ParentERA |OT| What To Expect When You’re Not Sleeping

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,857
Anyone dealing/dealt with baby eczema? Poor guy has been so itchy lately even with moisturizer and prescribed cream. It might have been made worse by a bout of diarrhea he's had this past week, either from a virus or teething. Really want to give him some relief, and worry he might get a scratch or eczema lesion infected with staph or something.
I think one thing is to keep his diaper area clean and dry, then moisturize/block with cream. So after you wipe him when changing him, fan his bottom a little or otherwise let him air out for a while so that the wet wipe fluid dries off, then apply diaper cream (or your prescribed cream) before putting him in his fresh diaper. We were prescribed hydrocortisone cream for eczema and it helped a ton, though we try to use that sparingly because it's a steroid.

Another thing you could do is get hypoallergenic diapers. Those seemed to help my kid through the worst parts, and then we were able to switch back to normal diapers after. I dunno if that was a placebo effect or anything, but it seemed to help us.
 

O-Zips

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,335
I think one thing is to keep his diaper area clean and dry, then moisturize/block with cream. So after you wipe him when changing him, fan his bottom a little or otherwise let him air out for a while so that the wet wipe fluid dries off, then apply diaper cream (or your prescribed cream) before putting him in his fresh diaper. We were prescribed hydrocortisone cream for eczema and it helped a ton, though we try to use that sparingly because it's a steroid.

Another thing you could do is get hypoallergenic diapers. Those seemed to help my kid through the worst parts, and then we were able to switch back to normal diapers after. I dunno if that was a placebo effect or anything, but it seemed to help us.
The eczema is actually on his chest, arms, and legs. He has little to none in his diaper area or his face. We seemed to have it under control for a little while but the past few days he's been very itchy.
 

O-Zips

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,335
My daughter has really sensitive skin, and it took us a month or two to figure out we need to use the very gentle wipes and creams. Specifically, we're using Water Wipes, Cerave moisturizers/soaps, and Mustela cleaning rinse. She will get a rash if we use anything else. Our ped and allergist both recommended those brands for her, and everything went away when we used them religiously.

Also, because my kid has food allergies, we've learned ALOT about general food allergies, and lots of people swear that eczema is caused by the food mom eats (if breastfeeding) or ingredients in the formula. If switching creams doesn't work, have you tried either eliminating major food allergens and/or switching formulas? Could be worth a try if it's really bad.
Thanks! We are already using cerave but I'll talk with my wife about mustela.

We've thought of food allergies. Not sure if there's a way to know at this age without just trial and error, but we'll talk to the doctor about it. Next appointment is in a few days.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,713
We've thought of food allergies. Not sure if there's a way to know at this age without just trial and error, but we'll talk to the doctor about it. Next appointment is in a few days.
Generally they do advise you introduce foods one at a time for a few days each in order to pinpoint things like this if it is a food allergy. That's what we did. So for example, the first time he had peanut butter we didn't introduce anything new for a few days afterwards. Not sure that helps when you already have the results, but I guess you could back test it in the same way by going down to foods you know are safe or see what newer foods you introduced lately and doing a few days each of those.
 

O-Zips

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,335
Generally they do advise you introduce foods one at a time for a few days each in order to pinpoint things like this if it is a food allergy. That's what we did. So for example, the first time he had peanut butter we didn't introduce anything new for a few days afterwards. Not sure that helps when you already have the results, but I guess you could back test it in the same way by going down to foods you know are safe or see what newer foods you introduced lately and doing a few days each of those.
We'll be starting with solids soon so that'll be good to keep in mind!
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,713
We'll be starting with solids soon so that'll be good to keep in mind!
Especially important with big allergy items like peanut butter but we did similar with other things, even stuff like spinach just to make sure.

Also have fun with foods! The faces babies make at first are hilariously priceless.
 

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,857
The eczema is actually on his chest, arms, and legs. He has little to none in his diaper area or his face. We seemed to have it under control for a little while but the past few days he's been very itchy.
Could it be his clothes or bedsheets somehow? Maybe some sort of allergy to your brand of detergent?
 

GiJose

Member
Oct 25, 2017
111
Thanks! We are already using cerave but I'll talk with my wife about mustela.

We've thought of food allergies. Not sure if there's a way to know at this age without just trial and error, but we'll talk to the doctor about it. Next appointment is in a few days.
food allergies are really just trial and error. before 1 years of age allergy tests are pretty bad, and even afterwards, you generally only want to test if you suspect a specific allergy - there's often a false positive result, and it will tell you that your child may be allergic to something that they may not actually be allergic to

and for eczema, typically it flares up when teething or with viruses (and in more situations). it's not something you can really expect to resolve, more of a wax and waning situation. if it's there pretty often you may want to use steroid creams, i'm assuming that's what you mean by prescribed creams. in general, you should apply moisturizer at least twice daily. you want to avoid soap and full baths as much as possible, maybe just 2-3 times per week would be enough. a quick rinse is fine, don't dry off completely and then make sure to apply the moisturizer cream on top of moist skin to kind of lock the moisture in.

it's important to understand that it's really an underlying defect in his skin that makes it less effective as a barrier, which is why it's something that probably won't go away for a while. he may kind of outgrow it eventually, but like i said, it will come and go for a while. also odds are he got it from one of you guys, especially if there's seasonal allergies, asthma, or eczema in the family
 
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O-Zips

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,335
food allergies are really just trial and error. before 1 years of age allergy tests are pretty bad, and even afterwards, you generally only want to test if you suspect a specific allergy - there's often a false positive result, and it will tell you that your child may be allergic to something that they may not actually be allergic to

if there's a specific allergy you're worried about that is in the immediate family, like say peanut butter, you could try putting a smear on your child's skin to see if they have a reaction from that first

and for eczema, typically it flares up when teething or with viruses (and in more situations). it's not something you can really expect to resolve, more of a wax and waning situation. if it's there pretty often you may want to use steroid creams, i'm assuming that's what you mean by prescribed creams. in general, you should apply moisturizer at least twice daily. you want to avoid soap and full baths as much as possible, maybe just 2-3 times per week would be enough. a quick rinse is fine, don't dry off completely and then make sure to apply the moisturizer cream on top of moist skin to kind of lock the moisture in.

it's important to understand that it's really an underlying defect in his skin that makes it less effective as a barrier, which is why it's something that probably won't go away for a while. he may kind of outgrow it eventually, but like i said, it will come and go for a while. also odds are he got it from one of you guys, especially if there's seasonal allergies, asthma, or eczema in the family
Oh we already know he got it from his mom. She has always struggled with eczema.

Could it be his clothes or bedsheets somehow? Maybe some sort of allergy to your brand of detergent?
Maybe. We'll be looking at all options. We already use a hypoallergenic detergent so not sure what we could change there. Maybe a different brand.
 

RedNalgene

Member
Oct 25, 2017
331
if there's a specific allergy you're worried about that is in the immediate family, like say peanut butter, you could try putting a smear on your child's skin to see if they have a reaction from that first
Whatever you do, DO NOT DO THIS. We were told specifically by one of the top allergy institutes in the country that this is an old wives tale, and can actually CAUSE allergic reactions to peanuts. If you're really concerned about allergic reactions due to a family history then make sure you talk to your kid's doctor about having childrens Benadryl on hand in case there is a severe reaction, but don't start smearing stuff on babies to test. Or, you can take them in to have them tested but as mentioned above, it's not foolproof when they are that little.

No offense here, it was something that our allergist specifically (and forcefully) pointed out as not to do.
 

GiJose

Member
Oct 25, 2017
111
Whatever you do, DO NOT DO THIS. We were told specifically by one of the top allergy institutes in the country that this is an old wives tale, and can actually CAUSE allergic reactions to peanuts. If you're really concerned about allergic reactions due to a family history then make sure you talk to your kid's doctor about having childrens Benadryl on hand in case there is a severe reaction, but don't start smearing stuff on babies to test. Or, you can take them in to have them tested but as mentioned above, it's not foolproof when they are that little.

No offense here, it was something that our allergist specifically (and forcefully) pointed out as not to do.
i definitely misspoke

yeah, don't do that

if there's an immediate family history you need to see an allergist

i don't know why i wrote that
 

texhnolyze

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,099
Indonesia
Our little guy was super congested for the first month or so, with another flare up (possibly from a cold) before finally clearing up for good at about two+ months. Saline drops can be used to help loosen any globs of mucus - especially ones too far back to see. With a little luck that got out a big glob and gave him a couple hours of relief. We also got a humidifier to help keep the air from getting really dry. The snot suckers never really worked. I -hated- the congestion as it would wake him up after we'd finally gotten him to sleep, and I worried he might just stop breathing while asleep because of it. Nurses said they'd never seen a baby more congested. That + gas cramps made the first one to two months super fun.

Gentle touching or blowing on the hair/face was usually enough to wake up the little guy during feeding.


Anyone dealing/dealt with baby eczema? Poor guy has been so itchy lately even with moisturizer and prescribed cream. It might have been made worse by a bout of diarrhea he's had this past week, either from a virus or teething. Really want to give him some relief, and worry he might get a scratch or eczema lesion infected with staph or something.
Thanks for the saline drops suggestion. I finally consulted with a doctor earlier this morning, and he recommend using it as well.

However, he also gave us some medicine, which are antibiotics and a cold medicine. I'm kinda not sure if he actually got our concerns with the baby, because he's already quite old for a doctor. He also speak very softly we could barely hear what he said. Anyway, the baby gain weight just fine and he feed vigorously every 3 hours or so, even more often sometimes. So we believe that he doesn't need the medicine for now.
 

CrudeDiatribe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
702
Eastern Canada
So... what we thought was teething (“year 2 molars on her second birthday? Ok”) turns out to probably be hand foot and mouth disease. If you like mostly-inconsolable screaming would definitely recommend.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,721
Oh rats. My daughter had hand foot and mouth back in ... February or so I think. It wasn't that bad for us, mostly took the form of just a bad cold that lasted for about 3-5 days with off/on symptoms that lasted a bit longer. My wife and I both got sick, but luckily it wasn't HF+M. Keep your daughter out of daycare if she goes. Also the sores are not contagious if they're not "oozing" or w/e, but even my sister the pediatrician was like it's almost entirely passed on by spit, not by touching open sores and some daycares needlessly freakout by the sores... which can last for weeks but the contagion is long gone at that point and baby likely feels fine.

Baby tylenol helped there, IIRC... The sore throat was the worst part.
 

GiJose

Member
Oct 25, 2017
111
Youre most contagious while actively sick, but you probably still secrete virus for up to 6 weeks in saliva and poops
 

lt519

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,205
We had the doctor appointment Monday (I can't remember the days lol) and she fully endorsed the sleep training, which was enough to push my wife over the edge, so we went through with it.

Anyway, we did the sleep training through the Ferber method. One night. Literally one night and they have now slept through the night 3 times in a row. BOTH OF THEM. They both haven't slept through the night since they were born. It took the boy almost the full hour (50 minutes) of going in to comfort him without picking him up to get him to go back to sleep and the girl took only 30 minutes and a few visits. So one really stressful night for us (and them).

At the same time they still fall asleep with the pacifier but we cut out giving it back to them if they wake up and they seem less dependent on that as well.

For what it is worth, we have Nest so we can see how they moved throughout the night and there is some tossing and turning but no obvious times where they are moving a lot. They still wake up a bit early hungry, around 5:30/6 and they are sure to let us know they are hungry. During one nap the girl got her foot stuck in the crib bars and she sure let us know she needed help too (need to fix that, happened yesterday), so I don't feel like we've taught them to not communicate when they have a serious need.

Doctor also advised to cut out the dream feeding but we figure one thing at a time, we'll probably cut that out next week and see if they can condense that snack into their daily eating as well.

The funny thing is that we're both waking up at 4, 4:30, 5, and 5:30 just naturally because it became part of our routine. I imagine they'll regress here and there but the fact that the change was so quick is amazing.
 
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Anno

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,437
Columbus, Ohio
We had the doctor appointment Monday (I can't remember the days lol) and she fully endorsed the sleep training, which was enough to push my wife over the edge, so we went through with it.

Anyway, we did the sleep training through the Ferber method. One night. Literally one night and they have now slept through the night 3 times in a row. BOTH OF THEM. They both haven't slept through the night since they were born. It took the boy almost the full hour (50 minutes) of going in to comfort him without picking him up to get him to go back to sleep and the girl took only 30 minutes and a few visits. So one really stressful night for us (and them).

At the same time they still fall asleep with the pacifier but we cut out giving it back to them if they wake up and they seem less dependent on that as well.

For what it is worth, we have Nest so we can see how they moved throughout the night and there is some tossing and turning but no obvious times where they are moving a lot. They still wake up a bit early hungry, around 5:30/6 and they are sure to let us know they are hungry. During one nap the girl got her foot stuck in the crib bars and she sure let us know she needed help too (need to fix that, happened yesterday), so I don't feel like we've taught them to not communicate when they have a serious need.

Doctor also advised to cut out the dream feeding but we figure one thing at a time, we'll probably cut that out next week and see if they can condense that snack into their daily eating as well.

The funny thing is that we're both waking up at 4, 4:30, 5, and 5:30 just naturally because it became part of our routine. I imagine they'll regress here and there but the fact that the change was so quick is amazing.
This is literally the same thing that happened to us. She hasn’t changed since. If it continues down the same track then in a month or two they’ll just start refusing the pacifier altogether. When that starts just put it away and never worry about that again.
 

CrudeDiatribe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
702
Eastern Canada
Baby tylenol helped there, IIRC... The sore throat was the worst part.
That and Advil— latter of which seems to be more effective, so just using the former to bridge the Advil doses. Longer and longer between doses now.

Youre most contagious while actively sick, but you probably still secrete virus for up to 6 weeks in saliva and poops
Hope daycare washes everyone’s hands a lot because there’s no way we can keep her out that long :/
 

splash wave

Member
Oct 25, 2017
552
Bay Area, CA
Is it normal to be jealous of basically everyone when you first have a baby? I love my daughter, but seeing friends on IG and such live their lives not tethered to an infant can drive me mad sometimes. I’m so tired.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,713
Is it normal to be jealous of basically everyone when you first have a baby? I love my daughter, but seeing friends on IG and such live their lives not tethered to an infant can drive me mad sometimes. I’m so tired.
Yeah definitely. I love my son and wouldn’t trade him for the world but seeing people posting about being able to play more than 2 hours a week of a game or knowing they can get more than 6 hours a night of uninterrupted sleep makes me jealous. Also ended up missing some amazing concerts since he’s been born so there’s some jealousy there.

We had a colicky baby so hell I was jealous of some people that could take their baby out of the fucking house confidently. We can now, but the first 3 months he cried so much plus it was winter weather here we felt stuck inside and couldn’t do shit. We feel so much freer now. We’ve taken him to restaurants and to get ice cream and shopping and stuff.

Now I’m kinda jealous of the ones who post about their 2 hours of adult time when their kid goes to bed. Goddamn that’d be heavenly.
 

Podge293

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,580
Is it normal to be jealous of basically everyone when you first have a baby? I love my daughter, but seeing friends on IG and such live their lives not tethered to an infant can drive me mad sometimes. I’m so tired.
ah but think of what they cant do.

those parent and child parking spots are glorious

skipping queues on planes cuz you have a pram, also glorious
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,713
Our little one (10.5 months) is finally starting to walk. He doesn’t do it a lot at this point but he can shuffle a good 6 steps or so. He’s pretty stable and slow at it. Now he tends to crawl distances and use walking for precision to get closer to whatever he wants.
 

emag

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,914
Our little one (10.5 months) is finally starting to walk. He doesn’t do it a lot at this point but he can shuffle a good 6 steps or so. He’s pretty stable and slow at it. Now he tends to crawl distances and use walking for precision to get closer to whatever he wants.
Once kids start to walk they’re super fun. Enjoy!
 

texhnolyze

Member
Oct 25, 2017
12,099
Indonesia
My boy always has breathing trouble at night even though we regularly clean his nose mucus with a cleaner up to 2 times a day. Putting him to sleep on his side greatly help sometimes. Is it fine for a baby less than 1 month old to sleep that way?

Also, my friend recommend this to ease up the baby's breathing trouble. Would you folks recommend it as well?

 

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,857
Is it normal to be jealous of basically everyone when you first have a baby? I love my daughter, but seeing friends on IG and such live their lives not tethered to an infant can drive me mad sometimes. I’m so tired.
IMO the first few months are the hardest. Neither me nor my wife found parenting all that rewarding for the first few months (the "potato" phase) because it's just a continuous stream of work where the baby is barely responsive, so it feels like a relationship where the baby is just taking all this effort from you over and over while doing nothing in return because she's a newborn. You're constantly "on" and every second of your life is dedicated to making sure the kid doesn't die somehow, so of course that can be maddening because you feel like you have no time to be yourself at all.

It's a huge shift in lifestyle and a return to "normal" life seems impossible during that time. So I think it is understandable to see people having normal lives that you used to have and be jealous of that. The thing is, a return to some sort of normalcy seems impossible now, but it does get more stable later. I remember asking on this thread "does life return to normal?" about a year ago myself. You'll never return entirely to life as it was before you had a kid because the kid is such a big part of your life at any age, but you do eventually get some time back for yourself as the kid gets older and less helpless.

It gets easier later when the kid becomes more responsive. When the kid is old enough to look at you, smile or laugh, it'll all be worth it. Nothing beats seeing that.

As for socializing, that gets doable later as the kid gets older too. My kid's almost two now, and sometimes we take turns looking after the kid so that the other can go out and not be a parent for a few hours. So I'll watch the kid at home for a few hours while my wife goes out with friends, or vice versa. We've been doing this to varying degrees since around six months or so.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,713
Personally I felt more able to be "myself" and have time to do things when my baby was like 1-3 months old. Yeah, I wasn't getting much of any sleep, but I could play some games while he slept, my wife and I could keep up a nice dinner with our daily show and have good conversations about whatever. I was also able to get some work done while he napped on me and such. I guess we did feel a bit trapped inside since he was such a ridiculously fussy baby when awake that we couldn't take him anywhere. And the cold Wisconsin winter stopped things.

Now at 10-11 months he naps less, we can barely talk sometimes when both watching him (if that occurs much), and we definitely aren't getting any shows or movies together. For the first few months aside from during sleep there wasn't much of a risk of him getting injured or dying whereas now and when he started to crawl we've had to be really on and watchful of what he's doing, where he's going, what he might be shoving in his mouth, etc.

Babies are indeed a lot more fun when they're past the newborn stage. It's a delight when they start social smiling and then discovering everything, but you're going to have to find small ways to be 'normal' for a long while it seems. My wife and I take an after dinner walk nearly every day and can actually talk because he's not commanding so much attention when he's just chilling and looking in the stroller. We're also able to get out to restaurants here and there. He's a bit more work obviously, but at least he allows us to go.
 

RedNalgene

Member
Oct 25, 2017
331
IMO the first few months are the hardest. Neither me nor my wife found parenting all that rewarding for the first few months (the "potato" phase) because it's just a continuous stream of work where the baby is barely responsive, so it feels like a relationship where the baby is just taking all this effort from you over and over while doing nothing in return because she's a newborn. You're constantly "on" and every second of your life is dedicated to making sure the kid doesn't die somehow, so of course that can be maddening because you feel like you have no time to be yourself at all.

It's a huge shift in lifestyle and a return to "normal" life seems impossible during that time. So I think it is understandable to see people having normal lives that you used to have and be jealous of that. The thing is, a return to some sort of normalcy seems impossible now, but it does get more stable later. I remember asking on this thread "does life return to normal?" about a year ago myself. You'll never return entirely to life as it was before you had a kid because the kid is such a big part of your life at any age, but you do eventually get some time back for yourself as the kid gets older and less helpless.

It gets easier later when the kid becomes more responsive. When the kid is old enough to look at you, smile or laugh, it'll all be worth it. Nothing beats seeing that.

As for socializing, that gets doable later as the kid gets older too. My kid's almost two now, and sometimes we take turns looking after the kid so that the other can go out and not be a parent for a few hours. So I'll watch the kid at home for a few hours while my wife goes out with friends, or vice versa. We've been doing this to varying degrees since around six months or so.
I'll totally second this. My daughter is now 20 months old and hilarious. I love spending time interacting with her, but my wife and I are also getting time away from her. We do "date" nights, or we'll trade off taking personal time to either go out with friends or do something for ourselves, like work out. That all starts to happen at around the year mark. And although this doesn't seem like the case now....you're going to have a hard time leaving your kid in the care of someone else to do the bedtime routine so you can go out. It's really hard when I say goodnight to my daughter so I can go for a run and she says "dada read a book". All she wants is to sit on my lap and read her a book, but for my own sanity I sometimes need to say no.

You'll definitely never get back to the carefree way you used to live - you're responsible for another human being now. But you do get back to socializing and a more normal life once those first few dark months end.
 

Anno

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,437
Columbus, Ohio
Yeah now that ours is ~15 months old we find a decent amount of time for ourselves. Obviously nowhere near what it once was, though. Getting a room really segmented off made just for the baby helps a lot as I can usually sit in there and read if she’s in an independent mood without having to keep constant vigil on her. Then thankfully she has no problem going to bed at 7 and giving us a few hours in the evening.

Weekends we’ve taken to having me watch her until her noon nap then my wife after that until dinner/bedtime. That way we both get 3-5 hours each weekend day where we don’t need to feel compelled to help watch the baby. She gets to sleep in like she used to and I get a couple afternoons to play a game or go golfing.
 

RedNalgene

Member
Oct 25, 2017
331
Also, a few months ago my daughter started getting more into independent play. So, she'll take her stuffed animals and arrange them, or spend 15 minutes putting blocks in one of her pails, dumping it out, and repeating. So on days where I'm watching her she'll play for 20-30 minute stretches by herself which lets me sit back and read, listen to music, do chores, etc.
 

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,857
All she wants is to sit on my lap and read her a book, but for my own sanity I sometimes need to say no.
Haha, my kid has learned to do this to resist things he doesn't like. So if I need to take him somewhere he doesn't want to go, he'll plop himself into my lap and then go limp so that it's hard to get him off me.

How did he learn that going limp was a good way to make it harder for me to pick him up?
 

lt519

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,205
We had a colicky baby so hell I was jealous of some people that could take their baby out of the fucking house confidently. We can now, but the first 3 months he cried so much plus it was winter weather here we felt stuck inside and couldn’t do shit. We feel so much freer now. We’ve taken him to restaurants and to get ice cream and shopping and stuff.
Also same boat in Upstate NY with them being born in January, felt a little cooped up. But..

It's easy for us to compare since we have two. But our boy was colicky until about 4 months and there was zero chance we were going to take him somewhere public because he was always minutes away from a full meltdown. The girl on the other hand, I could see having taken her out at 1-2 months old and letting her sleep in her stroller, seat, etc, no problem.

Even now we're hesitant to take the boy out to public places, like a fair or concert, because he gets sooooo frustrated if he can't move within 5 minutes. He really hates to be confined unless he's moving (stroller) so we mostly do walks with quick stops or visit friends houses where he's free to roll around and do whatever. Even when home he's had enough after being in any one spot for 10-15 minutes. I absolutely can not wait until he can crawl/walk, I think he'll be a lot more content. For a few weeks now he's been lifting himself up on all fours and rocking back and forth so he's close to figuring it out

Edit: 2 days later we went out to a restaurant for the first time without family members/friends and both lasted for ~1 1/2 hours before it was past their bedtime and they started getting fussy.

To continue the blog, tonight is the first night we're cutting out dream feeding and so far so good. We scaled it back from 4oz each to 2oz and started moving it forwards 15 minutes every night until just cutting it out entirely tonight. Seems overly cautious but with them sleeping for the first time (they both slept until 6:45 today!!!!) we're hesitant to rock the boat to much.
 
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Oct 27, 2017
2,309
I have 5 weeks old twin boys, do any of you have coping mechanisms for the awful lack of sleep you're getting? It's just grinding me down. I'm back to work tomorrow and I'm not going to be able to function.
 

theaface

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,010
Baby number two was born last night - a beautiful little sister to our 2.5 year old Sullivan. Waters broke the night before so we went in 24 hours later expecting to be induced. Suddenly she was born 15 minutes after arriving at the hospital, which was a surprise to say the least.

My wife was a superstar and they’re both doing well. We’re all crushingly tired, but I guess that’s something to get used to!
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,721
Gosh major regression in sleep habits the last week. My 1 year old used to be a great sleeper then the last few weeks it's gotten worse and worse....last night she didn't go to sleep till 1130pm (and of course it was a night my wife was away for the night and I had lined up a steady supply of beer and videogames... Ended up crashing myself like 15 mins after she finally fell asleep), today she's losing it still about an hour after putting her to bed.

Keep thinking it's teething or she's hungry or something but... Nah, just a regression.

I've finally got her down it seems....... But she can sense as soon as I leave the room and loses it! I'm gonna make a run for it.......!!!

Wish me luck!!

3 mins down and ... No screaming yet ...

...

Yet...
 
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The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,721
Baby number two was born last night - a beautiful little sister to our 2.5 year old Sullivan. Waters broke the night before so we went in 24 hours later expecting to be induced. Suddenly she was born 15 minutes after arriving at the hospital, which was a surprise to say the least.

My wife was a superstar and they’re both doing well. We’re all crushingly tired, but I guess that’s something to get used to!
Wow congrats!

Re: quick delivery yeah they say the 2nd kids can come out a lot quicker. My friends had that with their second thinking they'd have some time and then the baby was delivered like 30 mins after getting to the hospital. Doctor told them if they ever have another one she'll have to be induced early or it'll basically fall out at home

(....well not literally but you get what I mean)
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,721
I have 5 weeks old twin boys, do any of you have coping mechanisms for the awful lack of sleep you're getting? It's just grinding me down. I'm back to work tomorrow and I'm not going to be able to function.
I feel like any advice for 1 kid just doesn't apply with 2. In that case I'd really recommend asking if a family member (parent) would stay for a night maybe your mom one night, your wifes mom the next, which wou
My boy always has breathing trouble at night even though we regularly clean his nose mucus with a cleaner up to 2 times a day. Putting him to sleep on his side greatly help sometimes. Is it fine for a baby less than 1 month old to sleep that way?

Also, my friend recommend this to ease up the baby's breathing trouble. Would you folks recommend it as well?

Most essential oils are unproven but when you're desperate you're desperate.

Obviously sleeping on back is the best but my daughter slept on her side from time to time and now she's a strict side or stomach sleeper. Unfortunately there's just no remedy to mucus. It's normal but frustrating.

Good thing is it gets better the older they get.

What worked best for me was to have my daughter fall asleep on me and then I'd transition her to bed. It wouldn't last but at least we'd both get a couple hours consistent sleep till the next time.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,721
Is it normal to be jealous of basically everyone when you first have a baby? I love my daughter, but seeing friends on IG and such live their lives not tethered to an infant can drive me mad sometimes. I’m so tired.
Everything is normal so don't sweat it. You feel enough guilt as a new parent so don't feel guilty by feeling jealous or envious of friends who have their childless freedom.

At some point you'll get to celebrate the joy of telling people you don't really want to hang out with "dammmn sorry can't Hang out tonight babys not feeling well...."
 

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,857
Baby number two was born last night - a beautiful little sister to our 2.5 year old Sullivan. Waters broke the night before so we went in 24 hours later expecting to be induced. Suddenly she was born 15 minutes after arriving at the hospital, which was a surprise to say the least.

My wife was a superstar and they’re both doing well. We’re all crushingly tired, but I guess that’s something to get used to!
Congrats!
 
Oct 27, 2017
2,309
Did any of your babies take ages to get the hang of breast feeding? In week 6 now and only feeding intermittently with a nipple shield, and even at that he sometimes gets his tongue in the wrong place and spills nearly everything he sucks. My wife is expressing to feed him but it's taking a toll now trying to breast feed, expressing, and then finally bottle feeding.
 

emag

Member
Oct 26, 2017
4,914
Did any of your babies take ages to get the hang of breast feeding? In week 6 now and only feeding intermittently with a nipple shield, and even at that he sometimes gets his tongue in the wrong place and spills nearly everything he sucks. My wife is expressing to feed him but it's taking a toll now trying to breast feed, expressing, and then finally bottle feeding.
I highly recommend working with a lactation consultant. Your insurance probably covers at least one session.
 

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,857
Did any of your babies take ages to get the hang of breast feeding? In week 6 now and only feeding intermittently with a nipple shield, and even at that he sometimes gets his tongue in the wrong place and spills nearly everything he sucks. My wife is expressing to feed him but it's taking a toll now trying to breast feed, expressing, and then finally bottle feeding.
It sounds like the latch might not be good if he's spilling. There could be any number of things that could be improved, since breastfeeding is surprisingly unintuitive at times.

But if you're using a nipple shield, see if it's the right size. If it's too big, it might not be forming a proper seal, which could lead to those latching issues.

Breastfeeding issues can be really draining to deal with. See if you can get a lactation consultant to help.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,713
Did any of your babies take ages to get the hang of breast feeding? In week 6 now and only feeding intermittently with a nipple shield, and even at that he sometimes gets his tongue in the wrong place and spills nearly everything he sucks. My wife is expressing to feed him but it's taking a toll now trying to breast feed, expressing, and then finally bottle feeding.
Have you guys tried a breast feeding consultant? My wife went a few times to the ones at our pediatrician's office. They were really helpful with techniques and stuff.
 

RedNalgene

Member
Oct 25, 2017
331
Did any of your babies take ages to get the hang of breast feeding? In week 6 now and only feeding intermittently with a nipple shield, and even at that he sometimes gets his tongue in the wrong place and spills nearly everything he sucks. My wife is expressing to feed him but it's taking a toll now trying to breast feed, expressing, and then finally bottle feeding.
As others have said - work with a Lactation consultant. My wife had a really hard time getting my daughter to latch and used nipple shields for the first 4-6 weeks because it just wasn’t working. Eventually we transitioned away from the nipple shields and now she just nurses without them. It was a long and frustrating road but it worked out. I have no doubt it would have never worked if we hadn’t worked with a good Lactation consultant.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,721
Did any of your babies take ages to get the hang of breast feeding? In week 6 now and only feeding intermittently with a nipple shield, and even at that he sometimes gets his tongue in the wrong place and spills nearly everything he sucks. My wife is expressing to feed him but it's taking a toll now trying to breast feed, expressing, and then finally bottle feeding.
Lactation consultants can be mean/stressful for mothers, but I'd recommend it. We were lucky and our daughter took the boob pretty quickly, but friends have had trouble and the lactation consultant really helped them. If baby hasn't picked it up at 6 weeks it'll be harder than 1 week, but still worth trying. There was one that came on the 2nd day in the hospital before we left, but I know most pediatricians offices also refer you to them if you ask.

My wife breast fed and pumped, and while she hated pumping (just a massive pain in the ass), I liked that she pumped because it gave me the opportunity to feed baby so she could sleep. We had friends that exclusively breast fed and I think that's crazy... and it was hard for them to transition to formula when she stopped producing.
 

NoirSuede

Member
Oct 25, 2017
209
This is a really odd question, but how would you guys react if you found out your child's

Fetish