• The GiftBot 2.0 Launch Giveaway Extravaganza has come to a close with an astounding 8073 games given away to the community by 696 members, a huge success thanks to you! The gifting now continues with more official prizes in the new Gaming Giveaways |OT|. Leftover Steam codes are also being given away to the PC Gaming Era community.

So China, what can be done?

Oct 27, 2017
936
The global economy is too interconnected for economic sanctions to do very much without harming other developed countries just as much, if not more, than they would hurt the PRC. Boycotts may work in a limited way to put pressure on western companies to not self-censor, but that depends on western populations actually caring about this as an issue. But big corporations are almost never going to not try to invest in mainland China; the market is far too large.

Looking at population growth and birthrates, in the long term China is arguably even more demographically fucked than the west, so wait long enough and they'll eventually stagnate and peak in power. A Chinese-dominated world is not an inevitable future, nor would it be a permanent one.
 

mAcOdIn

Member
Oct 27, 2017
535
Looking at population growth and birthrates, in the long term China is arguably even more demographically fucked than the west, so wait long enough and they'll eventually stagnate and peak in power. A Chinese-dominated world is not an inevitable future, nor would it be a permanent one.
What does it matter if they peak later if we're already capitulating our values to them now? Their market will always be huge, they could stagnate forever and it'd still be a market people wouldn't want to ignore. The world needs to either stand up to them together economically and take the hit or this is the new reality.
 

Sanka

Member
Feb 17, 2019
687
Realize that the root cause of this problem is capitalism and create class conscious within the working class. Companies are not your friends.
 

Catshade

Member
Oct 26, 2017
577
Dismantle the CCP, but western powers have bad track records when it comes to dismantling authoritarian regimes and replacing it with (supposedly) better ones.
 

fanboi

The Fallen
Oct 25, 2017
3,568
Sweden
Isolate them.

Companies need incetives to move production to other countries or even home.
Put trade restrictions on them.
Restrict chinese involvment in countries (own companies, marketing for the chinese goverment and so on).
Continued pressue on their behavior.

Would take decades, but bar a military invasion...
 

Neo C.

Member
Nov 9, 2017
652
Automation, we really need to push automation far more. Adidas for example brought some of the production back to Germany thanks to a new highly automated factory. So far, it's just a small percentage though. We need to do this on a much larger scale. It also has a nice side-effect of making your own country more productive.

More and better trade agreements with other countries also need to be pushed more. Ironically thanks to Trump, my country has finally got a new trade agreement with Japan for example. If you want less dependency, this is the way to go.
 

Kill3r7

Member
Oct 25, 2017
8,589
You can try to buy less stuff from China but one might find out that boycotting China might be harder than one thinks.
 

JoJokomoko

Member
May 31, 2019
36
People who advocate for invasion or war really need to get their reality check. The war would destroy the entire world economy, not to mention the risk of nuclear armageddon.

Back on topic, I believe the change can only come from Chinese citizens themselves but I'm completely hopeless on how that would happen with a younger Chinese generation.

Speaking from my experience, I've met one of my closet group of friends who were Chinese during my time studying aboard in New Zealand. They were good people, helping me during my times of need. But one thing that I've been noticing is that almost every single one of my Chinese friend get very heated when it comes to the discussion between China sovereignty over Hong Kong and Taiwan.
They even go so far to protest on the university board when one of the world maps in our classes listed Hong Kong and Taiwan as an independent nation. Even now, when we're talking about the recent event in Hong Kong, they all believe that it was the west trying to interfere and stir up the peace. I don't know if they truly love their government or fear them. But due to how they getting so riled up and angry at the western world every time this issue is brought up in our discussion, I fear it's the former.

It's also doesn't help with the overwhelming majority of Chinese netizen hurling insult and hateful words towards an event like 9/11 on social media after the NBA's tweet.
 
Last edited:

GC-

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,103
Absolutely nothing. This isn't some unexpected development either, the rise of China has been predicted for centuries and different governments have been interfering for longer.
 
Last edited:

Reversed

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,630
I believe a change of the chinese status quo would take decades past a human lifetime :( But as long as people keep pointing out the stinkers without compromising jobs (pity on those that are held mouth shut by, for instance, Tencent) or any essential parts of our lifestyle (not that we can't boycott anything chinese made), we can only hope that their overly authoritarian 'tude starts waning and fading away.

The shit the uighurs have to deal with just leave me with no words, let alone country leaders staying silent on the HK protests.
 

crazyfunster

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,610
What can be done is dependent on what price we're willing to pay as a society to do it.

War isn't going to happen. If we were willing to hurt our economy, we could put a total trade embargo on China, and put Iranian style sanctions on China. We won't do this though- it would hurt us a lot too, though it would cripple China.
 

shnurgleton

Member
Oct 27, 2017
10,514
Boston
This is sort of the more intelligent argument for the tariffs. Decouple the US economy from China so we can actually counter them. But that has shown to be a task too difficult for this shitministration and has been very damaging to our domestic manufacturing sector. And also this is why China is hard at work building an emerging market for Chinese goods in Africa. There is very little the United States can do until we have shown our economy doesn't need China, or until there is some decisive end to the CCP
 

SG-17

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
9,222
Incentivize companies to move supply lines out of China eventually mandating it, ban tech companies from acquiescing to CCP demands, redo the TPP correctly, ban Chinese investment in Western companies/real estate/etc, end all trade with China except that which goes through Hong Kong and Macau, arm and train resistance movements in Hong Kong and the mainland surreptitiously, recognize Taiwan as an independent nation.
 

Mivey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,737
So Trump exposed America's weakness and now the vultures are circling the prey. Russia and China were never this bold before.
It's less about them being bold, China was always bullish about this stuff. It's that it's something a larger audience suddenly starts to care about. And even then, it's a gamer being banned that triggered the widespread outrage, not, you know, Muslims being imprisoned and pregnant women cut open alive.
 
Oct 27, 2017
1,475
Change needs to come from within. Without a Chinese Gorbachev, it’s gonna be difficult.

Unless the population rises up and is supported by the army.
 

krazen

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,448
Gentrified Brooklyn
Its happening.
While Trump‘s taking a bull in China shop approach (pun unintended), you already see other asian countries taking up some of China’s manufacturing because big business is worried at the trade war and wants less politically volatile places to manufacture. Huewei was a big stand and it crippled them.

That said, what’s fascinating is the US is by their now inherently racist way of dealing with developing countries is ceeding power to China in different ways. Where we saw ‘shithole countries’, China sees opportunity and is investing heavily in Africa etc giving them resources and markets we can be locked out of. Accusations of currency manipulation are moot when its sent overseas and effectively laundered into real businesses, real estate and infrastructure they own.

There’s also the longer term game of where if we don’t want to deal with a new superpower neither does Russia, and as China gets more bold I expect some growing pains in the relationship there since they are going after the same things. They want a piece of Africa, they might see their foothold in the Middle East threatened, etc
 

electricblue

Member
Oct 27, 2017
827
Lots we can sanction CCP leaders
We can threaten to expel China from WTO
We can encourage divestment from Chinese firms
We can work with our allies to do the above in their countries

The US has all the cards in this struggle we just need a leader who isn’t shooting us in the foot every day
 

Don Fluffles

Member
Oct 28, 2017
3,172
There's no single solution, but here are some things you can do to the extent possible:

Don't buy products or services from China or Chinese companies, particularly if they have ties to the Chinese government.
Don't support companies that betray human rights and freedom of expression to appease the authoritarian regime of China.
Write to your representatives in government in your country. Ask them to take similar action at a national or local government level.
Tell people what's going on.
Speak.
The first two are nigh impossible when they have their hands in so much of our everyday products. This is why it's important for government to do the big things we can't alone.
 

raygcon

Member
Oct 30, 2017
643
Unless China collapse by itself, it's kind of a bit too late to try flexing muscle with them. Don't get me wrong, I think China still has a long way to go to achieving the real world super power status the same way as US. But they are far too big, too rich, too influential for any country who want to put their hand into this situation. And to be fair, most of these issues are internal. So I'm not sure why would any foreign country want to get involve. There is no benefit there even for the US.

Imagine some countries want to get involve with US shooting or racism problem? Same thing.

Any super power will abuse their power one way or another. Same thing as how US direct all their company to ban Huawei. That's even more scary because it a direct order to destroy a foreign company who start to be challenge competitor. That's far more money involve than just some Chinese citizen ban some American brands.
 

Jmdajr

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,287
We need other countries to make our shit. I feel way too high a percentage comes from China alone.

Granted this can't happen in a day.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,444
Sweden
What would be the possibility of an American president to go to Hong Kong and speak in front of the crowds there and voice their support?

I know obviously Trump wouldn't do this, but how would you go about doing it? Since it's technically part of China, would the White House need to ask the CCP for allowance to go there?
 

mAcOdIn

Member
Oct 27, 2017
535
What would be the possibility of an American president to go to Hong Kong and speak in front of the crowds there and voice their support?

I know obviously Trump wouldn't do this, but how would you go about doing it? Since it's technically part of China, would the White House need to ask the CCP for allowance to go there?
Zero chance.

As much as I agree with the cause it'd be like Putin coming to Texas and throwing his support for secession from the United States. Of course it wouldn't be allowed, it shouldn't and no good could come of it.
 

Seik

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,777
Québec City
In the political sphere, they have to be severely sanctioned by most countries for their inhumane treatments of prisoners and disrespect toward the HK treaty.

As for us little people, the best we can do is buy as less Chinese products as possible (best of luck in this endeavor) and call out and boycott companies who show support for this authoritarian regime.

Also shower their Twitter with Winnie the Pooh/Xi pics.
 

wandering

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,467
Pacific Northwest
What would be the possibility of an American president to go to Hong Kong and speak in front of the crowds there and voice their support?

I know obviously Trump wouldn't do this, but how would you go about doing it? Since it's technically part of China, would the White House need to ask the CCP for allowance to go there?
Even less likely than a president visiting Taiwan.
 

LegendofJoe

Member
Oct 28, 2017
5,614
Arkansas, USA
The only thing i could see working would be for all companies to pull manufacturing out of china, then the rest of the world would need to place embargoes on china basically treat them how we treat north korea. It would have to be a slow process, I don't think it would be feasible for all companies to get out quickly. Only thing is all of the big corporations have to want to do this first, I don't think they would let it happen
Everything you described here was something that the Trans-Pacific partnership was going to implement. But thanks to moronic populists like Trump and Bernie we have tariffs and a brewing cold war instead.