone who could, but doesn’t care enough to. Most people don’t care enough to reach “Marvel hero” status, including a large percentage of said heroes who just do it because it’s part of their job description.

We’ve all got our priorities, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with someone prioritizing other aspects of their lives over looking like Thor.
 
Oct 27, 2017
304
RDreamer. Reading this thread it seems that this aesthetic is already internalised.

For me there is a difference in how your body looks as a result of an active lifestyle and a varied diet and training your body in combination with a more strict diet to achieve a certain aesthetic. It becomes a little weird or problematic when characters who don’t even have an active lifestyle end up with the kind of body that is most likely the result of dedicated training.

I look at this issue from a female perspective and see a parallel with the post pregnancy belly. There you have celebrities applauded for the fact that there is no visible trace of the pregnancy six weeks after giving birth. While most new mothers were struggling to adjust to the new life rhythm and figuring out how you keep the baby alive there now is the added stress of having to shed the pregnancy weight as soon as possible. And your belly should look as if it never even was inhabited (no stretch marks or saggy skin). Because all celebrity X did was a daily massage with some oil, eating salads and some exercise. Just takes a bit of effort.
 

DvdGzz

Member
Mar 21, 2018
956
It takes work but I definitely don't spend hours a day in the gym. My wife and I go for 45 min to 1 hour and 15 minutes. 5-6 days a week. It's the counting calories and making sure my protein is high that is the harder part. I love to lift.

The drug claims get thrown around based off the time frame the transformation happens. A lot of these physiques are attainable natty, just how quick they achieve them raises eyebrows.
Bingo. Also, muscle memory is a thing and it's amazing. When I detrain and get fat I can bounce back in 3-6 months and the difference is insane.
 
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GC-

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,505
Gotcha. I always read that for beginners who are just working out a few days a week, a full body routine is best. But I’m no pro!
Neither am I. A TB is recommended as well, loads are it all depends on what you are trying to achieve and what are the realities of your lifestyle. A TB is more in line with what many think lifters do in terms of time at the gym others are nowhere near as demanding, a big reason why people choose that when starting out is that they know they will miss days. It’s why I chose that, but it’s far harder and I never missed a day and wasted a lot of time when I could have taken advantage of being a beginner more.
 

DvdGzz

Member
Mar 21, 2018
956
I've lifted for going on 20 years and I love full body routines 5-6 times a week. I choose 2 leg exercises and 3-4 upper body movements and do 3-4 sets of each. At my level, I have to do drop sets or myoreps to really tear the muscle if I want to improve at all. It happens at a snails pace but I love it so whatever.
 

Anabolex

Member
Mar 23, 2018
220
It's weird that threads about male body image always turns in to flexing threads and lifting advice.
Would you prefer people crying about how life is unfair and X and Y are unobtainable? If you want to look a certain way you have to invest time and effort and people here are offering advice how to achieve this goal. People who don't want to put in the effort simply don't want it enough and that is fine.
 

Siggy-P

Avenger
Mar 18, 2018
4,976
Would you prefer people crying about how life is unfair and X and Y are unobtainable? If you want to look a certain way you have to invest time and effort and people here are offering advice how to achieve this goal. People who don't want to put in the effort simply don't want it enough and that is fine.
This thread is about how media is pushing bodies that take time and effort as the norm. People who go the gym near-daily and committing to "strict diets" to sue their own words downplaying that commitment ain't helping.
 

DvdGzz

Member
Mar 21, 2018
956
This guy. It would be weird for it to have things that have no relation to the topic. If a gaming, married, busy father of 2 can do it, anyone can. Nothing weird about talking about how it's done. Like Anabolex advised, if you want it you can have it. If not, don't worry about it. Being in top physical shape has always been sought after. People admire it and it can motivate them to achieve it.
 

Anabolex

Member
Mar 23, 2018
220
This thread is about how media is pushing bodies that take time and effort as the norm. People who go the gym near-daily and committing to "strict diets" to sue their own words downplaying that commitment ain't helping.
I agree that it isn't the norm and 99% of men you see on the street don't look like this which should be enough to realize this. If some men feel insecure about their bodies it is on them to do something about it.
 

Hjod

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
3,003
Behind my desk.
Would you prefer people crying about how life is unfair and X and Y are unobtainable? If you want to look a certain way you have to invest time and effort and people here are offering advice how to achieve this goal. People who don't want to put in the effort simply don't want it enough and that is fine.
No? I would prefer the topic would be discussed, it started out with OP talking about how unrealistic media potrays the male physiqe, like OPs exampel, a depressed, alcoholic sheriff who looks like he works out quite a bit. That's was what was being discussed for five minutes before people arrived and started humble bragging.

And to the bolded, it's a tad more nuanced than that.

This guy. It would be weird for it to have things that have no relation to the topic. If a gaming, married, busy father of 2 can do it, anyone can. Nothing weird about talking about how it's done. Like Anabolex advised, if you want it you can have it. If not, don't worry about it. Being in top physical shape has always been sought after. People admire it and it can motivate them to achieve it.
I don't know if this was directed at me but I'll asume it is.

No, not anyone can, there are a lot of reasons that people can't. And you say that one shouldn't worry about it if one doesn't have the "drive" or what ever are keeping 40% of the population obese. I guess they're just missing the fortitude or some bullshit.

And you know it's more about looking "ripped" and "swole". Being muscle bound is not being in top physical shape.
 

Siggy-P

Avenger
Mar 18, 2018
4,976
I agree that it isn't the norm and 99% of men you see on the street don't look like this which should be enough to realize this. If some men feel insecure about their bodies it is on them to do something about it.
This thread is not about men being insecure with their bodies. It's about the bolded.
 

Thorn

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,746
It's weird that threads about male body image always turns in to flexing threads and lifting advice.
Its frustrating as hell as someone fighting pop addiction and a bad diet. I've been going to the gym but I have gained 20 pounds since 2016.

Seeing all the "its so easy!" is depressing.
 

DvdGzz

Member
Mar 21, 2018
956
I don't know if this was directed at me but I'll asume it is.

No, not anyone can, there are a lot of reasons that people can't. And you say that one shouldn't worry about it if one doesn't have the "drive" or what ever are keeping 40% of the population obese. I guess they're just missing the fortitude or some bullshit.

And you know it's more about looking "ripped" and "swole". Being muscle bound is not being in top physical shape.
The ease of modern living and easy to overeat foods are keeping people from it. Anything else would be super rare if you're insinuating some disease or disability.

Don't let angles fool you, I'm only 187 pounds, nowhere near someone like The Rock who is 250. Also, it would be a matter of opinion. I'd say he is in top shape for what he is going for.

Its frustrating as hell as someone fighting pop addiction and a bad diet. I've been going to the gym but I have gained 20 pounds since 2016.

Seeing all the "its so easy!" is depressing.
It DEFINITELY isn't easy. I struggled for many years before finding what worked for me. I started in 1999 and just got into the shape I am in my avatar in the last couple of years. I do flexible dieting where I am allowed pizza, ice cream, etc. It took a while to be able to moderate those foods but I found it much easier than sticking to only healthy foods. I got used to diet coke early on. Drinking calories is one of the easiest ways to overconsume energy.

You can't just look at someone who is in shape and think they had/have it easy. I fought every step of the way and have to keep fighting to maintain it.
 
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Anabolex

Member
Mar 23, 2018
220
No? I would prefer the topic would be discussed, it started out with OP talking about how unrealistic media potrays the male physiqe, like OPs exampel, a depressed, alcoholic sheriff who looks like he works out quite a bit. That's was what was being discussed for five minutes before people arrived and started humble bragging.

And to the bolded, it's a tad more nuanced than that.
While I think that it is unlikely that a depressed alcoholic works out alot I don't think it is unrealistic.

Also I don't believe that it is more nuanced than this at all. There is only one person I have met that legitimately couldn't get in shape because of a physical condition. She was a nurse with two kids who still found the time to workout every other day and eat healthy.
 

Hjod

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
3,003
Behind my desk.
The ease of modern living and easy to overeat foods are keeping people from it. Anything else would be super rare if you're insinuating some disease or disability.

Don't let angles fool you, I'm only 187 pounds, nowhere near someone like The Rock who is 250. Also, it would be a matter of opinion. I'd say he is in top shape for what he is going for.
That's part of the problem, sure. But there are so many other factors that goes in to it. You're not the norm, you're in the minority if you even go to the gym 3 days a week. So why are we trying to push this image that dudes look like they go to the gym 6 days a week irregardles of what role they are playing?

I wasn't talking about you. The Rock is very big, yes. But that's about it.

While I think that it is unlikely that a depressed alcoholic works out alot I don't think it is unrealistic.

Also I don't believe that it is more nuanced than this at all. There is only one person I have met that legitimately couldn't get in shape because of a physical condition. She was a nurse with two kids who still found the time to workout every other day and eat healthy.
So you don't think it's unrealistic that an alcoholic would work out 4-5 days a week, be on top of his diet and keep up on his cardio?

There are ton of factors that are keeping people from getting in to shape. It's not as easy as do X get Y results.
 
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Siggy-P

Avenger
Mar 18, 2018
4,976
It DEFINITELY isn't easy. I struggled for many years before finding what worked for me. I started in 1999 and just got into the shape I am in my avatar in the last couple of years. I do flexible dieting where I am allowed pizza, ice cream, etc. It took a while to be able to moderate those foods but I found it much easier than sticking to only healthy foods. I got used to diet coke early on. Drinking calories is one of the easiest ways to overconsume energy.
Right, so to be clear, the thread isn't about whether or not these bodies are realsitically attainable. Rather it's about the fact that a body type you describe to have struggled with getting is being commonly presented as the norm.

Whether you think it is attainable for someone is irrelevant. Most people aren't going to get that sort of body. Down on their luck alcoholic characters who are presented as doi g nothing but just sitting around all day especially.
 

Red Liquorice

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,151
UK
I don’t think you’re going to get through. Unfortunately a lot of the male body image mindset is plagued with ego. You would never see these types of posts with women and female body image. You wouldn’t have women saying how easy it is for them to be really fit while flexing their workout routines and how much encyclopedic knowledge they have on training. I think because they’re generally better at reading the room and being empathetic.

I think the problem with men is that we push the body before the mind. “Get ripped like this and then you’ll feel good about yourself.” Cold logic before feelings. But we should focus on feeling good about ourselves and our bodies before pursuing this type of fitness because otherwise we are polluting our motivations. Body dysmorphia is not a physical problem, it’s a psychological one. But it’s clear many don’t realize this when their first response is throw down science on fitness and the body. Unfortunately, I think as a gender we have a long way to go before we can truly learn empathy when it comes to this sort of thing.
Quoting in hope more people read this.
 

Thorn

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,746
It DEFINITELY isn't easy. I struggled for many years before finding what worked for me. I started in 1999 and just got into the shape I am in my avatar in the last couple of years. I do flexible dieting where I am allowed pizza, ice cream, etc. It took a while to be able to moderate those foods but I found it much easier than sticking to only healthy foods. I got used to diet coke early on. Drinking calories is one of the easiest ways to overconsume energy.

You can't just look at someone who is in shape and think they had/have it easy. I fought every step of the way and have to keep fighting to maintain it.
Oh don't get me wrong, I know it's not easy. Just frustrating when it feels some make it out to be.
 

DvdGzz

Member
Mar 21, 2018
956
That's part of the problem, sure. But there are so many other factors that goes in to it. You're not the norm, you're in the minority if you even go to the gym 3 days a week. So why are we trying to push this image that dudes look like they go to the gym 6 days a week irregardles of what role they are playing?

I wasn't talking about you. The Rock is very big, yes. But that's about it.
Oh, I totally agree with the thread topic but it's the same for women, it just became a thing for men as well in the last decade or two. Females have dealt with this for a loooong time. But yeah, even in that Birdbox movie on Netflix, the dude was ripped even though they were living in the apocalypse. I never saw him hit the gym once, lol

Right, so to be clear, the thread isn't about whether or not these bodies are realsitically attainable. Rather it's about the fact that a body type you describe to have struggled with getting is being commonly presented as the norm.

Whether you think it is attainable for someone is irrelevant. Most people aren't going to get that sort of body. Down on their luck alcoholic characters who are presented as doi g nothing but just sitting around all day especially.
Yes, like I said to Hjod, I agree with the thread topic.
 

Hjod

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
3,003
Behind my desk.
Oh, I totally agree with the thread topic but it's the same for women, it just became a thing for men as well in the last decade or two. Females have dealt with this for a loooong time. But yeah, even in that Birdbox movie on Netflix, the dude was ripped even though they were living in the apocalypse. I never saw him hit the gym once, lol
It's worse for women, but when it's about men we're supposed to flex our ego as soon we have a thread like this.

People need to understand that just because something worked for you doesn't mean it will work for everyone, peoples lives are different.
 

Anabolex

Member
Mar 23, 2018
220
So you don't think it's unrealistic that an alcoholic would work out 4-5 days a week, be on top of his diet and keep up on his cardio?

There are ton of factors that are keeping people from getting in to shape. It's not as easy as do X get Y results.
It is unlikely but I had a guy like this at my old gym. He got drunk on whiskey every day and was still huge.

I disagree with the second statement.
 
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RDreamer

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,408
Would you prefer people crying about how life is unfair and X and Y are unobtainable? If you want to look a certain way you have to invest time and effort and people here are offering advice how to achieve this goal. People who don't want to put in the effort simply don't want it enough and that is fine.
What if the only reason you want to look a certain way is because media has warped your perception to feel like that’s the only way to be healthy? What if the people in those films feel a lot of social pressure to look that way and really don’t want to? What if the pressure was so large they literally didn’t drink water for days and did reps between sets, etc just for a few seconds of screen time? What if they let up for just a few fucking days and because of this warped public perception people now think someone in goddamned near peak health and definitely top 1% has let himself go or god forbid is fat now?

These things don’t come about in a vacuum and their effects aren’t immediate. There are a lot of people who are ridiculously fit that may feel inadequate simply because this hyper unrealistic version of being fit is what’s pushed.

This guy. It would be weird for it to have things that have no relation to the topic. If a gaming, married, busy father of 2 can do it, anyone can. Nothing weird about talking about how it's done. Like Anabolex advised, if you want it you can have it. If not, don't worry about it. Being in top physical shape has always been sought after. People admire it and it can motivate them to achieve it.
Worries and body image issues aren’t just a thing you turn off. You don’t just ‘not worry.’ This is a shit thing to say. There are a lot of people that may not even know where their self worth issues are coming from. There are some that may not take the journey to being properly fit because the window of what society views as properly fit is ridiculously high. We’ve got people in here spouting off unexplained fucking acronyms. That’s fine but that’s like enthusiast level shit and as gamers we should know that sort of thing puts people off of ever starting a journey. So if someone wants to improve their self worth but sees the Helmsworths and Mamoas of the world and knows that it takes finding a fucking trainer in addition to time and dedication they may be short on and they might just stop. After all what’s the point?

Sure the mega buff can motivate some, but it can also do the opposite. It can normalize an unrealistic version of health that for a lot of people isn’t terribly attainable. And what’s dumb is that normalization of that standard almost belittles the work it takes to be fit and to be ripped, etc.
 
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RDreamer

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,408
While I think that it is unlikely that a depressed alcoholic works out alot I don't think it is unrealistic.
But that’s the fucking point. Why cast a bunch of people that look incredibly unlikely to be who they’re portraying? Put together that makes it even weirder. And then factor in that a lot of these actors don’t actually want to go through this shit but feel pressure to and you’ve got why the thread was made.

I admit Theroux is a poor example of an actor not wanting to look this way in all likelihood because it does seem like he’s a hobbyist boxer. But still I’ve seen a lot of interviews and talk from actors that show it’s kind of hell. Jackman’s wife fucking HATED the wolverine workout stuff. And I read an article about an acting school now having to teach weight lifting and such because it’s so big.
 

DvdGzz

Member
Mar 21, 2018
956
Worries and body image issues aren’t just a thing you turn off. You don’t just ‘not worry.’ This is a shit thing to say. There are a lot of people that may not even know where their self worth issues are coming from. There are some that may not take the journey to being properly fit because the window of what society views as properly fit is ridiculously high. We’ve got people in here spouting off unexplained fucking acronyms. That’s fine but that’s like enthusiast level shit and as gamers we should know that sort of thing puts people off of ever starting a journey. So if someone wants to improve their self worth but sees the Helmsworths and Mamoas of the world and knows that it takes finding a fucking trainer in addition to time and dedication they may be short on and they might just stop. After all what’s the point?

Sure the mega buff can motivate some, but it can also do the opposite. It can normalize an unrealistic version of health that for a lot of people isn’t terribly attainable. And what’s dumb is that normalization of that standard almost belittles the work it takes to be fit and to be ripped, etc.

Movie stars are enhanced(PEDS), they don't just get that jacked in 3 months without assistance. It takes years of dedication to look like them naturally so yes, I do think it can cause unrealistic expectations in people but why is this so serious that you have to curse about it?

The reason it takes so long for most and is a huge struggle begins in childhood. Parents pass down bad habits and have no knowledge of how nutrition works. Trainers and dieticians are not needed. Just basic calorie counting and learning better habits over time.
 
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RDreamer

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,408
Movie stars are enhanced(PEDS), they don't just get that jacked in 3 months without assistance. It takes years of dedication to look like them naturally so yes, I do think it can cause unrealistic expectations in people but why is this so serious that you have to curse about it?

The reason it takes so long for most and is a huge struggle begins in childhood. Parents pass down bad habits and have no knowledge of how nutrition works. Trainers and dieticians are not needed. Just basic calorie counting and learning better habits over time.
I curse. It’s what I do. It’s a bad habit. I need to cut down on it but it feels so fucking right most of the time. Pay no mind.

It’s serious because body image issues can lead to major depression. Or add to that. It’s serious because that can also start in childhood. People’s self worth can be tied up heavily in that sort of thing. And those trying to break into the industry because they love acting feel pressure to basically become gym rats, too. Or take PEDs. How is this not serious?

And yes you can become fit with basic calorie counting. You can be healthy with good eating and basic exercise. You’re not going to turn out like Theroux, Mamoa, or Helmsworth just by fucking chance though. Days on, days off, calorie counting, macros, proper form, cycling the right exercises, etc all go into that. It’s beyond even enthusiast level. And even then as we’ve said they’re likely not drinking for days and doing other things to enhance those few minutes on screen.

Personally I exercise a lot. Like a lot a lot. I’m ridiculously fit. But the only way I can fit things in is basically in between or during other shit. I bike a lot because I can do it while I work. I do body exercises like pushups, pull-ups, bicep curls, and crunches when I’m done in the bathroom or thinking for a few minutes or while my wife is nursing the baby. I simply cannot plan out exercise routines and lifts that all go together correctly to get to the state some of these actors are in. And that should be fine because as I said I’m fit as hell. But why doesn’t television show healthy and fit in other forms?