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Had no idea 'Sapiens' was pronounced differently between US and UK English. What are some of your pronunciation surprises?

Americans generally are closer to current native pronunciation of the origin language when it comes to words of Spanish and Italian origin.

The UK generally do much better with words of French origin, which seems a bit ironic to me, but not at all if you know the history of English.
 

OG Kush

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,405
I always found the UK style of making corporations and other singular proper nouns plural bizarre. e.g. “Apple are making a new phone” or “Manchester United are playing”. They are singular entities; sure, they’re comprised of multiple people, but it’s not like you say “the city are hosting a festival”.
I think this is good. It humanises corporations, making it more likely for them to bear responsiblity for their actions, rather than the ultra-capital USA view where corporations have lax social responsibility.
 

LL_Decitrig

User-Requested Ban
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
10,334
Sunderland
This has to be a regional thing, because I pronounce it as rover. Range Rover.
Rage Rover!

But I think the main question here is whether the "-er" syllable is actually pronounced after some fashion, or degrades into a virtually soundless schwa. I think word endings in British English could well be following a similar evolution to that of French. In modern French the words are often more evident in the absence of pronunciation. They're written in a perfectly grammatical form of the written language, but the spoken language has a life of its own, unmoored from much of its grammatical roots
 

Cocolina

Member
Oct 28, 2017
4,603
As a big time football (soccer) fan who has watched the Premier League for more than a decade now, I've noticed that most of the English pundits/commentators butcher most foreign surnames. And it seems like they almost go out of their way to not make the effort to pronounce names as they would be in their native tongue.

Spanish names in particular.
I swear before Djokovic commentators from any English speaking country had no idea how to pronouce Slavic "ić" names.

Also hearing Danica as Danika shakes me to my core.
 

Fatoy

Member
Mar 13, 2019
1,398
Rage Rover!

But I think the main question here is whether the "-er" syllable is actually pronounced after some fashion, or degrades into a virtually soundless schwa. I think word endings in British English could well be following a similar evolution to that of French. In modern French the words are often more evident in the absence of pronunciation. They're written in a perfectly grammatical form of the written language, but the spoken language has a life of its own, unmoored from much of its grammatical roots
Case in point: I lived in France for four years as a teenager and went to a French speaking school. I speak good French, but my written French is awful. When you're speaking casually, you can get away with dropping a lot of different tenses and verb conjugations - same as in Spanish.
 

LL_Decitrig

User-Requested Ban
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
10,334
Sunderland
It's actually spelled without the second i in the US.
The spelling of aluminium or aluminum had undergone a few twists and turns. IUPAC settled on Aluminium nearly a century ago, but North America has ignored that ruling. The schoolchild Latin scholar in me says -ium should be ressrved for words that would otherwise have only two syllables. The schoolchild chemist in my responds with Ammonium. The nihilist teenager detonates the entire discussion with a single word combining both Greek and Latin roots: television.

Let's call the calling off off.
 

Dr. Zoidberg

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,052
Decapod 10
Sloth

US: Sloth (like Hoth or broth)
UK: Slowth (Slow with "th" at the end. At least that's how David Attenborough says it on the nature documentaries. Makes sense, I guess.)
 

bawjaws

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,306
Wait what?? I’ve lived in the UK all my life and never once heard a single person say it with sap like tree sap.

Sape-iens is the norm here, even for my 60 year old parents, and other older relations
JAG-yew-eh (Jaguar, controversial, I know), bah (bar), bee-eh (beer), or anything that ends in r. The r specifically is a hard (hahd) thing for Brits to enunciate. It's part of the accent, which is a good thing to me. It'd suck if we all sounded the same. Still tickles me, though.
Brits say hurricane funny.

US: hurra-KAIN
UK: hurri-KIN
All of these are examples of making the mistake that there's some sort of uniform UK dialect or accent. The correct answer is that it very much depends on where you are, and even over short distances there can be pronounced (pardon the pun) differences.
 

Devin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
682
This could easily be transposed to the obvious logic of Centigrade vs the madness of Fahrenheit
Most elements of the metric system are better than imperial measurements. Celsius is the one exception, in my mind. Fahrenheit is much more focused around useful temperatures for daily life, and it allows for much more accuracy for everyday life without decimals.

In Fahrenheit, you're very cold at 0° and very hot at 100°
In Celsius, you're cold at 0° and dead at 100°
 

23qwerty

Member
Oct 27, 2017
930
I listen to this Canadian podcast called Stop Podcasting Yourself, and one pronunciation that has come up a few times recently that was weird to me is the way they pronounce 'decal'. I pronounce it dee-kal, rhymes with pee pal. They pronounced it like deckle, rhymes with heckle. I don't know why it bothered me so much, but it just sounds weird.
I feel like decal is more of a personal pronunciation than a regional one, at least in Canada.
 

LL_Decitrig

User-Requested Ban
Banned
Oct 27, 2017
10,334
Sunderland
This could easily be transposed to the obvious logic of Centigrade vs the madness of Fahrenheit
Not convinced. I love Celsius overall, but I don't recall Fahrenheit being such a problem in my childhood when it was the UK national standard for weather. One of my adult kids keeps birds and I can see why they prefer Fahrenheit. It just feels like a scale more attuned to the needs of living creatures. Your body temperature hovers around 100F. You need to keep captive parrots well above 50F. And so on.
 
Jul 19, 2018
620
Most elements of the metric system are better than imperial measurements. Celsius is the one exception, in my mind. Fahrenheit is much more focused around useful temperatures for daily life, and it allows for much more accuracy for everyday life without decimals.

In Fahrenheit, you're very cold at 0° and very hot at 100°
In Celsius, you're cold at 0° and dead at 100°
Very cold and very hot are pretty subjective. Freezing and boiling are not. Having a scale where 32 = freezing and 212 = boiling is utterly nonsensical
 

butzopower

Member
Oct 27, 2017
988
London
Dinnastee vs Dienastee

Americans generally are closer to current native pronunciation of the origin language when it comes to words of Spanish and Italian origin.

The UK generally do much better with words of French origin, which seems a bit ironic to me, but not at all if you know the history of English.
Nah, Brits got fillet while Americans say filet.
 

Keldroc

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,805
I'm still getting over the fact that Australians pronounce Nike as one syllable that rhymes with "bike."
 

Devin

Member
Oct 27, 2017
682
Very cold and very hot are pretty subjective. Freezing and boiling are not. Having a scale where 32 = freezing and 212 = boiling is utterly nonsensical
Basing a temperature scale for humans on water temperature, rather than air temperature is utterly nonsensical. Fahrenheit gives more precise and meaningful temperatures for daily human needs.
 

Number45

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,912
Vagina

Aussies say "vah-j-eye-nah"
Brits say "vaj-a-nah"
Is this an in joke or reference I’m missing? UK here and I’ve never heard it pronounced like you’re suggesting.

I'm still getting over the fact that Australians pronounce Nike as one syllable that rhymes with "bike."
I grew up in the U.K. pronouncing it the same way. As mentioned earlier in the thread it makes perfect sense without a point of reference and it’s hard to get out of the habit.
 
Jul 19, 2018
620
Basing a temperature scale for humans on water temperature, rather than air temperature is utterly nonsensical. Fahrenheit gives more precise and meaningful temperatures for daily human needs.
Yeah you're right, this is a much more valid reason to have as zero in your scale.

Daniel Fahrenheit did not use the freezing point of water as a basis for developing his scale. He called the temperature of an ice/salt/water mixture 'zero degrees', as this was the lowest temperature he could conveniently attain in his lab.
 

Keldroc

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,805
I grew up in the U.K. pronouncing it the same way. As mentioned earlier in the thread it makes perfect sense without a point of reference and it’s hard to get out of the habit.
Did they not say the name out loud in ads or did the company just decide that was their pronunciation outside of American English?
 

bawjaws

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,306
Basing a temperature scale for humans on water temperature, rather than air temperature is utterly nonsensical. Fahrenheit gives more precise and meaningful temperatures for daily human needs.
Nah. If I say it's going to be 68 degrees Fahrenheit tomorrow, is that any different from if it's going to be 69 degrees F or 67 degrees F?

And if you want precision, just use decimal places in your celsius measurement.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,942
Basing a temperature scale for humans on water temperature, rather than air temperature is utterly nonsensical. Fahrenheit gives more precise and meaningful temperatures for daily human needs.
Do you live in the desert? 0°C is absolutely an important temperature if you live in a cold climate. It's when water freezes and you get snow instead of rain. 32°F and 0°F are meaningless.

And depending on where you live and what you're acclimatized to, 100°F isn't even that hot and is a nice temperature.
 

Almighty

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,612
These types of threads always get a chuckle out of me, but let it be said that i will be deep in the cold cold ground before I say maths instead of math.
 
Oct 25, 2017
1,129
So I was working in a bar in Virginia a few years ago, and a guy came in once. He made his order and a few minutes later said: "CAN I GET SUM ASS PLEASE??".
"Erm, excuse me, sir?"
"I need SUM ASS"
"Erm, sir, we're not that kinda place." Bear in mind that this was a mostly family oriented restaurant that had at least three kids sitting on the tables nearby.
"Whaddaya mean not that kinda place? I need sum ass, for my drink!"

Ice. He had ordered an Elijah Craig and needed some ice for it. I had also just moved in the US so it was a particularly weird situation for me lol.
The south is a strange place.